Regional
1:09 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

A New Fight For A Man Wrongly Jailed 25 Years

Courtesy: The Innocence Project

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A Texas man who spent nearly 25 years in prison for a murder he didn't commit wants tougher penalties against prosecutors who withhold evidence.

Michael Morton says he wants to ensure that prosecutors could be fined or even disbarred for concealing facts in the courtroom.

In an interview Thursday, the 57-year-old said he plans to get new rules enacted in Texas by working with lawmakers and the State Bar of Texas, and using the fame generated by his high-profile case.

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Author Interviews
1:08 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

'Escape From Camp 14': Inside North Korea's Gulag

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 6:09 pm

Until his early 20s, the only life Shin Dong-hyuk had ever known was one of constant beatings, near starvation and snitching on others to survive. Born into one of the worst of North Korea's system of prison camps, Shin was doomed to a life of hard labor and an early death. Notions of love and family were meaningless: He saw his mother as a competitor for food.

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Regional
1:04 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Holloman Group Works In Kuwait

Members of the 49th Material Maintenance Group work on the structure of a LAMS-V tent at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait.

 

CAMP ARIGJAN, KUWAIT – The 49th Material Maintenance Group, also known as The BEAR (Basic Expeditionary Airfield Resources) team, from Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., is a multi-skilled group that specializes in construction in support of deployed war fighters with U.S. Air Forces Central A7 J2 operations. J2 teams are comprised of large-team specialists that can build, demolish or repair large-area maintenance shelters, 4K and 8K dome shelters and aircraft hangars. The team does a 4 month rotation and travels to various installations in Afghanistan, and Kuwait.

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Law
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Neighborhood Watch Under Fire After Teen's Death

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 6:09 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

We begin this hour by exploring two questions that arise from the killing of Trayvon Martin. He's the 17-year-old shot by a neighborhood watch volunteer last month in Sanford, Florida. In a few minutes, we'll hear from two parents whose children were killed, and how they coped with the sudden media spotlight.

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Parents Make Child's Death Their Cause

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

These days, the parents of Treyvon Martin are in the news every day. In the months since their son was shot to death in Sanford, Florida, they've spoken at press conferences and rallies, addressed newspaper editorial boards and even Congress.

Treyvon's father, Tracy Martin, came here to NPR this week. On the program TELL ME MORE, he spoke about the process of dealing with his son's death, saying, it will be a long time before the healing even starts.

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Europe
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Pushed By Auserity Measures, Workers Strike In Spain

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

All over Spain today people did not show up for work. A general strike stalled public transportation, interrupted TV broadcasts, and shuttered factories and schools. The strikers are protesting sharp government cutbacks and big changes to labor laws; changes that are intended to jumpstart Spain's stagnant economy.

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Asia
12:51 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Headed For The Butcher, Chinese Dogs Are Rescued

A volunteer feeds one of the dogs rescued from slaughter last December in a stand-off between animal rights activists and dog-meat sellers in central China. Such rescues have been taking place with some regularity in China.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 6:06 pm

To say that people in China eat dogs is something of a stereotype.

Sure, some still do, but these days, more and more Chinese are buying dogs as pets and treating them like beloved family members.

In the last year, that growing affection has taken a radical turn. Activists have begun stopping trucks along the highway carrying dogs to slaughter and then negotiating their release.

A Last-Minute Rescue

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Movie Reviews
12:46 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

'Bully': A Provocative And Essential Documentary

Alex, one of the kids who struggles with bullies in Lee Hirsch's documentary Bully.
Weinstein Co.

For the second time in two weeks, a film that concerns itself with kid-on-kid violence arrives at the multiplex amid a firestorm of audience-generated, studio-fanned social-media interest.

Last week, The Hunger Games rode enthusiasm for Suzanne Collins' young-adult novels and a carefully orchestrated PR campaign to the best opening weekend of the year. Now comes the documentary Bully, director Lee Hirsch's sensitive look at anguished kids who've been cruelly targeted by their peers — which isn't going to do anything remotely like that kind of box-office.

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It's All Politics
12:38 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Democrats Embrace 'ObamaCare' To Defang It

Supporters of the health care law have recently embraced the term "Obamacare," a word they once recoiled from.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 4:50 pm

A funny thing happened on the way to the Supreme Court and during the three days the court heard oral arguments on the Affordable Care Act. Democrats embraced the "Obamacare" name the law's foes had used as an epithet for two years to deride the law.

In the political equivalent of what happens in battle when the enemy's captured artillery piece is turned around and the opponent's own shells are fired back at them, Democrats decided to take ownership of a word they once seemed to avoid at all costs.

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Remembrances
12:35 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Adrienne Rich: Resolution Amid The 'Turbulence'

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 1:52 pm

The memorials for the poet Adrienne Rich, who died Tuesday, will inc­­lude plenty of references to her feminism, her sometimes polemical leftism, her precocity, her difficult marriage (her husband killed himself in 1970), her subsequent partnership with the writer Michelle Cliff, and the books — beginning with 1963's Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law — that made her internationally famous. What can get a bit lost in all this, however, are the poems themselves.

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