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The Record
6:55 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

The Right Way To Complain About The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Future Hall Of Famers?: Green Day's Tre Cool (left), Billie Joe Armstrong (center) and Mike Dirnt) in New York City in 1994.
Ken Schles Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 12:39 pm

As a music geek, I often find myself in conversations, either online or over cocktails, about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Indeed, I've been nerding out about the Hall since last Thursday, when the institution announced its shortlist for induction into the Hall Class of 2015. And when I find myself in polite but argumentative company debating the Rock Hall, I have an approach I use.

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The Two-Way
6:54 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

A Pumpkin Festival Turns To Mayhem In Keene, N.H.

Local police, firefighters and ambulances in New Hampshire responded to riots during the annual Pumpkin Festival near Keene State College on Saturday.
Seth Meyer AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 1:17 pm

An annual pumpkin festival in Keene, N.H., devolved into mayhem as people threw beer bottles, lit fires, overturned at least one car and clashed with police late Saturday into Sunday morning.

The local Boston CBS station reports that police arrested at least a dozen people and about 30 were injured, forcing police to disperse the crowd with pellets and pepper spray.

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Around the Nation
5:09 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Why Did The Mountain Lion Cross The Freeway? To Breed

The proposed overpass would allow mountain lions to cross this section of freeway. One mountain lion was hit near here after apparently failing to make it over this wall.
Arun Rath NPR

In Los Angeles' Griffith Park, there is a mountain lion known as the "Hollywood Lion."

The big cat — known as P22 to ecologists — somehow made it across two very busy freeways to get there. Mountain lions like solitude, but if P22 wants to find a mate and have some cubs, he'll have to risk his life again in Los Angeles traffic.

P22's dilemma is one faced by an entire population of mountain lions along the 101 Freeway, less than 30 miles away from Griffith Park. The freeway slices right across the wilderness in this stretch of the Santa Monica Mountains.

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Author Interviews
5:01 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Many Views Of Muhammad, As A Man And As A Prophet

The Lives of Muhammad book cover

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:09 pm

The Prophet Muhammad, the founder of Islam, was one of the most influential men in human history — but there's little we can say about his life with historical certainty. The details of his life have been debated and manipulated ever since he walked the earth in the seventh century AD.

Boston University professor Kecia Ali's new book The Lives of Muhammad examines those divergent narratives. In it, she explores the different ways the prophet's life story has been told and retold, by both Muslims and non-Muslims, from the earliest days of Islam to the present.

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Around the Nation
3:32 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

As Cattle Prices Climb, Ranchers Watch Out For Bovine Thievery

It's a bull market for cattle: prices are climbing across the U.S. In Tulsa, Okla., stockyards reported selling 4,500 head of cattle at record prices in a single day's sale last week.
Charles Osgood AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:10 pm

Across the country, cattle prices continue to climb. That means profits for some ranchers — and huge potential payoffs for cattle thieves.

Drought in states like Texas and Oklahoma caused the cost of feed to rise, forcing ranchers to sell off their cattle stock. Now that feed prices are back down this fall, ranchers are looking to replenish their dwindling herds — and since cattle supply is low, that demand is driving the cost way up.

In Oklahoma, Tulsa stockyards reported selling 4,500 head of cattle at record prices in a single day's sale this month.

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Business
3:32 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Bucking The Fashion Trend, Converse Kicks Up A Fuss About Knockoffs

Nike-owned Converse, the company responsible for the Chuck Taylor All Star shoe, is suing to stop other shoemakers from copying what it says are distinctive elements of its design.
Grant Halverson AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:09 pm

Nike-owned Converse, the company responsible for the Chuck Taylor All Star shoe, is suing to stop other shoemakers from copying what it says are distinctive elements of its design: the rubber toe cap, the rubber bumper and two thin, black stripes.

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Arts & Life
3:32 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Waterless Worlds The New Hot Dystopia

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:09 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

My Big Break
3:32 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

From Mannequin To Actor: Geena Davis' 'Ridiculous, Ridiculous' Break

After college, Geena Davis got a job at an Ann Taylor clothing store. Then she noticed an empty chair in a window display, and she decided to sit down and freeze. "I was a live mannequin," she says.
Courtesy of Geena Davis

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:09 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Oscar-winning actress Geena Davis has played unforgettable roles in movies like Beetlejuice, Thelma and Louise and A League of Their Own, and she's been an outspoken advocate for female representation in cinema and TV.

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Code Switch
3:24 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

The Boston Herald's Missed 'Cartoon-gate' Lessons

The Boston Herald published this cartoon earlier this month.
The Boston Herald

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:15 pm

The worst fate of all may be to make a terrible mistake and then learn the wrong lessons from the experience.

That's the thought I had reading a heartfelt column about the Boston Herald's unfortunate decision to publish a cartoon featuring a White House gate-crasher asking the nation's first black president if he had "tried the new watermelon flavored toothpaste."

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The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Pentagon Preps Ebola Medical Response Team

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 12:47 pm

The Pentagon is training a 30-person medical response team designed to be deployed nationally in case anyone else in the country is diagnosed with Ebola.

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Admiral John Kirby said the team was formed based on a request from the Department of Health and Human Services.

"The team will consist of 20 critical care nurses, five doctors trained in infectious disease, and five trainers in infectious disease protocols," Kirby said.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Sun October 19, 2014

One Of 7 Northern White Rhinos Left In The World Dies In Kenya

Suni back in 2009, when the rhino arrived at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.
Riccardo Gangale AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 12:57 pm

Northern white rhinos are one step closer to extinction, after one of only two breeding males known to exist was found dead at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.

In a statement, the conservancy said Suni, 34, had not been poached, but they had not yet determined why the rhino died. It continued:

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Around the Nation
9:44 am
Sun October 19, 2014

As Their Wells Run Dry, California Residents Blame Thirsty Farms

Many rural California residents rely on private wells for tap water — wells that are starting to dry up.
Jeremy Raff KQED

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 2:28 pm

Imagine flushing the toilet and watching sand come up. That's what happened to Pam Vieira, who lives south of Modesto, Calif. Her water well has slowed to a trickle, and you can see the sand in the tank of her toilet.

"Sometimes we have brown water," Vieira says. "Sometimes we have no water."

Vieira is one of as many as 2 million rural California residents who rely on private domestic wells for drinking water.

Some of those people are among the hardest hit by the state's severe drought, as wells across the state's Central Valley farm belt start to go dry.

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Parallels
9:19 am
Sun October 19, 2014

An Urban Village Pops Up To Comfort Hong Kong Protestors

Student demonstrators don't want to fall behind on their studies, so volunteers built them an outdoor study hall. Some of the desks are built into the concrete highway divider.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:41 pm

Hong Kong's main pro-democracy protest camp turned 3 weeks old on Saturday.

What began as a roadblock has grown into an urban village, with several hundred tents that attract more than a thousand people at night.

The camp is a combination street fair and outdoor art gallery, with political sculptures and posters as well as speeches, movie screenings — even a free library.

The vibe at this pop-up protest colony is like an American college campus in the '60s — except it's on an island on the edge of the South China Sea and surrounded by skyscrapers.

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The Two-Way
8:57 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Healthcare Worker On Cruise Ship Tests Negative For Ebola

The cruise ship Carnival Magic passes near Cozumel , Mexico, on Friday.
Angel Castellanos AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 1:01 pm

A healthcare worker who had self-quarantined herself aboard a Carnival Cruise Lines ship has tested negative for Ebola and was allowed to disembark with the rest of the passengers in Galveston, Texas, on Sunday.

In a statement, the Galveston County Health Authority said it had determined "there is no evidence of a public health threat to cruise passengers or to Galveston county."

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Texas Hospital: 'We Are Deeply Sorry' For Missing Ebola Diagnosis

The exterior of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 1:15 pm

In a full-page letter published in Sunday's Dallas Morning News, Barclay Berdan, the CEO of the company that owns Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, said the hospital was "deeply sorry" for missing the ebola diagnosis of Thomas Eric Duncan.

If you remember, Duncan came into the hospital on Sept. 28 with a fever and other symptoms consistent with Ebola. He told a nurse he had traveled to Africa, but the doctor somehow missed that vital piece of information.

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Sports
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Are The Royals Just Lucky? The Week In Sports

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Iraq
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

ISIS Threat Is 'Extremely Worrying' Says Counter-Insurgency Expert

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Global Health
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

U.N. Ebola Chief: We Are Working 'At Full Speed'

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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National Security
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

DOD: Climate Change Is A Volatile Factor In International Security

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

California Farmers: We Are Getting 'Much Less Water'

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Will Ebola Impact Midterm Elections?

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Chef Ottolenghi Makes The Case For 'Plenty More' Vegetables

Peas With Sorrel And Mustard.
Jonathan Lovekin Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

When's the last time you cooked with sorrel leaves or nigella seeds? What about a marrow squash or verjuice? (Don't even know what a verjuice is? Neither did we — it's a special sauce made from semi-ripe wine grapes.)

All these ingredients might sound exotic and complicated, but chef Yotam Ottolenghi is here to convince you that you don't have to be a professional chef to use them. In his new book Plenty More Ottolenghi demonstrates how some off-the-beaten path ingredients can turn your quotidian vegetable side dish into a thing of majesty.

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Pop Culture
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Here's What Happens When Gandalf Talks To Schoolchildren

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Not all kids are so disciplined. Most parents are battling their children just to get them to sit down and study - threatening, cajoling, flat out bribing at times. What does it take to get them to buckle down and hit the books? It takes a wizard.

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Author Interviews
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Understanding Society Through 3 American Classics

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
5:03 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Liberians Wonder If Duncan's Death Was A Result Of Racism

Thomas Eric Duncan, the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the U.S., at a wedding in Ghana. Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where Duncan was being treated for the disease, on Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014 said Duncan has died.
Wilmot Chayee AP

Moffie Kanneh is angry at the United States. When I meet the Liberian lawyer, he asks immediately where I am from. "Take this back to Washington," he says. "I am extremely furious."

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This Week's Must Read
5:03 am
Sun October 19, 2014

After A Flurry Of Literary Awards, A Book On The 'Wonder' Of Words

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 5:09 pm

"Although it was only nine o'clock he had already gone once around the pharmacological wheel to which he'd strapped himself for the evening, stolen a tuba, and offended a transvestite; and now his companions were beginning, with delight and aplomb, to barf. It was definitely a Crabtree kind of night."

That, my friends, is one of those lines for which books were invented. For which awards were invented — to bestow temporary graces upon those lurching, bourbon-sodden romantics and idiots who believe that a life spent telling stories for nickels is worthwhile.

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Around the Nation
3:33 am
Sun October 19, 2014

The Kissimmee: A River Recurved

The restoration's goal is to put as much of the Kissimmee as possible back to the way it was. This photo shows the river after restoration.
Courtesy the South Florida Water Management District

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 9:19 am

It sounds almost superhuman to try straighten a river and then recarve the curves.

That's what federal and state officials did to the Kissimmee River in central Florida. They straightened the river in the 1960s into a canal to drain swampland and make way for the state's explosive growth. It worked — and it created an ecological disaster. So officials decided to restore the river's slow-flowing, meandering path.

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Pop Culture
3:32 am
Sun October 19, 2014

9 Lives And Counting: Hello Kitty Turns 40

Nurses check on newborns in the Hello Kitty-designed maternity ward at the Hau Sheng Hospital in Taiwan in 2009.
Wally Santana AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 12:27 pm

Hello Kitty is celebrating a big birthday this year. In the time since the first simple coin purse was sold in Japan back in 1974, Hello Kitty has become a multi-billion dollar empire — $8 billion worth of products bearing her image sold internationally in 2013. The Japanese company that created the cartoon cat now oversees the production of products ranging from backpacks to lunchboxes to picture books.

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Book Reviews
3:32 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Amid The Chaos Of Debt Collection, 'Bad Paper' Offers A Riveting Roadmap

cover crop
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Outside a corner storefront in Buffalo, six men tumble from a parked Mercedes. Most of them are ex-cons, some of them are armed and one of them — the polygamist — is packing his machete, to be ready, in his words, "when I run out of bullets." Not one of them weighs less than 240 pounds, and they're all keyed up for a confrontation with a suspected crook — which, as it turns out, goes down in a small storage closet. (Don't worry: No one gets injured.)

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Author Interviews
5:07 pm
Sat October 18, 2014

Back Across The Wall: Questions For Garth Nix

Cover crop

Australian author Garth Nix anticipated the boom in young adult literature almost 20 years ago with Sabriel, a dark and delightful tale of a young woman from a long line of necromancers tasked with making sure the dead stay dead. Sabriel and its sequels Lirael and Abhorsen were set in two neighboring countries divided by a mysterious wall: to the south, unmagical Ancelstierre, roughly analogous to 1920s England — and to the north, the Old Kingdom, saturated by magic and menaced by the roaming Dead.

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