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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Seven Baltimore Police Officers Hurt In Clashes With Protesters

A demonstrator taunts police as they respond to thrown objects, on Monday, after the funeral of Freddie Gray in Baltimore.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:32 pm

A day of mourning gave way to an evening of violent protests in Baltimore on Monday. Just hours after Freddie Gray's funeral, hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets and faced off with police.

Television images showed those demonstrators throwing rocks, bricks and bottles at a line of police officers in riot gear.

Capt. Eric Kowalczyk said seven officers had been hurt in the clashes. Some suffered broken bones and one of them, said Kowalczyk, is unresponsive.

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The Salt
3:04 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Chipotle Says Adios To GMOs, As Food Industry Strips Away Ingredients

Chipotle's announcement that it has removed all GMOs from its menu items is part of a growing food industry trend. From left: Nestle chocolates, Chipotle tortillas, Diet Pepsi, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner, a Subway sandwich. All of these companies have dropped ingredients over the past year in response to consumer demands.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:27 pm

Fast-casual food chain Chipotle Mexican Grill has announced it has removed all ingredients made with genetically modified organisms from its menu, making good on a two-year-old promise. It's the latest example of the food industry stripping away ingredients, some more questionable than others, as consumers demand a say in what's in their dinner.

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Parallels
2:54 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

For Europe-Bound Migrants, Desperation Outweighs Risks

Migrants crowd an inflatable dinghy as members of the Italian coast guard approach them off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea on April 22.
Alessandro Di Meo AP

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:18 pm

After a two-month wait in Libya, Hassan Silla, a 35-year-old from Sierra Leone, made the sea crossing from northern Africa to southern Italy on a smuggler's boat last February.

As one of 76 migrants on a 12-meter-long inflatable dinghy, Silla knew exactly what the risks were. Lawlessness and chaos have gripped Libya, and Silla says migrants from sub-Saharan Africa are the most vulnerable.

While waiting to make the crossing, he lost his best friend.

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NPR Ed
2:48 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

The Largest For-Profit College Shutdown In History

Corinthian operated colleges and training programs under the names Everest College, Heald, WyoTech and QuickStart Intelligence. This location is in Milwaukee.
Jeramey Jannene Flickr

The long-running story of the for-profit Corinthian Colleges has entered what looks like a final phase. As our colleagues at SCPR wrote:

Corinthian Colleges will shut down all of its remaining 28 ground campuses, displacing about 16,000 students, less than two weeks after the U.S. Department of Education announced it was fining the for-profit institution $30 million for misrepresentation.

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Politics
2:25 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

U.S., Japan Announce Updated Defense Guidelines

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
2:25 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Tsarnaev Defense Urges Jury To Spare His Life

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pop Culture
2:25 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Stephen Hawking Says Zayn Malik Could Still Be In One Direction In A Parallel Universe

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
1:46 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Don't Trust The Goats; Their Ticks Could Make You Sick

This is a deer tick. The taiga tick is nearly a clone — only a tick expert could tell the difference.
Patrick Pleul DPA /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 2:21 pm

Ticks transfer a range of diseases to humans, from the well-known Lyme to the lesser-known Babesiosis and Ehrlichiosis. Now, there's a previously undiscovered disease to add to the list, from bacteria called Anaplasma capra.

Now you may be wondering: Why is it important to find new diseases carried by ticks?

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

LOOK: Historic Nepal Sites Before And After The Quake

(Left) Nepalese devotees participating in a procession of chariots of god and goddess Ganesh, Kumari and Bhairav during the last day of Indrajatra festival at Durbar Square in Kathmandu, Nepal, on Sept. 22, 2013. (Right) The ruins on the Durbar Square after an earthquake in Kathmandu on Saturday.
Sunil Sharma Xinhua/Landov

More than 4,000 people are dead in Nepal after the devastating earthquake that hit the country over the weekend.

The human toll of the quake is massive, but the temblor has also damaged some of Kathmandu's most historic structures.

Here are some before-and-after images of some of those sites

Durbar Square

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Shots - Health News
12:50 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Feds Say It's Time To Cut Back On Fluoride In Drinking Water

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:18 pm

Federal health officials Monday changed the recommended amount of fluoride in drinking water for the first time since 1962, cutting by almost half the maximum amount of fluoride that should be added to drinking supplies.

The Department of Health and Human Services recommended a maximum of 0.7 milligrams per liter of water instead of the long-standing maximum of 1.2 milligrams.

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The Salt
12:02 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Sandwich Monday: Deep-Fried Cheese Curds

Deep-fried cheese curds.
NPR

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 12:26 pm

Whenever people from the edges of the country come to visit me in the Midwest, I don't let them leave until they have tried deep-fried cheese curds.

If you're not familiar with them, cheese curds are a byproduct of the cheddar cheese-making process, and "deep frying" is a method by which anything is made into a better version of itself.

You can find deep-fried cheese curds all over the states surrounding Wisconsin. But today we're eating the exceptional beer-battered ones from Farmhouse in Chicago.

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Music
11:31 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Alabama Shakes Opens New Territory On 'Sound & Color'

Over the course of Sound & Color, Alabama Shakes messes with what had already, after its first album, become its signature sound. Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker has this review.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Music Interviews
11:31 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Pokey LaFarge Mines His Midwestern Roots, Finds 'Something In The Water'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Commentary
11:31 am
Mon April 27, 2015

From TED Talks To Taco Bell, Abuzz With Silicon Valley-Style 'Disruption'

Martin Starr plays software designer Gilfoyle in the HBO comedy Silicon Valley. In the show's new season, Gilfoyle and his fellow techies attend a startup competition named "Disrupt."
Frank Masi HBO

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 3:22 pm

HBO's Silicon Valley is back, with its pitch-perfect renderings of the culture and language of the tech world — like at the opening of the "Disrupt" startup competition run by the Tech Crunch website at the end of last season. "We're making the world a better place through scalable fault-tolerant distributed databases" — the show's writers didn't have to exercise their imagination much to come up with those little arias of geeky self-puffery, or with the name Disrupt, which, as it happens, is what the Tech Crunch conferences are actually called.

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The Two-Way
10:02 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Freddie Gray's Funeral Spurs Calls For Calm In Baltimore

Mourners line up to pay their respects during Freddie Gray's funeral at the New Shiloh Baptist Church in Baltimore, Md., on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 2:12 pm

In Baltimore, the funeral of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old black man who died after being arrested, was held Monday. Gray's family and many public figures are calling for peace, after a weekend that saw violence and arrests.

"We must not allow an already tragic situation to tear our community apart," Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., said in a statement.

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The Two-Way
9:57 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Loretta Lynch Sworn In As U.S. Attorney General

Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 28 during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Updated at 11:41 a.m. ET

Loretta Lynch is the new U.S. attorney general.

Lynch was sworn in today by Vice President Joe Biden, who said the daughter of a Baptist minister who preached during the sit-ins in Greensboro, N.C., will now be "leading the march to a more perfect union."

Lynch, 55, is the nation's 83rd attorney general and the first black woman to hold the position. She said during a ceremony at the Justice Department that she would work to "imbue our criminal justice system with both strength and fairness" to protect the rights of all.

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Shots - Health News
9:53 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Chemical Change In Synthetic Marijuana Suspected Of Causing Illnesses

Dried plants dosed with psychoactive chemicals is marketed as K2 or spice.
Kelley McCall AP

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 1:39 pm

Over the past three weeks, people have been tumbling into emergency rooms across the country, seriously ill after using a synthetic drug known as K2 or spice.

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Parallels
9:42 am
Mon April 27, 2015

With The U.S. In The Background, Afghan Commandos Step It Up

Afghan commandos move through a smokescreen during a training exercise at Camp Commando on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 2:25 pm

With the U.S. combat role over in Afghanistan, the country's security now depends on men like Sgt. Maj. Faiz Mohammed Wafa, one of the leaders of the Afghan commandos.

On this day, the Afghan sergeant is screaming at trainees at Camp Commando, a training center built by the Americans in the hills south of Kabul. Two dozen trainees are seated in the dirt in full combat gear. Wafa is trying to teach them the proper way to clear a house, searching room to room for insurgents.

"I told you 10 times," he says. "Hold your weapons correctly!"

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Mon April 27, 2015

6 Novelists Withdraw From Event Honoring 'Charlie Hebdo' For Free Speech

Stephane "Charb" Charbonnier, the late editor of Charlie Hebdo, is seen in September 2012. PEN American Center's decision to give the French satirical magazine its annual Freedom of Expression Courage Award has prompted six writers to withdraw from the annual event.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 1:40 pm

Six writers have withdrawn from the PEN American Center's annual gala on May 5 in protest against the free-speech organization's decision to give the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo its annual Freedom of Expression Courage Award.

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The Two-Way
7:58 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Leave The Selfie Sticks At Home, Wimbledon Says

Tennis fans at this year's Wimbledon will have to take selfies the old-fashioned way, like these fans at last year's championships.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 8:33 am

Taking the same stance as the Kentucky Derby and other big events, the All England Lawn Tennis Club is telling ticket holders for this year's Wimbledon not to try to bring selfie sticks to matches. The club reportedly cited the devices' "nuisance value."

Large music festivals Coachella and Lollapalooza banned the photo-taking props last month, with Coachella dismissing them as "narciss-sticks." Many museums and galleries have similar policies.

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The Two-Way
6:34 am
Mon April 27, 2015

James Holmes' Trial Begins In Colorado, 3 Years After Cinema Shooting

A courtroom sketch shows accused murderer James Holmes sitting with Arapahoe County Public Defender Tamara Brady at the Arapahoe District Courthouse in Centennial, Colo., in January. His trial will begin with opening statements Monday.
Jeff Kandyba EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 2:23 pm

(This post was updated at 4:23 p.m. ET.)

More than 1,000 days after James Holmes opened fire on an audience at a midnight movie in Aurora, Colo., his trial began in earnest on Monday.

Prosecutors said that two mental health evaluations found Holmes was sane.

The AP reports that a prosecutor said Holmes killed 12 people and injured 70 more because he thought he " had lost his career, lost his love life, lost his purpose."

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Around the Nation
5:31 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Colorado State Patrol Nabs Literary Litterbug

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 6:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Mon April 27, 2015

More Than 4,000 Dead In Nepal As Earthquake Toll Rises

A woman and child rest in the open outside a destroyed building Sunday, a day after a major earthquake leveled homes in Kumalpur village on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal. Nine people reportedly died in the small village, including four children.
Narendrea Shrestha EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 1:07 pm

Updated at noon ET.

Nepal's devastating earthquake that hit Saturday is now blamed for at least 4,000 deaths. Reconstruction is estimated to cost billions. International aid efforts are underway, but aftershocks are rattling survivors' nerves and making the recovery even more challenging.

Rescue crews and aid groups are working to reach survivors — but their efforts are being hampered by the stricken areas' remote locations. Roads that are drivable are clogged with traffic.

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Around the Nation
5:00 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Airport Traveler In New York Stopped With Marijuana And Crack

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 6:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:23 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Same-Sex Supreme Court Case Raises Political Issues

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 6:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Mon April 27, 2015

For 40 Years, Maine County Helps Families Build Successful Healthy Habits

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 11:36 am

Copyright 2015 Maine Public Broadcasting Network. To see more, visit http://news.mpbn.net.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Mon April 27, 2015

The Shipwreck That Led Confederate Veterans To Risk All For Union Lives

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 9:47 am

On April 27, 1865, the steamboat Sultana exploded and sank while traveling up the Mississippi River, killing an estimated 1,800 people.

The event remains the worst maritime disaster in U.S. history (the sinking of the Titanic killed 1,512 people). Yet few know the story of the Sultana's demise, or the ensuing rescue effort that included Confederate soldiers saving Union soldiers they might have shot just weeks earlier.

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Shots - Health News
3:23 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Maybe You Should Rethink That Daily Aspirin

For all the good aspirin can do in preventing second heart attacks and strokes, taking it daily can boost some risks, too — of ulcers, for example, and of bleeding in the brain or gut.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 11:48 am

We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people wh have already experienced such an event or are at extremely high risk.

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It's All Politics
3:03 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Legal Battle Over Gay Marriage Hits The Supreme Court Tuesday

Protesters hold a pro-gay-rights flag outside the US Supreme Court on Saturday, countering the demonstrators who attended the March For Marriage in Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court meets on Tuesday to hear arguments over whether same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed in the United States, with a final decision expected in June.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 2:49 pm

People have been lining up outside the U.S. Supreme Court for days hoping that they will be among the lucky ones to get a seat for Tuesday's historic arguments on gay marriage.

As of now, gay marriage is legal in 36 states. By the end of this Supreme Court term, either same-sex couples will be able to wed in all 50 states, or gay marriage bans may be reinstituted in many of the states where they've previously been struck down.

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Movie Interviews
2:47 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Too Scared To Talk To Police, Stalker's Victims Open Up In 'Grim Sleeper'

A woman walks past a memorial for some of the victims who are said to have died at the hands of the serial killer dubbed the "Grim Sleeper."
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 12:05 pm

On Monday, HBO will air Tales of the Grim Sleeper, a documentary about a series of serial killings in South Central Los Angeles that took place from 1985 to 2002. A suspect was arrested in 2010. All these years later, the man accused of the crimes remains in jail and has yet to go on trial. But he — and the L.A. police department — are indicted in this film.

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