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World
3:30 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Syrian Government Believed To Be Behind Chlorine Gas Attack

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:28 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Actors' Equity Minimum Wage Proposal Could Threaten LA's Small Theaters

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:10 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

First-Place Fake-Out: Woman Who Didn't Run Marathon Stripped Of Title

Last Sunday, runner Kendall Schler was the first to cross the finish line at the GO! St. Louis Marathon. She received a $1,500 check and a photograph with Jackie Joyner-Kersee at the finish line. Trouble is Schler of Columbia, Mo., had not run the entire 26.2-mile course.

That's not all. Schler, race organizers say, also faked her third-place finish at last year's race – with a time that allowed her to qualify for the prestigious Boston Marathon this year.

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Goats and Soda
3:20 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Ebola Cases Dwindle, West Africa Turns To Economic Recovery

Liberian workers dismantle shelters in an Ebola treatment center in the Paynes Ville neighborhood of Monrovia. Doctors Without Borders closed the center last month because it was no longer needed.
Zoom Dosso AFP/Getty Images

West Africa is about to receive a hefty infusion of cash. This Friday the World Bank unveiled a major aid package for the three West African countries at the center of this past year's Ebola epidemic.

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Remembrances
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Bill Arhos, 'Austin City Limits' Founder, Dies At 80

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:44 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing A 'Wake-Up Call' For Government Security

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was "literally right up against the road so it was extremely vulnerable," said architect Barbara Nadel. One of the government's first responses was to close a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:10 pm

Twenty years ago this Sunday, a truck bomb exploded next to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. One hundred sixty-eight people were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured.

The bombing prompted heightened security at federal buildings — around the nation, and especially here in Washington.

One of the government's first responses to the bombing was closing a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

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NPR Ed
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

In New Orleans, A Second-Chance School Tries Again

Students arrive at CLA. More than half end up here after being expelled from other schools, usually for fighting, weapons or drugs.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:11 pm

Principal Nicholas Dean looks at his scarred, broken office door with resignation.

"Time to get a new lock," he says.

Over the weekend, a person or persons smashed into his office, found the keys to the school van, and drove off in it.

It's another day at Crescent Leadership Academy, one of New Orleans' three second-chance schools for students who have not been successful elsewhere.

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Remembrances
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Remembering Don Quayle, NPR's First President

Don Quayle, the first president of NPR, has died at the age of 84.
Sam Kittner WAMU 88.5

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:44 pm

The first president of National Public Radio has died. Don Quayle was 84 years old. He had a long career in public broadcasting — both television and radio. NPR's Susan Stamberg reflects on his impact.

Don Quayle gave me my first radio job. It was the early '60s and he was head of the Educational Radio Network — the precursor of NPR — a skinny little network of 12 East Coast stations that developed a daily drive-time news show. He hired me to help produce it. When this national network arose, he was an obvious choice to run it.

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Business
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Verizon Announces Changes To Its Cable TV Service

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:44 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Reviews
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

A Tart Take On Bitter Realities In 'Tangerines'

Ivo (Lembit Ulfsak) is a pacifist. But NPR film critic Bob Mondello says Tangerines is an "object lesson in the resilience of ancient animosities."
Courtesy of Samuel Goldwyn Films

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:44 pm

It's 1992, shortly after the fall of the Soviet Union in the Oscar-nominated Tangerines, and in a bleak, northwest corner of the Republic of Georgia called Abkhazia, the world has more or less come apart. Warring factions — Chechen separatists, Georgian troops — patrol rural roads in jeeps outfitted with bazookas and machine guns. The locals have mostly fled for more urban areas.

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The Salt
2:58 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Running A Marathon? How To Eat and Drink So You Don't Hit The Wall

Performance nutrition experts recommend stopping at all the hydration stations for a quick fill-up of a sports drink to replenish the glycogen that's being burned during a marathon.
iStockphoto

Elite runners know the drill. When you run a marathon, you've got to consume extra amounts of carbohydrate — either from food or energy gels or energy drinks — in order to go the distance.

And if you don't fuel up enough? You may hit the wall during the big event, which, believe me, is pretty miserable.

The wall comes on abruptly. Suddenly your legs feel like lead. And then you're woozy.

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Around the Nation
2:50 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Lake Mead Levels Drop, The West Braces For Bigger Drought Impact

Lake Mead is at its lowest levels since it was built in the late 1930s.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:57 pm

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: The now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

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The Record
2:35 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Solving The Vinyl Comeback's Big Problem, One Antique Machine At A Time

One of the record presses on the floor at the Quality Record Pressings plant in Salina, Kan.
Courtesy of Acoustic Sounds

Saturday is Record Store Day, when independent music retailers around the country host parking-lot concerts and sell limited-edition pressings of vinyl records, which have made a small but forceful comeback in an age dominated by digital listening habits. But if there's one problem with the vinyl resurgence, it might be this: The machines that press vinyl records are decades old, and no one's building new ones, so keeping up with increased demand is hard.

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Monkey See
1:41 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

The Challenges Of War At A Distance

Ethan Hawke and January Jones in Andrew Niccol's Good Kill.
Lorey Sebastian Clear Skies Nevada LLC/IFC Films

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 2:32 pm

The opening moments of Good Kill, a new drama starring Ethan Hawke and written and directed by Andrew Niccol (who also directed Hawke in Gattaca), almost eerily resemble the opening moments of American Sniper. A man watches and tries to interpret the movements of a woman and child who don't see him, deciding whether to kill them. This man, however, isn't concealed nearby. The woman and child are in Afghanistan and the man is piloting a drone from an air conditioned trailer on a military base in Nevada.

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It's All Politics
1:29 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Mike Huckabee

Huckabee ran the Marine Corps Marathon in 2005.
Kevin Wolf AP

When former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee ran for president in 2008, he surprised many political watchers with a big a victory in the Iowa caucus. "What we have seen is a new day in American politics," he said after he was declared the winner. "This election will start a prairie fire of hope and zeal."

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

WATCH: Chimps In Uganda Look Both Ways Before Crossing

A troop of chimpanzees in Uganda has learned to look both ways before crossing a busy highway.
New Scientist

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:10 pm

Call it Darwinian evolution in action: A troop of wild chimpanzees in Uganda has learned a valuable survival skill — to look before crossing.

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Why A Blockbuster Of A Trade Deal With Asia Matters

Freighters wait to unload cargo at the Tanjung Pagar container port in Singapore.
Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:51 pm

It has been a decade in the making, but when completed, it will be a free trade agreement to beat all others — representing 40 percent of the world's economy.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, agreement would bring together the economies of the U.S., Japan, Australia and nine other Pacific Rim nations, allowing the free trade of everything from agriculture to automobiles and textiles to pharmaceuticals.

President Obama said Friday that the deal is critical for the U.S. market.

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

U.N., Oxfam Report At Least 120,000 Displaced In Yemen Fighting

Militants loyal to Yemen's President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi take their positions in Taiz, Yemen, late last month after at least 45 people were killed in north Yemen after an airstrike hit a camp for internally displaced people.
Anees Mahyoub UPI/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 1:41 pm

Tens of thousands of people have been displaced in the fighting in Yemen, the United Nations says today in a new report, which warns that the figure could rise dramatically unless the conflict is ended.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) says the number of displaced persons in Yemen is estimated at between 120,000 and 150,000. (Separately, Oxfam puts the figure at 121,000).

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The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

#NPRreads: From The Hell Of The North To 'Trash' Food

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we share with you five reads.

From Ina Jaffe, a correspondent on NPR's National Desk:

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Obama Immigration Policy Up For Debate In Federal Court

The John Minor Wisdom U.S. Courthouse, home of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bobak/Wikimedia Commons)

In November, President Obama announced executive actions that would allow 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the country and obtain work permits. Not long after, a Texas judge ordered a freeze on those actions.

Today the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in New Orleans will be hearing arguments from federal lawyers and 26 states opposing Obama’s order on whether to lift the freeze and allow his policies to move forward, or to leave the immigration policies in limbo.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

DJ Sessions: Swing And Vintage Jazz

Artie Shaw plays the clarinet on Sept. 10, 1941. The clarinetist and bandleader's recording of "Begin the Beguine" epitomized the Big Band era. (AP)

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson is broadcasting from Washington, D.C., and sits down with Rob Bamberger, the longtime host of “Hot Jazz Saturday Night” on WAMU in Washington. Bamberger brings us sounds from Jelly Roll Morton to Artie Shaw and His Orchestra.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

2015 Boston Marathon Preview

A worker adjusts lights on the photo bridge near the Boston Marathon finish line Thursday, April 16, 2015, on Boylston Street in Boston. The 119th Boston Marathon will be run on Monday. (Steven Senne/AP)

The 119th Boston Marathon, the world’s oldest, will be run on Monday. The 26.2-mile race starts in rural Hopkinton, Mass., and takes the runners through several other communities before finishing in downtown Boston.

That’s where two bombs exploded during the 2013 race, killing three people and injuring more than 260. The attack sparked increased security for spectators and runners that will remain in place for the second year.

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Can Top Slugger Joining Cubs End 106 Years Of Sadness?

Top prospect Kris Bryant of the Chicago Cubs will bat fourth in his debut Friday against the San Diego Padres. Bryant hit 43 home runs in the minors last season.
Chris Carlson AP

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 1:14 pm

The wait is over for Cubs fans.

Well, not the more than 106-year wait for a World Series Championship, but the wait for arguably the most exciting young slugger in baseball to join their club.

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Goats and Soda
11:46 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Yes, You Can Help The World And Make Money At The Same Time

A woman cultivates seaweed off the coast of Madagascar to counter overfishing. She's working with Blue Ventures, a business that supports its conservation projects by giving ecotours.
Courtesy of Skoll Foundation

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:08 pm

What do you call someone who runs a successful business that aims to make the world a better place? A CEO with a conscience? A do-good bottom-liner?

At the Skoll World Forum this week in Oxford, England, the preferred term is social entrepreneur. In fact, the conference is completely devoted to the idea — and promoting its rising stars.

Young entrepreneurs are invited to join veterans for workshops, talks and confabs. Awards are given for "social entrepreneurship."

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Pop Culture
11:17 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Comedian Joel McHale Talks Dyslexia, Bad TV And Filming A Thriller

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm David Bianculli sitting in for Terry Gross.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "COMMUNITY")

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Movie Reviews
11:17 am
Fri April 17, 2015

In 'True Story,' A Shamed Journalist Interviews A Fugitive Who Stole His Identity

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Fri April 17, 2015

TV's 'Sabado Gigante' Will Cease Production This Fall, Ending Record Run

Chilean TV host Mario Kreutzberger, seen here in 2012, will stop making his Sabado Gigante show this September.
Mario Ruiz EPA /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 2:26 pm

After 53 years, Don Francisco will finally put down the mic. Univision says it will stop making the legendarily unpredictable variety show Sábado Gigante in September, ending a run that began in 1962 when Chile's Mario Kreutzberger started entertaining viewers as Don Francisco.

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Violence Against Immigrants In South Africa Turns Deadly

South African hostel dwellers demonstrate against foreigners in Johannesburg on Friday after overnight violence between locals and immigrants in the city.
Shiraaz Mohamed AP

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 11:07 am

Violence against immigrants in South Africa has killed at least five people, resulted in attacks on businesses owned by foreigners and sent thousands to take refuge at temporary shelters.

A massive rally against xenophobia was held Thursday in Durban, the coastal city that has been the scene of much of the unrest. Migrants from Africa and South Asia have been the target of the violence, which was condemned by President Jacob Zuma.

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Shots - Health News
9:31 am
Fri April 17, 2015

The State Of The Cancer Nation

Matt Stiles and Christopher Groskopf/NPR

While a cure for cancer remains elusive, we already know how to keep many cases of the disease from developing in the first place.

People can reduce cancer risks by keeping a healthful weight and avoiding cigarettes.

But smoking, obesity and other major cancer risk factors remain common, and still vary widely across the country.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Key Figure In Saddam's Regime Reportedly Killed By Iraqi Forces

Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, a former member of Saddam Hussein's inner circle (shown here in 2002), leads one of the Sunni armed factions helping ISIS in its fight against the Iraqi government.
Jassim Mohammed AP

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:06 pm

Iraqi forces claim to have killed Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, who served in Saddam Hussein's leadership circle and is believed to have been instrumental in the sudden rise of the self-declared Islamic State.

But an official from Saddam's Baath Party has denied the report.

Douri, 72, is the "king of clubs" in the deck of playing cards U.S. troops used to identify key figures in Saddam's regime following the 2003 invasion that toppled the Baathist regime.

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