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Shots - Health News
3:30 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Could Your Child's Picky Eating Be A Sign Of Depression?

One of the frequent trials of parenthood is dealing with a picky eater. About 20 percent of children ages 2 to 6 have such a narrow idea of what they want to eat that it can make mealtime a battleground.

A study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics shows that, in extreme cases, picky eating can be associated with deeper trouble, such as depression or social anxiety.

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All Tech Considered
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Author: Tech Firms' Rhetoric Outpaces The Actual Good They Do

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

HitchBOT: When Bad Things Happen To Good Robots

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Obama's Climate Plan Faces Huge Political Challenges

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Energy
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

How EPA Rules Would Hit Coal-Heavy West Virginia

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Ultimate Frisbee Recognized By Olympic Committee

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of ping-pong.
Courtesy of Andela

The continent of Africa has long been seen as the place where humanitarian aid and World Bank loans go — to attempt to save lives or to dictate how countries should grow.

Now there's a new movement underway — a technology movement. Young entrepreneurs from the continent are protesting the old ways by launching startups that, they say, will put Africans in the driver's seat. But not everyone agrees that technology is the solution to Africa's problems.

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The Salt
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

Not only did the family trade their urban life for a one in a beautiful valley surrounded by mountains and trees, but they also earn $300,000 a year.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Kim Pil-Gi left his construction job in Seoul, South Korea, three months ago. Now he happily spends his days handling grubs: squirming, writhing, beetle larvae, each one about as thick as a grown man's thumb. He sits at a tray, sorting them by size.

"At the construction company a lot of the time I'd wake up at six in the morning and work all night through to the next day," he says. "That was really hard for me."

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NPR Story
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

From The Eye Of The Hurricane To Near Oblivion: Katrina's Forgotten Town

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Pearlington, Miss., a tiny town on the border with Louisiana. A home currently under construction there adheres to new FEMA standards for elevation.
David Schaper NPR

When Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast 10 years ago, the eye of the storm made landfall near a tiny speck of a town at the mouth of the Pearl River on the Louisiana border with Mississippi.

To say Katrina — one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history — nearly wiped Pearlington, Miss., off the map isn't entirely true. The fact is, Pearlington was so small that it wasn't even on many maps.

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Your Money
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Alabama Drivers Are Filling Up On Cheap Gas

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Puerto Rico Fails To Make Its Bond Payment

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Fine Art
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Sultan 'Ali 'Adil Shah II Slays a Tiger (ca. 1660) is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's critically acclaimed Sultans of Deccan India, 1500-1700 Opulence and Fantasy exhibition.
The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

This is an introduction to NPR's Muslim Artists, Now series, which will highlight contemporary Muslim musicians, writers, painters and filmmakers, among others.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

New York Attorney General Orders Immediate Halt To Realistic Toy Gun Sales

It is illegal to sell toy guns in New York that look real.
John Moore Getty Images

Toy guns that look real should no longer be sold in New York.

NPR's Joel Rose reports that retailers who were selling realistic-looking toy guns have agreed to halt their sales of the product. Wal-Mart, Amazon and other retailers have also agreed to pay $300,000 in fines as part of a settlement announced Monday.

An investigation by the New York Attorney General's office, more than 6,000 toy guns that violate New York law were sold in the state in the last three years.

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The Two-Way
3:14 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

California Wildfire Blazes Through 60,000 Acres, Containment Estimated Next Week

The "Rocky Fire" isn't expected to be contained until August 10.
Josh Edelson AFP/Getty Images

As wildfires continue to blaze across California, one fire is more expansive in its reach than others. It's called Rocky Fire, and began last week. It has already burned through at least 60,000 acres.

The Rocky Fire, one of numerous active wildfires in the state, is north of San Francisco, and member station KQED reports it is roughly double the size of the city.

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The Salt
2:54 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Wanted: More Bulls With No Horns

One of the hornless Holsteins at Steve Maddox's California dairy farm. Maddox is beginning to breed hornless cattle into his herd, but it's slow going.
Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

The next time you're in the dairy aisle at the supermarket, take a moment to imagine the animals that produced all that milk. Do these cows have horns? Chances are they do, or at least they did at birth.

About 85 percent of milk sold in the United States comes from Holstein cows born with horns. But it's standard practice for farms to remove horns from cattle to prevent injuries to workers, veterinarians and other cows in the herd.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

Falling oil prices have put downward pressure on gasoline prices, now averaging $2.65 a gallon — about 85 cents cheaper than a year ago.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Oil prices took another drop Monday, rattling the stock market and putting more downward pressure on gasoline prices.

For oil companies, the price slump is hitting hard at profits, but for U.S. motorists, the downshift has brought savings at the pump.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

The Average Car In The U.S. Is 11.5 Years Old

A 2004 Toyota Camry ranked no. 3 for best-selling vehicle in 2004, and the Toyota Camry is still America's best-selling car. (long-mai/Flickr)

A new automotive survey from the research organization IHS says that the the average car on the road is 11.5 years old. But automotive sales numbers for July are higher than estimates and some car makers are beating their sales from last year.

Is the auto industry contradicting itself?

Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Paul Eisenstein, publisher of The Detroit Bureau, an online automotive publication to talk about the aging U.S. automobile.

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Shots - Health News
1:30 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Snail Venom Yields Potent Painkiller, But Delivering The Drug Is Tricky

The sea snail Conus magus looks harmless enough, but it packs a venomous punch that lets it paralyze and eat fish. A peptide modeled on the venom is a powerful painkiller, though sneaking it past the blood-brain barrier has proved hard.
Courtesy of Jeanette Johnson and Scott Johnson

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 3:17 pm

Researchers are increasingly turning to nature for inspiration for new drugs. One example is Prialt. It's an incredibly powerful painkiller that people sometimes use when morphine no longer works. Prialt is based on a component in the venom of a marine snail.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Why George Washington University Is Ditching Standardized Tests

George Washington University is the latest school to make the SATS and ACTs optional for admission. (slack13/Flickr)

This fall, some high school seniors will have it easier in the college application process. George Washington University, one of the nation’s top private schools, is the latest school to make the SATs and ACTs optional for admission.

NPR’s Claudio Sanchez talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young and explains that the school hopes the move will help recruit and enroll more high-achieving students who don’t do well on tests.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Containment Of Raging California Wildfire Jumps

Firefighters spray a hose at a fire along Morgan Valley Road near Lower Lake, Calif. on July 31, 2015. (Jeff Chiu/AP)

LOWER LAKE, Calif — Firefighters aided by lower temperatures and higher humidity have made progress corralling a wildfire threatening thousands of homes in Northern California.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Capt. Don Camp says containment of the fire in the Lower Lake area north of San Francisco was at 12 percent Monday morning after being stuck at 5 percent for days.

The fire — the largest in California — grew extensively over the weekend and measured 93 square miles by early Monday.

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The Salt
1:03 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight.
Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 3:01 pm

Bumblebees are important pollinators of crops and wildflowers across the U.S., and they gather heavy loads of nectar and pollen from flowers. A study published Monday shows that the type of food they carry affects how they fly.

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

President Obama Unveils New Power Plant Rules In 'Clean Power Plan'

President Obama delivers remarks at a Clean Power Plan event at the White House on Monday.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 2:03 pm

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

President Obama formally unveiled his plan to cut power plant emissions — some two years in the making — calling it the "single most important step that America has ever made in the fight against global climate change."

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Author Interviews
12:49 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Reflecting On Football And Addiction As 'Friday Night Lights' Turns 25

Da Capo Press

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 2:44 pm

Twenty-seven years ago, journalist Buzz Bissinger decided that he wanted to write about the big-time stakes of small-town high school football — he just needed to find the right town. At the suggestion of a college recruiter, he visited Odessa, a west Texas town with a high school football stadium capable of seating 19,000 — and a population of approximately 90,000.

"Odessa is just kind of a dusty, gritty place," Bissinger tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "And I see that stadium ... and it's like a rocket ship on the desert."

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Goats and Soda
12:47 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Wheelchair Beauty Queen Sings For Toilets

Grace Jerry performs her original single "E Go Happen" at a gathering of young African leaders at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home. The lyrics say: "Yes we can, sure we can change the world."
YouTube

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 3:15 pm

Grace Alache Jerry is everything you'd imagine a pageant winner should be — beautiful, smart, articulate. She's a gifted musician, holds a diploma in law and even campaigns for the less fortunate.

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Goats and Soda
12:32 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Basketball (And The NBA) Try To Find Fans In South Africa

The night before the NBA exhibition game, two South African teams faced off in Johannesburg. Hoops aren't exactly a huge draw in the soccer-loving country. Attendance was about 1,000.
Don Boroughs for NPR

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 2:21 pm

Motlapule Mofokeng missed his chance to see the biggest professional basketball game ever played in South Africa on Saturday. Tickets sold out in less than an hour for the NBA's All-Star Team Africa vs. Team World game in Johannesburg.

Fortunately, it wasn't the only big game in town. On Friday night the fashion design student at Vaal University of Technology cheered on the Egoli Magic, 7-0, as they battled the only other undefeated team in the Basketball National League (BNL), the Tshwane Suns.

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Shots - Health News
11:22 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Calls To Cut Off Planned Parenthood Are Nothing New

Protesters rally on the steps of the Texas state capitol on July 28 to condemn the use of fetal tissue for medical research.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 1:16 pm

Republican calls to defund Planned Parenthood over its alleged handling of fetal tissue for research are louder than ever. But they are just the latest in a decades-long drive to halt federal support for the group.

This round aims squarely at the collection of fetal tissue, an issue that had been mostly settled — with broad bipartisan support — in the early 1990s. Among those who voted then to allow federal funding for fetal tissue research was now-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Texas Attorney General Turns Himself In On Fraud Charges

Attorney General Ken Paxton was booked on three felony securities fraud charges in Texas on Monday morning.
Collin County.gov Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 1:37 pm

Facing securities fraud charges, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton turned himself in at a jail in Collin County, Texas, on Monday morning. A grand jury recently indicted Paxton on three felony charges that accuse him of misleading investors into a technology company.

"Two of the charges — first-degree felony securities fraud — carry the possibility of hefty jail sentences," reports member station KUT in Austin.

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Second American Accused In Illegal Killing Of Lion In Zimbabwe

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 12:18 pm

Zimbabwean wildlife officials have accused a second American of killing a lion during an illegal hunt, this one in April. It comes a week after the international furor set off by the killing of Africa's iconic lion Cecil by a Minnesota dentist in early July.

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It's All Politics
10:14 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Ted Cruz Makes 'Mmm ... Machine-Gun Bacon'

Presidential candidate Ted Cruz trying bacon — made on a machine gun — at the end of a new video.
YouTube/IJReview

In a new video, presidential candidate Ted Cruz has manages to combine one of America's near-universal loves with one of its more contentious pastimes: bacon and guns.

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The Two-Way
9:58 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Group Offers To Help Revive HitchBOT That Was Vandalized In Philadelphia

As part of its U.S. travels, hitchBOT rode along with two boys who were heading to summer camp. But a week later, the robot was found to have been vandalized.
hitchBOT

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 10:44 am

The story of hitchBOT — the robot that had visited Europe and New York City, but couldn't make it out of Philadelphia in one piece — may not be over. A Philadelphia tech group is offering to rebuild the robot and hoping to repair their city's reputation.

A kid-sized robot that's built around a plastic bucket and sports a friendly LED face, hitchBOT had been on a mission to travel from Massachusetts to San Francisco, relying on the kindness of humans it meets along the way.

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