National/World

Pages

StoryCorps
1:22 am
Fri July 13, 2012

A Small Town's Post Office, And Its 'Squire'

Freddie Wood stands at the counter of the Wood & Swink general store in Evinston, Fla.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 8:17 am

This month, the U.S. Postal Service begins cutting back hours and services at rural post offices across the country. One store facing changes sits inside the Wood & Swink general store in the northern Florida town of Evinston. The store has been in Freddie Wood's family for more than 100 years. In that time, it's gone through only small changes.

Read more
Crisis In The Housing Market
1:20 am
Fri July 13, 2012

County Considers Eminent Domain As Foreclosure Fix

Half of San Bernardino County's 300,000 mortgages are underwater. In an attempt to ease the mortgage crisis, the Southern California county is considering taking control of some of those properties by eminent domain.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 9:04 am

County and city officials in San Bernardino, Calif., are considering a controversial plan: using the power of eminent domain to take over "underwater" mortgages, where the value of the home is worth less than the original loan. Taking on those properties, officials say, would allow the homeowners to refinance those troubled loans.

Read more
Humans
1:20 am
Fri July 13, 2012

In Ancient Ore. Dump, Clues To The First Americans?

Displayed in the hand of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins are three bases for western stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The bases date to some 13,000 years ago.
Jim Barlow Science/AAAS

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 8:16 am

Some of the most interesting discoveries in archaeology come from sifting through ancient garbage dumps. Scientists working in Oregon have found one that has yielded what they say are the oldest human remains in the Americas and a puzzle about the earliest American tools.

Early Americans used Oregon's Paisley Caves for, among other things, a toilet. Little did they know that scientists would be picking through what they left behind.

Read more
Planet Money
1:19 am
Fri July 13, 2012

The European Central Bank's Guide to Influence

European Central Bank president Mario Draghi, left, speaks with Spanish Finance Minister Luis De Guindos on Monday. The ECB has increased its influence over European countries struggling with debt.
Georges Gobet AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 4:08 pm

Europe is struggling, thanks to a relentless debt crisis. Compounding its problems: It is not one country, but 17.

Many observers agree that to solve their problems, those countries have to start looking a lot more like one country. And there is a force in Europe trying to make that happen: the European Central Bank. The weapon it has that everyone else lacks? Money.

Read more
Television
1:18 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Sigourney Weaver: No Damsel In Distress

In Political Animals, Sigourney Weaver plays Elaine Barrish, a secretary of state and former first lady whom Weaver says is based on many former residents of the White House — not just on Hillary Clinton.
David Giesbrecht USA Network

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 9:04 am

There's no culture more distinct than the political circles of Washington, D.C., and Sigourney Weaver is taking it on in Political Animals, a new television series where she plays a former first lady and current secretary of state.

Over the course of a distinguished acting career, Weaver has battled intergalactic aliens and befriended gorillas in the mist. In Political Animals, Weaver's character, Elaine Barrish, finds her biggest adversary in a hyperambitious political reporter by the name of Susan Berg.

Read more
Presidential Race
1:17 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Why Would Romney Bury Treasure In Bermuda?

The Thistle House in Hamilton, Bermuda, is listed as the address of Mitt Romney's Bermuda corporation.
David Welna NPR

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 9:04 am

New questions about Mitt Romney's overseas investments have dogged the GOP presidential contender all week. Many arose from a report in the latest issue of Vanity Fair. It describes how the day before Romney was sworn in as governor of Massachusetts, he put a corporation he'd set up in Bermuda in a blind trust held by his wife, Ann. Romney insists he did nothing wrong.

Read more
Ask Me Another
7:53 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Greg Pak: You Wouldn't Like Him When He's Angry

Greg Pak visits Ask Me Another at The Bell House in Brooklyn, NY.
Eric Nuzum NPR

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 12:41 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
5:29 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Britain's National Archives Releases Documents Detailing Work Of 'UFO Desk'

This picture titled "UFO near helicopter" was released by the National Archives.
The National Archives, U.K.

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 6:42 pm

Britain's National Archives has released the ninth tranche of documents about the country's once secret "UFO desk."

According to The Guardian, the documents are the first to detail the inner workings of the team that operated under the country's Ministry of Defence.

The Guardian reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

From Our Readers On Dylan's Electric Guitar: 'That Is Chutzpah'

We told readers not to "get excited" in our headline about PBS' History Detectives potentially misidentifying a guitar from Bob Dylan's first electric performance. Our commenters took our advice, but they certainly showed some ire that the guitar, famous or not, would not have been returned to the artist in the first place.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:11 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Between Touchdowns And Triple Jumps, Politicians Are Popping Up On Sports TV

Will these Green Bay fans be cheering as much as they did during the 2011 Super Bowl when their beloved Packer games are interrupted by local political ads this fall?
Matt Ludtke Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 9:10 am

Along with the highlights, the trade rumors and news of misbehaving athletes, viewers of ESPN's SportsCenter are about to get a bigger dose of politics.

The sports giant says it will sell commercial time to candidates in local markets now instead of just nationally. Executives are selling it as a good fit for politicians.

Read more
Election 2012
4:10 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Arizona Tea Party Activists Say They're Back

Arizona businessman Wil Cardon attends a luncheon in Scottsdale. Cardon faces six-term Rep. Jeff Flake in the Republican primary race for U.S. Senate.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:37 pm

Maricopa County, Ariz., where 3 out of 5 Republicans in the state live, has become a hotbed of Tea Party activism.

That's where the head of the Original North Phoenix Tea Party lives. His name is Wesley Harris, and he used to manufacture precision rifle barrels. These days, his son runs the business, while Harris spends most of his time as a full-time Tea Party activist.

Running Against Disenchantment

Read more
The Two-Way
4:07 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Opposition Forces Say At Least 100 Killed By Assad Regime In Syria

Al Arabiya is calling it another "massacre." Quoting the opposition, they report that "scores of dead bodies were scattered in houses and in farms in al-Tremsa, while more than 150 dead bodies have been piled up in the al-Tremsa mosque."

Read more
Middle East
3:44 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Report: Violence Against West Bank Palestinians Is Up

Jewish settlers in the West Bank throw stones during clashes with Palestinians near the city of Nablus on May 19. A new report says violence by settlers directed at West Bank Palestinians is up sharply over the past three years.
Jaafar Ashtiyeh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 6:47 am

Farming is the mainstay of the Palestinian communities around the West Bank village of Yanoun. Animals graze the land, and Palestinians make their living by harvesting citrus fruits and olives.

Last Saturday, Palestinians say, a group of Jewish settlers killed some of the sheep belonging to the Bani Jabr family. Palestinians say its part of a regular pattern of harassment in the area by settlers.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

In A Conflicted India, A Doomed Romance Unfolds

Trishna (Freida Pinto) is the titular character in Michael Winterbottom's adaptation of Tess of the D'Urbervilles, which lends the novel's deteriorating romance a feeling of inevitability.
Marcel Zyskind IFC Films

"Do you think you'll have to pay a high price for your mistakes?"

That line is spoken on an Indian game show watched by Trishna, the title character of Michael Winterbottom's subcontinental rethink of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles.

The penalties for mistakes on the game show are only monetary in nature, of course. For Trishna, the costs of her errors in judgment are measured on an entirely different scale. This being a Hardy story, you can count on this: They'll be high, and they'll be unpleasant.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

For The Grieving, A Thin Lifeline To The Departed

Mont Blanc (Aris Servetalis) leads a group of people who offer a peculiar service: the replacement of departed loved ones. Imitating hairstyle and favorite quotes is normal, though some in his group go so far as to re-enact more private events.
Kino Lorber

Alps, the tightly controlled burn from Dogtooth director Giorgos Lanthimos, begins with a simple image: a girl twirling a ribbon. Practicing her routine in a large gym, the rhythmic gymnast (Ariane Labed) moves powerfully, spinning and tumbling across the mats in choreography set to "O Fortuna." She finishes, but as she complains to her coach, a middle-aged track-suit-wearing type (Johnny Vekris), the routine just isn't working — she'd rather be doing a pop song. She's ready for pop, she insists.

The coach disagrees.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Two Fractious Sisters, Reunited But Still At Odds

In Union Square, Jenny (Tammy Blanchard, left) gets a surprise visit from her estranged sister, Lucy (Mira Sorvino), an emotional train wreck whose outsize personality clashes with Jenny's carefully constructed self-image.
Gerardo Somoza Reunion Pictures

The Mira Sorvino who won an Oscar for her full-bodied twist on the hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold type in Woody Allen's Mighty Aphrodite resurfaces in Union Square, a micro-budget indie that calls for a similar brand of New York brassiness.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Science And The Paranormal, At Odds To The Finish

In Red Lights, Simon Silver (Robert De Niro) is a psychic who comes out of retirement and poses a threat to two academics, Margaret Matheson (Sigourney Weaver) and Tom Buckley (Cillian Murphy), who are wary of all claims to the supernatural.
Millennium Entertainment

Of all the hustlers who present cheap tricks as "magic," few are more shameless than filmmakers. Under the cover of "It's only a movie," directors and screenwriters exhort the gullible to believe in ghosts, telekinesis, extraterrestrials and such.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

'The Imposter': Tell Me Lies, Tell Me Sweet Little Lies

Frederic Bourdin, played here by Adam O'Brian in a reenactment, is the subject of The Imposter, a movie about how the French-born Bourdin pretended to be missing Texan Nicholas Barclay, a boy six years younger.
Indomina Releasing

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 2:38 pm

On June 13, 1994, 13-year-old Nicholas Barclay went missing from his home outside San Antonio, Texas.

Nearly four years later, his family received a phone call from Linares, Spain, informing them that their son had been found, scared and confused; the U.S. Embassy made arrangements for the Barclays to reunite with him and bring him back home.

And that's exactly what happened: Nicholas' sister hopped on a plane, drove to the orphanage and embraced a reticent teenager who'd been changed profoundly by age and some unknown, unspeakable trauma.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

A Humble Servant, Watching As The Throne Totters

Gabrielle de Polignac (Virginie Ledoyen, left) is the close, possibly intimate, friend of Marie Antoinette (Diane Kruger) — and the two are the bane of the approaching revolutionaries in Farewell, My Queen.
Carole Bethuel Cohen Media Group

In 1995's A Single Girl, probably his best known film in the U.S., Benoit Jacquot tracks a young chambermaid through one workday as she ponders a big decision. The French writer-director's smart and ultimately wrenching Farewell, My Queen takes a similar course — only this time the protagonist toils for Queen Marie Antoinette, and the story opens on July 14, 1789.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

'Margaret': The Tortured Journey Of A Girl, On Screen

Sarah Steele, Anna Paquin and Matthew Broderick in Margaret. The DVD release of Kenneth Lonergan's long-delayed second film includes the theatrical version and an extended 186-minute cut.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:56 am

"A fiasco with a great first half" is what I called Kenneth Lonergan's Margaret when it was dumped in one New York theater last fall, five years after it was shot, amid a legal battle between Lonergan and a producer.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Whatever The Country, No Such Thing As 'Easy Money'

Mrado (Dragomir Mrsic) is the enforcer for a Serbian drug cartel that controls business in Sweden, and one of three characters who clash in Easy Money.
Weinstein Company

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 7:57 am

Easy Money is a fine title for a film, but to truly savor the tang of this top-drawer Scandinavian thriller, try rolling its original Swedish title off your tongue. Say hello to Snabba Cash.

Director Daniel Espinosa starts his splendid crime story all in a rush, throwing us right into the middle of a trio of chaotic situations.

Introduced first is Jorge, a Chilean living in Sweden — in fact in a Swedish prison. Making his escape, Jorge promptly goes into hiding, as much from other local bad guys as from the police.

Read more
Asia
3:02 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Global Markets Brace For China's Slowing Economy

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:10 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Global stock markets are anxiously awaiting new figures from China. Analysts are expecting the numbers to show the world's second largest economy suffering its biggest slowdown since the global financial crisis.

NPR's Louisa Lim is in Beijing.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
3:01 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

WHO Says Virus Caused Illnesses In Cambodia

Cambodian children and their parents sitting at Kantha Bopha Children's Hospital in Phnom Penh on July 5.
Khem Sovannara AFP/Getty Images

Where do things stand with the outbreak of illnesses in Cambodia that landed scores of children in the hospital and was implicated in the deaths of more than 50? Here's a roundup of the latest info.

.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Humans
2:58 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

How Stereotypes Can Drive Women To Quit Science

Ayodhya Ouditt NPR

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 6:29 pm

Walk into any tech company or university math department, and you'll likely see a gender disparity: Fewer women than men seem to go into fields involving science, engineering, technology and mathematics.

Read more
World Cafe: Latin Roots
2:53 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Latin Roots: More To Mariachi Than You Think

Rana Santacruz.
Adam Cohen Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 10:53 am

Chicago-based music journalist Catalina Maria Johnson curates this 14th installment of World Cafe's "Latin Roots" music series. The bilingual and bicultural journalist is of half-Swedish and half-Mexican descent, and grew up in two different cities with the name St. Louis — one in Missouri, and the other, in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. She writes in Spanish and English for publications such as HOY, Revista Contratiempo, Gozamos and Nat Geo Music.

Read more
Mom And Dad's Record Collection
2:46 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Glen Hansard: Musical Comfort In A Troubled Home

Glen Hansard's latest album is Rhythm and Repose.
Conor Masterson

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:10 pm

All summer long, All Things Considered has been talking to politicians, musicians and others about one song they remember their parents listening to, and how it influenced them.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Sen. Reid On 'Made In China' U.S. Olympic Uniforms: 'Burn Them'

This product image released by Ralph Lauren shows U.S. Olympic athletes, from left, swimmer Ryan Lochte, decathlete Bryan Clay, rower Giuseppe Lanzone and soccer player Heather Mitts modeling the the official Team USA Opening Ceremony Parade Uniform.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:21 pm

Yesterday, ABC News made a curious discovery about the U.S. Olympic uniforms designed by Ralph Lauren: The pride of America, as they put it, will be wearing red, white and blue attire made in China.

"Every item in the uniforms that the U.S. athletes will be wearing at the opening ceremony in London will carry an overseas label," ABC reported.

Read more
World Cafe
2:45 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Mariachi El Bronx On World Cafe

Mariachi El Bronx.
Courtesy of Ashley Maile

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 2:54 pm

Los Angeles-based Mariachi El Bronx started out as a punk band called The Bronx, but that was before its members discovered a collective love for Mexican folk music. The group fell hard for mariachi, and when faced with playing an acoustic punk rock set for a TV show, they decided to fully embrace that new direction and start a Mexican-flavored side project.

Read more
The Salt
2:44 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Three Secrets To Crispy Pickles, And A 'Lost Recipe' Found

Pickling spices, ready for their close-up
Marissa McClellan Food In Jars

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:10 pm

Whether you're a veteran canner or you've just discovered this hot trend and want to get in on National Can It Forward Day this weekend, you know that the ultimate test of a good pickle is whether it's got some crunch to it.

As part of All Things Considered's Lost Recipes series, host Melissa Block talks with listener Joanie Vick, of Nashua, N.H., today. (You can hear the full interview above.)

Read more
Asia
2:41 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Pimp My Rickshaw: India's Drivers Pump Up The Glam

You know you want one: rickshaw seat covers emblazoned with Bollywood stars. It's just one way New Delhi rickshaw drivers are trying to outdo each other in the battle for passengers.
Elliot Hannon for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:10 pm

Dashboard statues of glow-in-the-dark Hindu gods, hubcaps painted like soccer balls and seat covers adorned with Bollywood stars — all this and more rickshaw bling is all the rage in India.

The motorized three-wheeled buggies are a fixture on India's crowded city streets, scooting in and out of traffic, picking up and dropping off passengers.

In New Delhi alone, there are some 50,000 of these vehicles. And that number is set to double as the city recently lifted a decades-long cap on the number of rickshaws allowed on the road.

Read more

Pages