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Business
9:10 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Wal-Mart To Offer Money-Transfer Service

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with wiring from Wal-Mart.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The giant retailer is taking another step into banking. The company says it's launching a money transfer service next week. It'll go head-to-head with Western Union and MoneyGram in a market worth about $900 billion. But Wal-Mart says it will offer lower fees. Western Union and MoneyGram's stock both dropped on the news. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
8:34 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Pakistani Madrassa Names Its Library For Osama Bin Laden

Osama bin Laden is referred to as a shaheed, or martyr, on a sign outside the library at a girls' school in Islamabad.
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 8:54 am

A sign now outside the small library at a religious school for girls in Pakistan's capital says the room has been named for a martyr — Osama bin Laden, whose al-Qaida terrorist network was responsible for the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that killed more than 3,000 people in New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

"For us he was a hero of Islam," a school spokesman tells Agence France-Presse.

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Deal In Doubt As Separatists Refuse To Budge In Ukraine

A masked pro-Russia gunman looks through a window of a regional administration building seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine.
Sergei Grits AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 8:49 am

"Armed pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine said Friday that they were not bound by an international deal ordering them to disarm and were looking for more assurances about their security before leaving the public buildings they are holding," Reuters reports.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Tragedy Atop The World: Everest Avalanche Kills At Least 12

The sun shines on the peak of Mount Everest in this October 2011 photo. On Friday, an avalanche killed at least 12 Sherpas on the mountain.
Kevin Frayer AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:58 am

At least 12 Sherpa guides died Friday on Nepal's side of Mount Everest when an avalanche buried them on the world's tallest mountain.

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Book News: The Celebrity Of Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Nobel Prize-winning novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez appeared in public during a celebration marking his 87th birthday on March 6 in Mexico City. He died Thursday.
Yuri Cortez AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
5:21 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Indiana Man Lets Buyer Keep His Stolen Car

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Kelly McEvers with the story of not one, but two, good Samaritans in Boonville, Indiana. A Chrysler belonging to Derk West was stolen last week. The thief then sold the car to a 72-year-old man for 300 bucks. That buyer started feeling like the deal was too good to be true.

So he looked up the car's rightful owner, Mr. West, gave him a call. Derk West decided the older man needed the car more than he did so he let him keep it. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:06 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Captain Of Korean Ferry Arrested As Vessel Sinks Below Surface

Cranes, ships and other rescue equipment are on the scene off the southern coast of South Korea, where a ferry capsized Wednesday. About 270 people, most of them high school students, remain missing.
Kim Hong-Ji Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 2:28 pm

The captain of the South Korean ferry that sank earlier this week in the Yellow Sea, leaving at least 28 dead and hundreds missing, has been arrested, along with two other crew members, South Korea's Yonhap news agency says.

The 69-year-old captain, Lee Jun-Seok, faces five counts including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law, Yonhap says.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Fri April 18, 2014

'During The Reign,' A Dissolving Family Retells Its History

Joan Chase is the author of two novels and a collection of short stories.
Alexander Solomita Courtesy of Joan Chase

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:55 am

A meditation on the lives of one multigenerational family in rural 1950s Ohio, Joan Chase's 1983 debut During the Reign of the Queen of Persia — just reissued — opens up a typical pastoral story with the inventiveness of four young girls, the novel's narrators. Directed by sisters Anne and Katie, and their cousins Celia and Jenny, the narration traces the gradual dissolution of the Krauss family from their grandmother's childhood to the end of their own, after a lifetime on their Ohio farm.

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Business
4:40 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Obama Wants To Sell Exports To Asia, But Critics Aren't Buying

Members of Japan's farmers association protest against the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade talks at a rally in Tokyo in March 2013.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 12:00 pm

Next week, President Obama is going to Asia, where he'll talk up a proposed deal to increase U.S. trade with that region.

If he succeeds, he could open up huge new markets for U.S. farmers and manufacturers, strengthen U.S. influence in Asia and set a path to greater prosperity.

At least, that's what the White House says.

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Politics
4:36 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Chelsea Clinton Announces She's Pregnant

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Well, the tabloids have been reporting it for years but now it is official: Chelsea Clinton is actually pregnant this time. New York magazine proclaimed that America's version of a royal baby is on the way. Chelsea's parents, Bill and Hillary, sent out tweets confirming the news. The former president wrote that he is excited to add a new line to his Twitter bio: grandfather-to-be. And, of course, now speculation on the 2064 presidential race can begin.

Shots - Health News
4:33 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Why Mumps And Measles Can Spread Even When We're Vaccinated

Potent but not perfect: Medical assistant Elissa Ortivez prepares a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at a clinic in Walsenburg, Colo.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:09 pm

More than two months ago, a nasty mumps virus triggered fever, headache and painfully swollen glands among a handful of students at Ohio State University. Now the outbreak has ballooned to 234 cases at last count, and has spilled into the surrounding community in Columbus, Ohio.

"Columbus officials are calling it the city's biggest outbreak since the development of the mumps vaccine in the 1940s," WOSU reporter Steve Brown tells Shots. "It even pushed them to open a new clinic."

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Business
4:25 am
Fri April 18, 2014

'Leftover Women' Blamed For China's Surplus Of Unmarried Men

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

In China there's a phrase that refers to a certain demographic: Educated professional women in their late 20s or a little older who are still single. They're called Leftover Women.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: This group of women is growing rapidly in the cities. They're facing an unprecedented unmarried crisis.

MCEVERS: An unmarried crisis. That's from Chinese state TV. Newspapers also use the phrase, which was coined by the government a few years back. Sociologist Leta Hong Fincher tracks how Leftover Women is used in the media.

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Business
4:23 am
Fri April 18, 2014

IPO Market Shows Signs Of Strain

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, Virtu Financial has reportedly decided to postpone its initial public offering. The decision comes during a week when several IPOs in U.S. markets had disappointing debuts. Virtu conducts high-frequency electronic trading on various exchanges and scrutiny of high-speed trading is growing.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Plunge In Circulation Forces Changes At Japanese Magazine

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Wonderful Wife.

It's the name of a women's magazine in Japan. It used to be a top seller back when more women stayed home and took care of their kids.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

But times have changed. As more women work even after having kids, Wonderful Wife has plunged in circulation. So the publisher says it's taking Wonderful Wife off the racks and replacing it with a new magazine aimed at working mothers.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Inmates To Be Moved Temporarily Out Of Infamous Iraqi Prison

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

And I'm Kelly McEvers. It's a name that conjures up grim images. Abu Ghraib prison. Once the site of prisoner abuse and torture, first under Saddam Hussein then under U.S. occupation, the prison temporarily closed this week. The decision comes as a Sunni-led insurgency in Western Iraq, near Abu Ghraib, is targeting Iraq's Shiite-led government in Baghdad.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Colombia Mourns Death Of Favorite Son: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

If you think about the country of Columbia, you might think about turmoil - drug trafficking and violence - but a native son countered those notions with dream-like, whimsical storytelling. Nobel Prize-winning author, Gabriel Garcia Marquez died yesterday at the age of 87. Juan Forero visited his hometown.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Budget Cuts Threaten Mock Villages At Military Training Center

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

America has learned a lot about fighting wars over the past decade. And you can see how they apply the lessons learned at the Fort Irwin National Training Center in Southern California. The military still holds old-style war games there, with tanks and planes. But the war scenarios also reflect the recent challenges faced in places like Iraq and Afghanistan.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Many Sunken Ferry Victims Believed To Be Trapped Below Deck

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Author Interviews
2:15 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Sen. Elizabeth Warren Writes Of A Worldview Shaped In Youth

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren became an unlikely media star following the 2008 financial crisis.

She was a plainspoken law professor from Harvard who advocated on behalf of families and consumers affected by the Wall Street meltdown.

Warren was brought to Washington to help monitor the multibillion-dollar bank bailout package.

As part of that work, Warren helped to create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau — a watchdog agency that oversees and enforces consumer finance laws.

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Monkey See
1:36 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Tatiana Maslany On Looking Herself In The Eye

Tatiana Maslany plays Sarah, as well as some other characters, on BBC America's Orphan Black.
Steve Wilkie BBC America

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Tatiana Maslany plays Sarah — and some other people — on BBC America's sci-fi show Orphan Black. On Friday's Morning Edition, she speaks to Kelly McEvers about how she manages to play all those different women from different cultural backgrounds, not to mention women with different mixes of malevolence and likability. Technically, it's no picnic: Just ask the tennis ball that sometimes plays her head.

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StoryCorps
1:34 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Born With HIV, Building A Future

Cristina Peña was born with HIV. In high school, she was afraid to tell her boyfriend, Chris Ondaatje, about her illness. The couple have been together for 13 years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Cristina Peña was born in 1984 with HIV. Her father died from AIDS, and her mother is still living with HIV. Cristina was told she had HIV when she was 9, but she and her family kept it a secret from her schoolmates and friends.

In high school, she started dating Chris Ondaatje. One day, Chris decided to tell Cristina that he was in love with her.

That's when Cristina sat him down for a revelation of her own.

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Parallels
1:33 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Sunni Discontent Fuels Growing Violence In Iraq's Anbar Province

Iraqi Sunni masked protesters burn tires to block the main highway to Jordan and Syria, outside Fallujah, Iraq, on Dec. 30. Violence has returned to Iraq's Anbar province, with discontented ordinary Sunnis joining forces with al-Qaida-linked militants battling the Iraqi government.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Violence has reignited in western Iraq, with Islamist fighters taking over much of Anbar province three months ago. A renegade al-Qaida group has set up its headquarters in Fallujah — the city where hundreds of U.S. soldiers died a decade ago, trying to wrest it from insurgent control.

But this time, the enemy isn't the U.S. and it's not just extremists fighting. Ordinary Sunnis in Anbar, furious at what they call years of discrimination by the Shiite-dominated government, have joined the militants' battle against the Iraqi army.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:31 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students.
Maisie Crow

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

The investigative journalism group ProPublica, with reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, has just completed a yearlong project, Segregation Now, exploring the re-segregation of schools in the U.S., with a particular look at Tuscaloosa, Ala.

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Monkey See
7:10 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Is 'Heaven' Real, Or Just A Place On Earth?

Colton Burpo (Connor Corum) tells Todd (Greg Kinnear) about heaven in Heaven Is for Real.
Allen Fraser Sony Pictures

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 6:20 am

Heaven Is for Real has an earnestness and an inertness that make it something of a bulletproof fish in a barrel. It's easy to take shots at because it's utterly artless and corny, but it's immune to criticism because it's not intended to be otherwise. It's simply intended to be affirming to people who go to church a lot, encouraging to people who go to church a little, and inoffensively irrelevant to people who don't go to church at all.

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The Two-Way
6:42 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

'Completely Unique': Cave-Dwelling Female Insects Have Penises

Made for a tight grip: The female penis of an insect species newly discovered in Brazil has spines on it.
Courtesy of Current Biology, Yoshizawa et al.

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 10:51 pm

Four new insect species found in Brazil have rather strange sex lives — to say the least. Their sex organs are reversed: Females have penises and males have vaginas, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Current Biology.

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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Even Chimps Know That A Firm Bed Makes For Quality Sleep

A chimpanzee hangs from a tree trunk in Kibale National Park in Uganda. A new study indicates that chimps prefer a specific tree for sleeping.
James Akena Reuters/Landov

In the wilds of Africa, chimpanzees consistently choose to make their sleeping nests in a particular tree that offers the "just right" kind of comfort that Goldilocks famously preferred.

That's according to a new study in the journal PLOS ONE that could also bolster a theory that solid shut-eye may have been a key to human evolution.

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The Salt
4:22 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

Jelly Belly says its most popular flavors include the savory-sweet Buttered Popcorn and Very Cherry.
Meg Vogel/NPR

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:11 am

This Easter, you can drown your sorrows in a glass of Jellybean milk — or with a pile of beer-flavored jelly beans.

The new twists are a sign that jelly beans are continuing their march to candyland domination. Americans buy 16 billion beans in the Easter season alone (mid-February until the actual holiday), according to the National Confectioners Association. The candy even has its own holiday on April 22.

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Politics
4:02 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Obama's Favorite County — At Least When It Comes To Giving Speeches

President Obama speaks during an April 7 visit to Bladensburg High School in Bladensburg, Md. It was his fourth visit to Prince George's County in as many months.
Aude Guerrucci-Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:11 pm

Residents of Prince George's County, Md., might just get sick of hearing "Hail to the Chief." President Obama has visited this county to deliver policy addresses more than any other in his second term.

"Hello Maryland. It's good to see you," the president said enthusiastically in January at a Costco in Lanham, Md. "I love to get outside of the Beltway, even if it is just a few hundred feet away."

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Around the Nation
3:26 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

The Ohio Snake Art That's Been Mid-Slither For A Millennium

The Serpent Mound in southern Ohio is 3 feet high and more than 1,300 feet long.
Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society.

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

In new installment of the Spring Break series, Noah Adams visits the Serpent Mound in southern Ohio. It's not a burial site; it's a massive, grass-covered effigy of a snake, created a thousand years ago.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
3:26 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

When Being Pregnant Also Means Being Out Of A Job

While many women continue to work with little change in their duties while pregnant, others find that pregnancy can be a career liability.
Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

The workplace has become a more understanding place for pregnant women or new moms these days. Many companies now have lactation rooms and offer more liberal maternity and paternity leave policies than in years past.

But for some women, pregnancy can still be a career liability.

Heather Myers was fresh out of high school and working at a Wal-Mart in Salina, Kan., in 2006 when she found out she was pregnant. She kept a water bottle with her on the sales floor, as her doctor recommended. Then, her supervisor intervened.

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