Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
9:54 am
Sat October 25, 2014

New Incan Find One-Ups Peru's Famous 12 Angle Stone

With 13 angles, a stone has been found by researchers in Peru that could undermine the famous 12-Angle Stone that has drawn thousands of tourists.
Peru's Ministry of Culture

Hundreds of years after it was precisely carved and placed into a wall, a stone has been found in Peru that could undermine the country's famous 12 Angle Stone.

Researchers say the stone is part of "a hydraulic system built at the archaeological site Inkawasi in Huancavelica," hundreds of miles from the other stone that has long been revered as a paragon of the Incas' intricate masonry.

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The Two-Way
8:52 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Details Emerge About Washington State High School Shooting

Community members and students from Marysville-Pilchuck High School gather for a vigil at the Grove Church in Marysville, Wash., Friday night. Two students died in the violence, including the gunman. Several more were wounded.
David Ryder Getty Images

One day after gun violence took two lives and wounded four other people in Marysville, Wash., we're learning more about the gunman and the scene of panic that erupted in a high school cafeteria Friday morning. Students of Marysville-Pilchuck High School describe a desperate scene -– and a member of the school's staff is being credited with helping to prevent more killing.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Health Care Worker Tests Negative For Ebola In NJ, Stays In Quarantine

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 10:01 am

A woman who was put in isolation at Newark Liberty International Airport remains under quarantine, despite a preliminary test that found she did not have the deadly Ebola virus.

The health care worker was isolated Friday as she returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa. She had no symptoms of the disease, but after she developed a fever, she was taken to a nearby hospital.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

At 113, Woman Lies About Her Age So She Can Join Facebook

Facebook's log-in page currently doesn't allow a date earlier than Jan. 1, 1905, to be selected.
Facebook

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 11:21 am

Since her birth in 1900, Anna Stoehr has seen dramatic shifts in technology. But when the Minnesota woman tried recently to create a Facebook account, she hit a snag. The service's software couldn't handle her advanced age of 113 years old. So she fudged it a bit, and said she was 99.

To put Stoehr's age in context, we'll remind you: She was born three years before the Wright brothers conducted their historic first flight of an airplane in North Carolina.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Survey: Latin America Ranks Last In Respect For Women

Demonstrators call for more protection for women in Colombia last spring. Only 20 percent of respondents in the country said they feel women are respected there. One protester holds a sign reading "Woman, neither submissive, nor devout. I want you free, pretty and crazy."
Raul Arboleda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 3:09 pm

For the second consecutive year, a wide survey found people in Latin America are the least likely to say they live in countries where women are treated with respect and dignity, ranking below the Middle East and North Africa.

The Gallup survey found a wide range of opinions within Latin America: while 63 percent of respondents in Ecuador said women get respect, only 20 percent said the same in Peru and Colombia.

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The Two-Way
8:01 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Kim Jong Un Makes First Public Appearance In More Than A Month

A photo released Monday by the Rodong Sinmun, newspaper of the ruling Workers' Party, shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walking with a cane as he visits a residential area in Pyongyang.
Rodong Sinmun EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 8:31 am

After 40 days of seclusion, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has made a public appearance, an outing that could help quell rumors about his health and status. Kim visited a new housing complex, according to state media that released photos of the event — but without attaching a specific date to it.

North Korea has confirmed only that Kim has been in "discomfort." The newly released photos show Kim using a cane, possibly confirming theories that he underwent ankle surgery. More than a month ago, he was seen limping as he walked.

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The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

'A Strange Situation' Indeed: Leech Spends Weeks In Woman's Nose

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 2:32 pm

Mr. Curly. That's the name Daniela Liverani gave to the 3-inch leech that doctors found living in her nostril last week. With that tone of creepiness established, we can now provide more details to a story that might have you giving the old schnozz a closer look the next time you see a mirror.

It took a medical team about 30 minutes to remove the leech; Liverani believes it had been living in there for about a month.

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

North Carolina And Alaska Issue Same-Sex Marriage Licenses

Lynda Johnson (center) cries as she watches her daughter Kandyce Johnson (left) marry Jana Downs in Charlotte, N.C., on Monday. Same-sex couples lined up to get marriage licenses Monday, the first day Mecklenburg County issued the licenses.
Jeff Siner MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 6:25 pm

Same-sex couples in Alaska and North Carolina are receiving marriage licenses, after courts in those states recently overturned bans on gay marriage. The two states are part of the cascading effects of the Supreme Court's refusal to review any appeals in same-sex marriage cases in its current term.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Mon October 13, 2014

Ebola Screening At JFK Airport Flagged 91 Travelers; None Had Virus

A plane arrives at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport. Since Ebola screenings began Saturday, none of the 91 passengers identified as having an increased risk of an Ebola infection was found to be sick, the CDC says.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 1:15 pm

Newly instituted screening procedures at New York's JFK International Airport identified 91 arriving passengers as having a higher risk of being infected with Ebola based on their recent travel, CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said Monday. None of the airline passengers had a fever, Frieden said, noting that of five people who were sent for further evaluation, none were determined to have Ebola.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Mon October 13, 2014

North Korea Says Thousands Of U.S. Soldiers' Remains Are At Risk

The remains of thousands of U.S. soldiers who died in the Korean War are "left here and there uncared and carried away en masse," a North Korean military spokesman said Monday.

He said the remains are being put at risk by large construction projects – and by the halting of joint recovery efforts. North Korea is estimated to contain the remains of more than 5,000 American soldiers.

From Seoul, Jason Strother reports:

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Mon October 13, 2014

Pistorius Should Serve 3 Years' House Arrest, Prison Official Says

June Steenkamp (left), mother of Oscar Pistorius' slain girlfriend, Reva Steenkamp, leaves the Pretoria High Court after Monday's sentencing hearing for the South African athlete. A prison official recommended house arrest for Pistorius.
Stefan Heunis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 12:07 pm

At a sentencing hearing for Oscar Pistorius, a court-appointed prison social worker says the South African athlete's punishment for culpable homicide should include three years of house arrest.

Pistorius shot and killed his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, in his home last year. The former Olympian was found not guilty of murder last month.

From Pretoria, reporter Nastasya Tay filed this story for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Mon October 13, 2014

U.S. Strikes At ISIS In Kobani As Kurds Claim Progress

Smoke rises after a U.S.-led coalition airstrike on Kobani, Syria, Monday, as seen from the Turkish side of the border. Kurdish fighters say they're making progress against ISIS in the area.
Tolga Bozoglu EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 2:06 pm

The besieged city of Kobani, Syria, has seen an increase in air strikes and fighting, with Kurdish fighters in the area saying they've stopped the extremist group ISIS from advancing. As the U.S.-led coalition carried out strikes on areas east and south of Kobani, new reports emerged about Turkey's role in supporting the fight against ISIS.

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Mon October 13, 2014

French Economist Wins Nobel For Work On Regulating Big Business

French economist Jean Tirole won the Nobel prize for economics Monday for research on market power and regulation in industries dominated by a few powerful companies. The undated photo was provided by the Toulouse School of Economics.
AP

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 11:15 am

Saying that he "clarified how to understand and regulate industries with a few powerful firms," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in economic sciences to Jean Tirole, who teaches at the Toulouse School of Economics. He studies oligopolies, markets that are controlled by a handful of powerful (and interdependent) companies.

"I was very surprised, I was incredibly surprised," Tirole said shortly after he received the phone call informing him of the win. "The honor... it took me half an hour to recoup from the call. I still haven't recouped yet."

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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

Striking Mosaic Found In Greek Tomb Dates From 4th Century B.C.

The Greek god Hermes is seen in a newly found mosaic, leading a chariot and its rider into the afterlife.
Greek Culture Ministry

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 4:29 pm

Archaeologists have uncovered an intricate and beautiful floor mosaic in a large tomb in northern Greece. Dating from the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., the mosaic covers a space of nearly 15 feet by 10 feet. It features two horses, a man and the god Hermes; it was found in a tomb that was discovered in August.

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The Two-Way
10:51 am
Sun October 12, 2014

Cyclone Hudhud Blasts India With Winds Topping 120 MPH

Power cables are seen snapped after the severe cyclone storm Hudhud swept through India's southern city of Visakhapatnam Sunday. Several people died because of the storm, officials say.
Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 4:30 pm

Hundreds of thousands of people are seeking safety on India's eastern coast, fleeing a powerful storm that made landfall Sunday morning. Cyclone Hudhud is being blamed for several deaths after it struck the port city of Visakhapatnam (often called Vizag), destroying shops and snapping power lines along the coast of the Bay of Bengal.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Sun October 12, 2014

In St. Louis, A Rally And Protests Over Police Shootings

Protesters sit silently for over four minutes at the Ferguson Police Department Saturday, during a rally in remembrance of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. While the demonstration was peaceful, police arrested protesters elsewhere.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 5:26 pm

Responding to a call to gather in St. Louis for a weekend event called Ferguson October, more than 1,000 people are hitting the city's streets to protest the recent killing of young black men by police. While most of the gatherings have been peaceful, some arrests took place last night.

Michael Brown, 18, was shot and killed by a police officer in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson two months ago this weekend.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Sun October 12, 2014

U.S. And Other Nations Pledge $5.4 Billion To Rebuild Gaza

At a Cairo aid conference to help rebuild Gaza, Secretary of State John Kerry paused to rub his eyes Sunday. The U.S. is promising another $212 million in aid.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 5:27 pm

A one-day conference in Cairo has brought pledges of some $5.4 billion to help rebuild Gaza, the Palestinian territory whose infrastructure was crippled in 50 days of fighting between Hamas and Israel. The figure far surpasses an estimate from Palestinians who said the rebuilding project would cost $4 billion. U.S. officials had expressed doubt the meeting would yield that figure.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

The Empire Strikes Back: The Fan-Made Version

To remake The Empire Strikes Back, dozens of fans play roles such as Luke Skywalker and Jedi master Yoda, seen here training on the planet Dagobah.
Star Wars Uncut

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 4:27 pm

Have you seen The Empire Strikes Back Uncut? If you have, there's a chance you're one of the hundreds of fans who contributed their own scenes to recreate the Star Wars classic in full.

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Sat October 11, 2014

New Hepatitis C Pill Promises Faster Treatment, At A Higher Cost

The newly approved Harvoni tablets bring several advances to the fight against hepatitis C, but they also have a steep price tag, reported at $1,125 for a single dose.
Gilead Sciences

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 1:53 pm

The FDA has approved a once-a-day pill that combines two drugs to treat hepatitis C, the deadly virus that attacks the liver and is believed to infect 3.2 million Americans.

The new product brings several advances, but it also has a steep price tag, reported at $1,125 per tablet. NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff reports:

"The treatment, made by Gilead Sciences, bypasses the need for any injections or older drugs that have serious side effects.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Sat October 11, 2014

Republican And Democrat Make Headlines For 'Nicest' Election Race

Scott Hildebrand, a Democrat, and Mike Jansen, a Republican, are competing to be the new sheriff in Campbell County, Ky., but they're also abiding by an agreement to keep their race clean.
Images courtesy of the candidates

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 1:59 pm

Not many political opponents eat breakfast together or sit for a joint interview, but those things are what define the race for Campbell County sheriff in northern Kentucky. That's where Democrat Scott Hildebrand and Republican Mike Jansen are waging "a clean race," as Jansen says, because the voters deserve it.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Sat October 11, 2014

Ebola Deaths Top 4,000; Screening Begins At New York's JFK Airport

Passengers from three West African countries will face screening for Ebola symptoms when they arrive at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. Travelers are seen here at a JFK checkpoint earlier this week. Four other airports will begin screening next week.
JUSTIN LANE EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 12:11 pm

Officials at five busy U.S. airports are putting in place screening measures meant to prevent the spread of the deadly Ebola virus. Screening began at JFK Airport today; it will start at other international airports next week.

The push comes as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced the outbreak has killed at least 4,024 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

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The Two-Way
6:30 am
Sat October 11, 2014

Kmart Says Its Store Registers Were Hacked, Exposing Credit Cards

Kmart says it has removed malware that had infected its checkout registers in stores. The company believes the malware may have been in place for about a month before it was detected.
Rachel Murray Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 12:09 pm

For about a month, Kmart says, its stores' checkout registers were "compromised by malicious software that stole customer credit and debit card information."

The company, owned by Sears, says it removed the malware from its system after it was discovered Thursday. It announced the exposure late Friday, saying that no personal data or PIN numbers were lost.

While some important customer information seems to have been protected, the breach could still allow criminals to make counterfeit versions of the exposed credit cards.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Singer Morrissey Says He Has Had Cancer Treatment

English singer Morrissey performs during the Nobel Peace Prize concert in Oslo in December. The musician told a Spanish newspaper, in a stoic discussion about his health, that he has undergone treatments related to cancer.
Daniel Sannum Lauten AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 11:58 am

Steven Patrick Morrissey, the singer who formerly led The Smiths and is on a solo tour in Europe, has undergone treatment for cancer, he tells a Spanish newspaper. Morrissey did not specify what ailment he had been suffering from, saying only that he had undergone "cancer scrapings."

The singer, 55, was asked about his health in an interview for Spanish newspaper El Mundo.

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The Two-Way
11:58 am
Tue October 7, 2014

In Gay Marriage's New Landscape, Glee, Confusion And Resistance

Kody Partridge (center right) and her partner, Lauri Wood, kiss at a same-sex marriage celebration Monday in Salt Lake City. The status of gay marriage remains uncertain in Kansas and Wyoming, where officials say no court has ruled on their ban specifically.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 1:41 pm

Same-sex couples are marrying in at least six more states today, after the Supreme Court left in place lower courts' rulings against bans on gay marriage. But couples have been turned away in Kansas, one of several states that share federal jurisdiction with states where bans were lifted.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Mon October 6, 2014

Some Americans Boosted Charitable Giving In Recession; The Rich Did Not

During the recession, middle-class and poor Americans gave more of their incomes to charity organizations than did the wealthy, according to a new study.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 10:44 am

As times got tough in the recent recession, the less well-off of America's citizens became more generous when giving to charity. But at the same time, wealthy Americans cut the proportion of their incomes they donated, according to a new study that analyzed data from tax returns.

NPR's Pam Fessler reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Supreme Court Won't Hear Gay Marriage Cases In New Term

The Supreme Court has denied petitions to review same-sex marriage cases in several states, including Utah. In January, supporters of same-sex marriage held a rally at Utah's Capitol in Salt Lake City.
Jim Urquhart Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 12:15 pm

The Supreme Court's new term will not include any cases that might decide the issue of same-sex marriage in the U.S., a development that comes after many lower and appeals courts have ruled against states' bans on gay marriage. Advocates on both sides of the issue have been calling for the high court to review the issue and make an official ruling.

The court's refusal of all the petitions related to bans on gay marriage means that the appeals courts' decisions allowing gay marriage can now take effect. They had been on hold pending a potential review by the Supreme Court.

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Hewlett-Packard Will Split Into Two Companies

Meg Whitman, the current president and CEO of Hewlett-Packard, will lead one of the two companies the tech giant is creating by dividing its corporate services and printing/PC units.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 4:30 pm

Computer giant Hewlett-Packard, a stalwart through decades of shifts in America's technology landscape, is dividing itself into two companies in its most drastic attempt yet to adjust to new markets.

The ailing company that was founded 75 years ago in a Palo Alto garage was synonymous with Silicon Valley.

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Sat October 4, 2014

Photo Break: America Puts On Its Fall Colors

A striking image of autumn trees lining a drive in Vermont.
reinschreiber Instagram

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 7:03 pm

October brings the peak of the autumn foliage season in many U.S. states, drawing both tourists and camera lenses. Thanks to the NPR community, we've collected a few photos that are worth taking a break from the news to stare at.

The photos were taken in a variety of states — except, of course, those where the season hasn't begun to turn. If you're heading out to see the autumn views, the USDA has a map showing where the leaves are turning; in many states, local agencies can provide more tailored information.

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The Two-Way
11:03 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Haiti's 'Baby Doc' Duvalier Dies At 63

Former Haitian president Jean-Claude Duvalier "Baby Doc" has died at age 63. He returned from exile in 2011.
Hector Retamal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 12:46 pm

Jean-Claude Duvalier, the former Haitian dictator nicknamed "Baby Doc" after he succeeded his father in ruling the country, has died. Duvalier was the president of Haiti from 1971 to 1986, a brutal regime that ended in his exile. He returned to the country in 2011.

Duvalier died of a heart attack, reports Haiti Libre.

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Dallas Ebola Case: Experts Say 9 People At Highest Risk Of Contact

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins, right, escorts people who were at the apartment unit where Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian citizen diagnosed with the Ebola virus, had been staying. Jenkins used his car to drive the people to a new place to stay in Dallas.
JIM YOUNG Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 12:37 pm

Of the 114 people whom officials first thought could possibly have been exposed to the Liberian man diagnosed with Ebola in Texas, health experts are "fairly certain" that only nine had enough direct contact that they could potentially have been infected.

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