KRWG

Eyder Peralta

The buses line up at the Invepi refugee camp in northern Uganda.

One after the other they drop off dozens of South Sudanese seeking refuge on this side of the border.

They come off carrying whatever possessions they still have: sometimes that means empty plastic jugs, sometimes it means chickens that provide food along the way. Many of the refugees are barefoot. When they've finished with their registration and vaccinations, some just sit there, staring into space.

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Somalia, a place without much of a functioning government, has elected a new president. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports that after a process full of corruption and security issues, the country delivered a surprising result.

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Downtown Nairobi is a bustling scene of people darting across the road and a long line of matatus — little- and medium-sized buses — waiting for passengers.

John Macharia owns two of those buses and he loves the work. Matatus, he says, are essential to Nairobi.

But, Macharia says, they're often targeted by police for the smallest infractions.

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The streets of Dadaab in northern Kenya are crowded with people and cars. You find refugees selling goats and shaving ice.

The biggest refugee camp in the world is basically a mega village. The mostly Somali refugees sell pots and pans and make colorful headscarves on manual sewing machines.

In one store, a group of refugees are having an intense conversation. It is, of course, about President Trump.

Kenya is gearing up for what will no doubt be a contentious presidential election this August.

The halls of the Kiambu County Hospital just outside Nairobi are empty. This is normally a bustling place but on Thursday entire wings are closed.

Only in the emergency room are there a scattering of patients. Moms with babies sit languidly on metal chairs. Men with broken bones and some with serious injuries are just hoping to be treated.

When he was in prison, Lorenzo Palma strongly suspected he was an American citizen. He had spent his whole life in the United States, and he knew his grandfather was born in El Paso, Texas, in 1914.

Palma had served five years for an assault conviction and was about to be released on parole, but immigration officials had stopped his release because they wanted to deport him. They said he wasn't a U.S. citizen.

A bipartisan group of four senators is calling for Congress to take a closer look at allegations that Russia used cyberattacks to try to influence the American election in favor of Donald Trump.

The reports should "alarm every American," Sens. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.; Jack Reed, D-R.I.; John McCain, R-Ariz.; and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said in a joint statement.

Just as the recount that he requested came to a conclusion, incumbent North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory conceded the gubernatorial election to Democratic state Attorney General Roy Cooper.

The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction of the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.

A police officer in Charlotte, N.C., will not face charges in the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott.

Scott's death in September unleashed two days of unrest in Charlotte, when protesters took to the streets and in some cases threw objects at police and smashed windows.

R. Andrew Murray, the Mecklenburg County district attorney, said during a news conference Wednesday that he was "entirely convinced" that Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Officer Brentley Vinson "was lawful in using deadly force."

Donald Trump had a wide-ranging talk with New York Times journalists on Tuesday.

The president-elect disavowed the alt-right — a movement with views widely considered anti-Semitic and white supremacistand also dismissed concerns about his potential conflicts of interests. Times journalists live tweeted the meeting. Here are some highlights:

Danny Heinrich, a 53-year-old man who admitted to killing 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling in 1989, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison.

As we've reported, Heinrich admitted to the murder almost three decades after Wetterling went missing.

The police officer who shot and killed Philando Castile in a St. Paul, Minn., suburb in July has been charged with second-degree manslaughter.

Ramsey County Attorney John Choi said the use of force by St. Anthony police Officer Jeronimo Yanez was not justified. A review of dashboard camera video revealed that "no reasonable officer" would have used deadly force in this circumstance, Choi said.

Army Pfc. Chelsea Manning is asking President Obama to grant her clemency saying she is requesting "a first chance at life."

Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison after perpetrating one of the largest leaks of classified information in U.S. history.

Gwen Ifill, one of the most prominent political journalists in the country, has died, according to PBS. She was 61.

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The legalization of marijuana continued to expand as several states voted to legalize recreational and medical marijuana.

By a wide margin, California and Massachusetts voted to legalize recreational pot on Tuesday. Arkansas, North Dakota and Florida voted to legalize medical marijuana.

It's still too early to tell which way ballot initiatives in Arizona, Maine, Montana and Nevada will go. But the trend is positive for those in favor of legalizing marijuana and it's also part of a larger trend across the country.

The 2016 presidential race is a lot closer than any of the polls predicted. The day started with pundits focused on Donald Trump's narrow path to winning, but as polls closed, the tides turned and now, it's Hillary Clinton with the narrow path to victory.

Updated at 12:55 a.m. ET Wednesday

At least one person was killed and two others were critically injured in a shooting incident near two polling places in Azusa, Calif., on Tuesday.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, which has taken over the investigation, tweeted that the incident "does not appear to have any direct connection to the election/polling places."

Daniel Ortega, the former Marxist revolutionary leader, handily won a third presidential term in Nicaragua.

With almost 70 percent of the precincts reporting, Ortega received 72 percent of the vote. The Liberal Constitutional Party received 14 percent of the vote.

Of course, this result was very much expected, because earlier this year, courts essentially blocked the leading opposition coalition candidates from participating in the election.

The final presidential debate was fast-moving with candidates clashing. Trump made waves early with a racially loaded sentence on immigration. "We have some bad hombres here," he said. "And we're going to get them out." Trump defended Russia's Putin and Syria's Assad and suggested he may not accept the results of the election. Much like the first debate, Clinton was on the offense, attacking Trump on his treatment of women and his temperament. She contrasted their records: While she was in the Situation Room getting bin Laden, Trump, she said, was on Celebrity Apprentice.

During the final presidential debate, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump clashed over Russia.

Responding to a question about one of her speeches released by WikiLeaks, Clinton pivoted by saying Trump should disavow Russia. Trump responded by saying it would not be a bad thing if Russia and the United States got along and that Russian President Vladimir Putin has no respect for Clinton.

"That's because he'd rather have a puppet as president," Clinton replied, sparking one of the fiercest confrontations during the debate thus far.

Here's the clip:

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was noncommittal when he was asked if he would accept the results of the November elections.

"I will keep you in suspense," Trump said during the final presidential debate. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton said she was "appalled" by his response.

Here's the clip:

If you thought Congress was done probing Hillary Clinton's email scandal, Rep. Jason Chaffetz, of Utah, has some news for you.

The Republican chair of the House Oversight committee told Fox News that new evidence turned over by the FBI pointed to a "quid pro quo" arrangement between the FBI and the State Department and that was grounds for at least "four new hearings" after Congress comes back from recess.

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