Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Pages

Business
2:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Comcast, Time Warner Push For Merger Approval Amid Opposition

Federal regulators are considering whether to approve the proposed $45 billion merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 6:17 am

Officials of Comcast and Time Warner Cable met Wednesday with federal regulators to discuss the companies' proposed $45 billion merger. The deal would create a single company that would control large parts of the cable TV and broadband Internet markets.

A published report said recently that Justice Department staff members have decided to oppose the deal on antitrust grounds. But company officials are using a lot of firepower to get the deal approved.

Read more
Europe
5:47 am
Sun April 19, 2015

Greece Risks Losing Future Bailout Funds

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 9:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Economy
2:21 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

New Asian Development Bank Seen As Sign Of China's Growing Influence

Chinese Finance Minister Lou Jiwei (left) speaks during the signing ceremony of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, Oct. 24, in Beijing.
Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:54 pm

China says 57 countries have signed on as charter members of the new China-backed Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. They include some of the United States' closest allies, which added their names despite pressure from the White House not to join.

The Obama administration is concerned the new bank will compete with Western-led institutions like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, but leaders of those institutions don't seem to be worried.

Read more
Business
2:13 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Shell's Big Deal Could Shift Global Landscape Of Gas Business

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 4:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Business
3:07 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Arkansas Governor Asks Lawmakers To Rework Religious Liberty Bill

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 8:08 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Asia
5:39 am
Sun March 29, 2015

How Singapore Became One Of The Richest Places On Earth

A couple enjoys the view of Singapore's financial center. Conservatives saw Singapore as a free-market success story, but Lee Kuan Yew's government played a big role in the economy.
Wong Maye-E AP

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 8:33 am

Singapore has been called the 20th century's most successful development story.

"I don't think any other economy," says Linda Lim, an economist at the University of Michigan, "even the other Asian tigers, have that a good a statistical record of rapid growth, full employment, with very good social indicators — life expectancy, education, housing, etc. — in the first 20 years," she says.

Read more
Business
2:39 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Kraft, Heinz Merger Brings Together Famous Food Brands

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 6:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Business
1:41 am
Tue March 24, 2015

For Banks 'Too Big To Jail,' Prosecutors Count On A Promise To Behave

The logo of Swiss bank UBS is seen at the company's headquarters in Zurich. U.S. officials are investigating whether UBS and Barclays manipulated currency rates at a time when they were already operating under a deferred prosecution agreement for manipulating interest rates.
Arnd Wiegmann Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:49 pm

Last week, a top Justice Department official issued a tough warning to banks and other corporations that repeatedly commit crimes. She said U.S. officials could do away with their deferred-prosecution agreements.

Such deals allow companies that have broken the law to escape criminal convictions by promising to clean up their act. A new book looks at the role these agreements play in the corporate world.

Read more
Business
4:05 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Lumber Liquidators Defends Its Products After '60 Minutes' Report

A man walks past a Lumber Liquidators store in Philadelphia. The retailer says it stands by its products and will pay for the safety testing of laminate floors.
Matt Slocum AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

Earlier this month, the flooring retailer Lumber Liquidators got the kind of attention companies dread. CBS' 60 Minutes did a story saying the company's products have unsafe levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen.

Read more
Business
2:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Targeting Unions: Right-To-Work Movement Bolstered By Wisconsin

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker became a Republican political star by taking on his state's public employee unions. This week he signed a bill that would weaken private-sector unions.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 8:40 pm

This week, Wisconsin became the nation's 25th right-to-work state. It passed a law saying workers cannot be forced to join labor unions, or pay union dues, to keep a job.

There's a concerted effort in many states to pass laws that would weaken the power of labor unions. But unions and their allies are also fighting back in many places.

Read more
Economy
4:16 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Study Suggests Recession, Recovery Have Not Left The Rich Richer

Maggie Barcellano prepares dinner in January 2014 at her father's house in Austin, Texas. Barcellano, who lives with her father, enrolled in the food stamps program while she works as a home health aide and raises her 3-year-old daughter. A study suggests that social safety nets, including food stamps, helped cushion income losses for middle- and working-class Americans during the recession.
Tamir Kalifa AP

Originally published on Fri February 20, 2015 12:56 pm

The Great Recession exacted a huge toll on people in every income group, and recovering from it has been a long and grueling process.

To some economists, the recovery has exacerbated the very real trend toward income inequality in the United States. French economist Thomas Piketty has noted that between 2009 and 2012 incomes have grown, but almost all of those gains have gone to the wealthiest 1 percent.

It's a claim that has been repeated often, but Steven Rose of George Washington University says it needs to be put in perspective.

Read more
Business
4:26 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Obama's Plan To Tax Overseas Earnings Draws Scrutiny

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 10:01 am

American companies have about $2 trillion in overseas accounts — money they could be using to hire workers and pay dividends in the United States. But they're reluctant to do so, in part because of the way the U.S. tax system works.

Read more
Business
2:48 pm
Mon February 9, 2015

Document Leak Reveals Secret Swiss Bank Accounts

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 4:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
11:47 pm
Sun February 8, 2015

Leaked HSBC Documents Shed Light On Swiss Banking Industry

Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 2:59 pm

A huge trove of leaked documents is shedding new light on the secretive Swiss banking industry.

The documents were downloaded by a former computer security expert at the giant bank HSBC, and they were released over the weekend by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

Read more
Business
2:37 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

Standard & Poor's To Pay Over $1 Billion In Legal Settlement

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 4:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Law
10:27 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Justice Dept. Settles S&P Lawsuit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
Business
4:10 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Some Businesses Say Immigrant Workers Are Harder To Find

Fieldale Farms in Gainesville, Ga., says it can't keep enough workers to meet demand for its poultry products, despite paying $16 per hour plus benefits.
Jim Zarroli NPR

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 8:07 am

At Fieldale Farms in Gainesville, Ga., workers cut up chicken breasts and feed the parts into machines. The pieces are then marinated, breaded and eventually sold to restaurants.

The work here can be physically demanding. Not a lot of people want to do it — even though the average wage here is $16 per hour plus benefits.

Tom Hensley, the company president, says Fieldale Farms hires just about anyone who can pass a drug test.

"We hire 100 people a week. Because we have 100 people who quit every week, out of 5,000 employees," he says. "We're constantly short."

Read more
News
4:01 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Auto Loan Surge Fuels Fears Of Another Subprime Crisis

Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 1:41 pm

The number of Americans buying autos approached a record high last year. It's one more sign of how much the economy is improving.

But there's a big potential downside that's evoking comparisons to the subprime mortgage boom. Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit, and more of them are having trouble making payments.

When Chris Westervelt moved from Texas to Alaska to take a job, he decided to trade in his Mazda for a car that could handle snow and ice.

Read more
Law
2:26 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

Standard & Poor's Settles In SEC Ratings Fraud Case

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 5:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
2:58 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Euro Falls To 9-Year Low Against U.S. Dollar

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 4:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:37 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 9:00 am

This year, there will be an important change in the way Americans use their credit cards. More banks will be issuing cards with small computer chips, a move they say will protect against credit card fraud.

But banks are stopping short of another step that will make credit card usage even safer. And a lot of retailers aren't too happy about it.

Read more
Parallels
1:22 am
Wed December 31, 2014

Sanctions Intensify Russia's Free Fall Into Economic Crisis

President Vladimir Putin speaks in Moscow on Dec. 23. Russia's current economic crisis stems from Western sanctions and diving oil prices.
Maxim Shipenkov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 9:39 am

A year ago, Russia's economy was riding high. Today, the country is widely thought to be entering a recession, if it's not already there.

The plunge in oil prices has been the main culprit, but Russia's economy has had trouble regaining its footing because of sanctions imposed by the West after the annexation of Crimea. President Obama and other Western leaders were quick to condemn Russia when it annexed the Crimean Peninsula last March, and they struggled to find a way to show their outrage.

Read more
Economy
4:32 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Opportunity, Caution Seen For U.S. Banks As Cuba Rules Ease

President Obama announces changes to U.S. policy on Cuba, including relaxing restrictions on U.S. banking in the country, in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday.
Doug Mills / Pool EPA/Landov

Among the changes to U.S. restrictions on Cuba President Obama announced Wednesday was a relaxation of the rules barring U.S. banks from doing business there.

Americans traveling in Cuba will now be able to use their credit cards and ATM cards, but many U.S. banks see the new rules as something of a legal minefield.

Read more
Economy
1:36 am
Tue December 16, 2014

'Reshoring' Trend Has Little Impact On U.S. Economy, Study Finds

An "Assembled in the USA" stamp is seen at the side of a box containing a 32-inch television set May 29 in the warehouse of Element Electronics, in Winnsboro, S.C. For the phenomenon of "reshoring," or bringing overseas jobs back to the United States, the electronics sector has been a leader.
Chris Keane Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 2:13 pm

A report on the phenomenon known as "reshoring" — the opposite of offshoring — shows that while a growing number of companies are returning to the United States to do their manufacturing, the trend is smaller and less significant to the economy than it appears.

Read more
Your Money
1:30 am
Mon December 15, 2014

Lockheed Martin Case Puts 401(k) Plans On Trial

Aerospace giant Lockheed Martin is being sued for choosing retirement funds that shortchanged its employees and charged high fees.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 5:16 am

A trial gets under way in St. Louis on Monday that could have a big impact on the way companies select 401(k) plans for their employees.

Lockheed Martin is being sued for choosing retirement funds that shortchanged its employees and charged high fees. The case tests the limits of a company's responsibilities to its employees at a time when 401(k) plans have become a central part of the nation's retirement system.

Read more
Business
3:01 am
Fri November 21, 2014

Senate Panel Probes Fed's Oversight Of Commodity Trading

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 10:46 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Wall Street bankers faced questions before Congress yesterday.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

They're executives from Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Chase.

RATH: And they defended their banks in front of a Senate investigator.

Read more
Business
2:24 pm
Wed November 19, 2014

1 Million American Pension Plans Could Be Insolvent In 10 Years

Originally published on Wed November 19, 2014 4:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
Business
4:36 am
Wed November 19, 2014

Justice Department Charges Georgia Debt Collector With Fraud

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 9:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Business
2:21 pm
Wed November 5, 2014

Business Leaders Hope Shifts In Congress Will Bring Tax Reform

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 8:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Parallels
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Why Deflation Is Such A Big Worry For Europe

A farmer protesting falling prices dumps cauliflower in front of the prefecture building of Saint-Brieuc in northwestern France as police look on Sept. 24.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 8:46 am

Growth is slowing all over the world right now, and that's especially true in Europe. Much of the continent is on the brink of another recession, and even the German economy is sputtering to a halt.

Some of the weakest countries, such as Spain and Italy, are actually experiencing deflation — a broad drop in incomes and asset values. It's a painful process that can be hard to reverse once it starts.

Europe's long, slow economic downturn has taken its toll on Javier Oroz Rodriguez, who owns a butcher shop in downtown Madrid.

Read more

Pages