Linton Weeks

Linton Weeks joined NPR in the summer of 2008, as its national correspondent for Digital News. He immediately hit the campaign trail, covering the Democratic and Republican National Conventions; fact-checking the debates; and exploring the candidates, the issues and the electorate.

Weeks is originally from Tennessee, and graduated from Rhodes College in 1976. He was the founding editor of Southern Magazine in 1986. The magazine was bought — and crushed — in 1989 by Time-Warner. In 1990, he was named managing editor of The Washington Post's Sunday magazine. Four years later, he became the first director of the newspaper's website, Washingtonpost.com. From 1995 until 2008, he was a staff writer in the Style section of The Washington Post.

He currently lives in a suburb of Washington with the artist Jan Taylor Weeks. In 2009, they created The Stone and Holt Weeks Foundation to honor their beloved sons.

Pages

The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Project Xpat: No Tinned Pumpkin

Rowan Crutchlow, at age 3, helping to make her great-grandmother's pie cust.
Kelly Crutchlow

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 10:00 am

Recipes, like memories, transcend place and time. Wherever American Kelly Crutchlow lives, she brings along remembrances of her family and their ways of observing Thanksgiving.

Today Kelly, who is originally from Iowa, is living near Coventry, England, with her British husband, Adam, and their two children, Rowan, 4, and Ewan, 2.

Read more
The Protojournalist
1:33 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Project Xpat: Not So Chilly In Chile

A circle of Thanksgiving celebrants in Santiago, Chile.
Amy Bell

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 2:21 pm

As American expatriate Amy Bell points out, a Thanksgiving celebration does not always depend on falling leaves and falling temperatures. It depends on being full of thanks.

In Chile, Thanksgiving "falls on the brink of summertime," says Amy, a science teacher at an international school in Santiago. "Unfortunately, we don't have the day off from work, so my crew of American expats gather on the following Saturday to enjoy a full day of eating, drinking and gratitude."

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Project Xpat: Homage In Catalonia

Janine Denny of New York readies the Thanksgiving table in Spain
Regan Watson

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 1:16 pm

Sometimes you carry Old Thanksgiving Traditions with you around the world; sometimes you make up Old Thanksgiving Traditions right on the spot.

Regan Watson — an American expat from San Diego now living in Barcelona, Spain — and her friends are creating a few rituals that we homelanders might want to consider.

"For years I had hosted Thanksgiving at my shared Barcelona apartment," Regan says, but "my oven was a bit too small for the 9-kilo turkey that I had to special order."

Read more
The Protojournalist
3:24 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Project Xpat: Thanksgiving In Faraway Lands

Evy Gedlinske, last Thanksgiving.
Michelle Lin

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 9:29 am

For many Americans, the Thanksgiving holiday – with its site-specific sounds, smells, tastes, colors and rituals – is a meaningful, memory-making must-do kind of thing.

Even – maybe, especially – for those Americans living in other countries.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Project Xpat: Exploring The Expatriate Life

Expatriate Ernest Hemingway, 1923
National Archives, via Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 2:20 pm

Funny thing about being an American living away from America: It makes you think more about what it means to be an American.

But which is the dominant sentiment? Absence makes the heart grow fonder? Or out of sight, out of mind? The answer depends on a lot of variables.

Over the years, various people and projects have explored those variables: the mechanics and meanings of expatriation.

One of America's most notable expatriates, novelist Ernest Hemingway, examined the notion from many angles in the 1920s.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:18 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Project Xpat: Recalling Thanksgivings Abroad

Kate Brantley in Lille, France, 2012.
Kate Brantley

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:31 am

When we asked American members of the NPR community who are living in other countries to let us in on their plans for Thanksgiving 2013, we received hundreds and hundreds of responses.

Some expatriates say they plan to trot out the turkey and dressing and Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish. Others say they don't plan to celebrate one whit. Many folks sent us stories and photos of past Thanksgivings spent abroad.

Here are a few examples:

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Who Were You When JFK Was Shot?

A composite image of Rabbi Nancy Fuchs Kreimer, Randall Kennedy and James Billington.
Courtesy of Nancy Fuchs Kreimer, Randall Kennedy and James Billington

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 6:53 pm

The usual question for Americans on an Anniversary of National Significance is: Where Were You When...?

Where Were You When you learned that: Martin Luther King Jr. had been shot on April 4 in 1968? Neil Armstrong walked on the moon on July 21, 1969? The twin towers of the World Trade Center were attacked on Sept. 11, 2001?

But there is another question of orientation: Who Were You When ... a certain nation-changing event occurred?

This is who I was — 50 years ago this month — when I heard that President John F. Kennedy had been shot.

Read more
The Protojournalist
1:04 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Peak Halloween: Is The Holiday Over The Hill?

Barbara Helgason iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 3:13 pm

Is Halloween — our national October obsession with candy, costumes and decorations — over and done?

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Haiku In The News: Reality In Riyadh

A Saudi woman walks past vehicles stopping at a traffic light in Riyadh, where there is a government ban on women driving.
Fayez Nureldine AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:15 pm

Poetry is important. And the hope for this standing feature of The Protojournalist is that by searching for a poetic nugget in the constant rush of news we can slow down for a moment and contemplate what the news story really means.

Like finding a lovely pebble in a mountain stream. Or a dropped earring on a crowded sidewalk.

Haiku in the News — you can find other examples here — is not designed to be a trivial thing.

Gray Lady Poems

Read more
The Protojournalist
11:17 am
Sat October 12, 2013

The True Meaning Of The National Mall

A demonstrator glides past the Washington Monument, as prelude to the World Naked Bike Ride on June 9, 2007.
SAUL LOEB AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 9:10 am

On the National Mall: Though monuments and museums along the greenway are closed due to the federal shutdown, veterans are planning to march on Sunday and activists gathered last week to draw attention to immigration reform. On Oct.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:28 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Things Are Getting Ugly

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 9:41 am

Ugly is everywhere. There are Ugly Dog pageants, Ugly Sweater sites and Ugly Sofa contests. Taking Ugly-Faced selfies is an online phenomenon. Could ugly be the new beautiful?

Read more
The Protojournalist
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

The 1,000-Year Calendar: Mark These Dates

In the futuristic books, movies, songs and video games that abound, there is an overabundance of speculation about the distant future.

Read more
The Protojournalist
11:15 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Why Are Most Rampage Shooters Men?

A makeshift memorial hangs on a lamp post across the street from the Washington Navy Yard, on Sept. 20.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 12:29 pm

Aaron Alexis, the man who police say killed more than a dozen people at the Washington Navy Yard on Sept. 16, has joined a heinous parade of mass murdering shooters, nearly all men.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:57 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Are There Too Many 'Hillionaires' In Washington?

House Oversight Committee chairman and megamillionaire Darrell Issa is reportedly worth more than $355 million.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 10:08 am

Capitol Hill is rife with rich people — "hillionaires," if you will.

Writing in The New York Times, Nicholas Carnes, a public policy professor at Duke University, points out that millionaires show up in only 3 percent of American families. But more than 60 percent of the Senate, most members of the House of Representatives and the Supreme Court — and the president himself — are millionaires.

Read more
The Protojournalist
1:24 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Haiku In The News: The New $100 Bill

Mark Wilson Getty Images

"It's certainly one

of the most valuable

bills to counterfeit."

Currency expert Ben Mazzotta of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, speaking to CBSMiami/CNN about the U.S. Treasury Department's efforts to create a newly designed $100 note that is more difficult to replicate.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sat August 31, 2013

The Rise And Fall Of Slackers

iStock

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 10:15 am

As we pause this Labor Day weekend to celebrate the Great American Worker, we can't help but wonder: Whatever happened to the Great American Slacker?

It wasn't that long ago that slackers ruled the earth. OK, maybe ruled is a bit over the top because slackers, by definition, didn't really rule — or try very hard or take full responsibility. Whatever. But they sure were omnipresent there for a while.

Read more
The Protojournalist
12:41 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

What Is Going No? Negativity In America

NPR Photoillustration

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 12:47 pm

No, no, no.

A wave of negativism rolls across the land. Many Americans are against instead of for. They would rather stop than start, subtract than add, demolish than build.

Read more
The Protojournalist
12:00 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

5 Odd Things You Can Buy

Roadside trash.
eBay

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:14 am

For the person who has everything — or maybe wants everything — we go Windows-shopping at Why I'm Broke, a portal to outrageous gift ideas.

Read more
The Protojournalist
10:29 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Baseball Danger: An Instant Conversation

Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals gestures toward the pitcher after being hit by a pitch in a game against the Atlanta Braves at Nationals Park on Aug. 6 in Washington, D.C.
Greg Fiume Getty Images

Starter: You know, with all the talk in recent years of "bounty hits" — tackles designed to knock opposing players out of professional football games — among players in the NFL, it may be easy to forget that professional baseball players have a similar system that, in a way, could be even more dangerous: It's called retaliation.

Read more
The Protojournalist
12:21 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

The End Of Football As We Know It

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 9:31 am

The Kickoff

It happens every year — air cools, leaves change, Americans talk about the demise of football. This year there may be more talk than usual, for several reasons, such as:

1st Down

Read more
The Protojournalist
12:52 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

The Secret Meanings Of Tattoos

beana_cheese Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:26 pm

Concerned that some professional football players may be sporting gang-related tattoos, the NFL is calling in people who are experts in reading the meanings of body ink, CBS Sports reports.

Tattoos may be skin deep, but their significance sometimes goes deeper. The messages sent by body art are an individual's self-expression, but there are recurring motifs that can often tell you something about the wearer.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Elevator Pitch: Why Care About Washington?

wbeem via Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 9:24 am

­­My friend Mark Leibovich — a New York Times reporter — has written a book about the inner watchworkings of Power Washington called This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral-Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!-in America's Gilded Capital. Among the incestuous cognoscenti of the Capital City, This Town has more buzz than a top-bar beehive.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

The Life Of Paula Deen: In A Four-Course Menu

Cooking show host Paula Deen visits FOX Studios in December.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:19 pm

Appetizer: Hogs In A Sleeping Bag

These hearty kielbasas, partially hidden in puff pastries, represent Paula Deen's first catering company The Bag Lady — begun in 1989. It offered "lunch and love" ... in a bag.

Read more
The Protojournalist
11:24 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Haiku In The News: Obama In Berlin

Sean Gallup Getty Images

"Citizens who choose ...

To be defined by a wall,

or ... to tear it down. "

From Remarks by President Obama at the Brandenburg Gate. June 19, 2013.

****

(If you find examples of Haiku in the News, please send them to: protojournalist@npr.org)

The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sun June 16, 2013

World's Shortest Business Brief: The Smoffice

The World's Smallest Office competition is over. But will the Smoffice create jobs?

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sat June 15, 2013

The Love Song Of Ollie Cantos

Linton Weeks NPR

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 8:08 am

Ollie Cantos – blind his whole life – has a law degree and has worked in the White House. He's overcome self-doubts, prejudices, naysayers and countless unforeseen – and unseen – obstacles to get to this point. Not content, he's hoping to adopt teenage triplets — Leo, Nick and Steven — also blind. "My whole life has changed. I live for these guys," says Ollie, 42, who lives in Arlington, Va., and works for the federal government.

Read more
The Protojournalist
10:06 am
Fri June 14, 2013

The Protojournalist: An NPR Project

Library of Congress

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 12:19 pm

Seeing journalism changing. Storytelling, too.

Looking for new ways to tell stories. Like looking for alternative energies.

Stories are found everywhere – in a game, in graffiti, in a list, in a painting, in a sunset. In a face. In a life. On a screen. New tools create new ways to tell stories.

We can break news and break barriers at the same time.

Read more
The Protojournalist
9:59 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Dear NSA: Please Read This Email

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 12:19 pm

To: The National Security Agency

From: The Protojournalist

Subject: Please feel free to read our email exchange with Wendy Nather, a high-tech analyst who focuses on security issues at 451 Research in Austin, Texas. Not that you need our permission.

Dear Wendy Nather,

Read more
Politics
11:31 am
Wed April 24, 2013

How About You Be The Decider

A portion of an exhibit is shown in the museum area at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas on April 16. The George W. Bush Presidential Center, which includes the library, museum and policy institute, will be dedicated Thursday at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.
Benny Snyder AP

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 3:37 pm

You think you're so smart. You think it's easy being the president of the United States. OK, pal — here's your chance.

One of the attractions of the new George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas — scheduled to be dedicated on Thursday — is Decision Points Theater, an interactive experience. The venue allows visitors to participate in a simplified simulation of the presidential decision-making process.

Read more
U.S.
10:56 am
Wed April 17, 2013

What Boston Means To America

Faneuil Hall, in downtown Boston, was built in the 1740s.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:20 pm

As a city, Boston is at the crux of this country's past, present and future.

This was brought home on April 15 — Tax Day, Patriots Day, Marathon Day — when two deadly bombs exploded on historic Boylston Street near the finish line of the 117th running of the Boston Marathon.

The tragic blasts occurred so close to the Boston Public Library that the building — home to the personal book collection of Founding Father John Adams — is included in the crime scene.

The bombs struck at the very heart of the heart of America.

Read more

Pages