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All Tech Considered
4:35 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Net Neutrality, Shall I Compare Thee To A Highway? A Showerhead?

Members of global advocacy group Avaaz stand next to a digital counter showing the number of petition signatures calling for net neutrality outside the Federal Communication Commission in Washington in January. Avaaz joined other groups to deliver more than a million signatures for a free and open Internet to the FCC.
Kevin Wolf AP

The Federal Communications Commission says it's writing rules for the Internet to preserve the status quo.

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Code Switch
3:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

The Youth Unemployment Crisis Hits African-Americans Hardest

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:50 am

Young people are being chased out of the labor market. Though the national unemployment rate has fallen steadily in recent months, youth unemployment remains stubbornly high, and the jobless rate is even higher among young minorities. For young people between the ages of 16 and 24, unemployment is more than twice the national rate, at 14.2 percent. For African-Americans, that rate jumps to 21.4 percent.

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Around the Nation
5:00 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Despite California's Drought, Taps Still Flowing In LA County

A sign over a highway in Glendale, Calif., warned motorists in February to save water in response to the state's severe drought. But a study released earlier this week showed residents in the southern coastal part of the state used more water this spring than they did last year.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 9:52 am

This January, after the driest calendar year in California history, Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency. He called on residents to reduce their water intake by 20 percent.

But downtown Los Angeles doesn't look like a city devastated by the state's worst drought in decades. The city is green with landscaping, and fountains are running. People still water their lawns, wash their cars and fill their pools.

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My Big Break
3:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Fitness Trainer Shaun T: 'I Understand Why You Feel Weak'

Shaun Blokker, known as Shaun T, is the man behind the fitness programs Hip Hop Abs and Insanity.
Derek Baron

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 12:43 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

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Science
3:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Sixth-Grader's Science Project Catches Ecologists' Attention

Scientists previously underestimated the ability of the lionfish to live in less salty water.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 1:40 pm

(July 24, 2014: See the editor's note at the bottom of this page for an explanation of the story's new headline.)

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

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Movie Interviews
8:14 am
Sun July 20, 2014

The Secret Behind Romero's Scary Zombies: 'I Made Them The Neighbors'

George A. Romero says zombies are just the disaster in his films. "My stories are more about the humans," he explains. Romero's latest project is a comic book called Empire of the Dead.
Vittorio Zunino Celotto Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 20, 2014 1:59 pm

Director George A. Romero grew up on classic movie monsters — and he says he never dreamed he'd be responsible for creating the modern zombie that now lurks alongside those monsters. "I never expected it. I really didn't," he tells NPR's Arun Rath. "... All I did was I took them out of 'exotica' and I made them the neighbors ... I thought there's nothing scarier than the neighbors!"

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Author Interviews
3:05 pm
Sat July 19, 2014

To Meet A 'Mockingbird': Memoir Recalls Talks With Harper Lee

Harper Lee, pictured in 2007 before receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 6:34 am

In 1960, Harper Lee published To Kill a Mockingbird, won the Pulitzer Prize, and overnight became one of America's most beloved writers. But Lee was overwhelmed by the media blitz that followed. She retreated from the public eye, became wary of journalists, and never published another book.

Then, in 2001, a reporter for The Chicago Tribune showed up in Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Ala., to work on a story about the town, which is the model for the fictional setting of Lee's novel.

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Sat July 19, 2014

Learning To Love The Ocean After A Lifetime Of Fearing It

Every Wednesday for a decade, Tim Bomba has been helping people in Santa Monica, Calif., get over their fears of the ocean.
Carlo Allegri Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 9:14 am

Tim Bomba is a tall, rangy guy with a quick smile. He's a marathoner, a triathlete (he's done two Ironman races), and every Wednesday morning for the last decade, Bomba has taught a ocean swimming course in Santa Monica, Calif.

The course, called Ocean 101, isn't for accomplished swimmers like Bomba. It's for people who are new to the ocean, and many participants are afraid of the water when they arrive. Bomba knows what they're going through. He himself was terrified of swimming until he was in his 50s.

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Movie Interviews
2:19 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

In New Film, Zach Braff Asks: How Long Can You Pursue Your Dreams?

In Wish I Was Here, Braff plays a father who embarks on a chaotic attempt to home-school his kids, Tucker (Pierce Gagnon ) and Grace (Joey King).
Merie Weismiller Wallace, SMPSP Focus Features

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 5:54 pm

Zach Braff is currently performing on Broadway, and for a time he starred in the TV comedy Scrubs. But he's also known for directing and starring in the 2004 film Garden State, a model of 20-something angst.

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The Salt
3:43 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

QUIZ: Which Of These State Fair Foods Are Faux?

Deep-fried breakfast on-a-stick is a new food at this year's Minnesota State Fair. It contains American and Swiss cheeses, a sausage patty, one egg and Canadian bacon sandwiched between two pancakes, then dipped in a light, sweet batter and deep-fried on a stick.
Courtesy of Minnesota State Fair

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 5:54 pm

It is the season of state fairs, when you may have a chance to expand your palate or test your gag reflex at the concession stands. (Once you're stuffed, maybe you'll get to admire a butter sculpture.)

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Parallels
1:32 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Amid A 'Shimmering' Tension, A Walk Through Israel And The West Bank

Paul Salopek, National Geographic fellow, looks out over Jerusalem during his seven-year journey by foot from Africa to South America.
Bassam Almohor National Geographic

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 9:09 am

Not long ago, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek traveled through Israel and the West Bank as part of his journey walking from Africa to South America. He was there this spring, before the current violence erupted. Talking recently from Cyprus to Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep, he says the long-standing conflict was part of daily life.


Interview Highlights

On coming under fire from Israeli soldiers

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The Salt
6:48 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Calorie Counting Machine May Make Dieting Easier In The Future

A model of General Electric's automatic calorie counter, fitted over a plate of food.
Courtesy of GE

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 10:51 am

Part of losing weight boils down to making tweaks to the simple equation of calories in versus calories out.

Americans spend over $60 billion a year on diet and weight loss products, according to market research, but the weight often comes right back. That may be because it's such a hassle to count calories — tracking everything you order or cook at home.

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Men In America
2:15 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

The 3 Scariest Words A Boy Can Hear

Joe Ehrmann, shown in 1975, was a defensive lineman with the Baltimore Colts for much of the '70s. He says that as a child, he was taught that being a man meant dominating people and circumstances — a lesson that served him well on the football field, but less so in real life.
Neil Leifer Sports Illustrated/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 4:24 pm

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

It's rare that a man makes it through life without being told, at least once, "Be a man." To Joe Ehrmann, a former NFL defensive lineman and now a pastor, those are the three scariest words that a boy can hear.

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Movies
3:32 pm
Sun July 13, 2014

Kids' Films And Stories Share A Dark Theme: Dead Mothers

Sarah Boxer is the author of Ultimate Blogs and the graphic novel In The Floyd Archives.
Courtesy of Sarah Boxer

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 3:37 pm

The death of Bambi's mother has moved — and horrified — generations of children. The fleeing, the gunshot, the desperate search and then the gut-wrenching words: "Your mother can't be with you anymore."

For many, that scene was traumatizing; for some it was the very first experience of loss. But Bambi is far from the only animated film featuring a mother's tragic death.

Just ask Sarah Boxer.

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Author Interviews
3:32 pm
Sun July 13, 2014

William T. Vollmann Explores The Afterlife In 'Last Stories'

Originally published on Sun July 13, 2014 5:10 pm

William T. Vollmann has been called a "unique and essential voice in American letters." He's the author of novels, story collections, a memoir and massive works of nonfiction.

His latest book, Last Stories and Other Stories, is his first work of fiction in nine years. And he says at the book's beginning that it will be his final work — as a living human, at least. "Any subsequent productions bearing my name will have been written by a ghost," he writes.

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Code Switch
3:32 pm
Sun July 13, 2014

Princess Of 'Fresh Prince' Brings History To Children

A record of Garrett Morgan's traffic light patent submission at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
Garrett Morgan U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 1:51 pm

Hey, remember Hilary Banks from Fresh Prince of Bel-Air?

She's back, but in a different light. Actress Karyn Parsons has started a new organization — Sweet Blackberry — that makes short, animated films about influential, yet lesser-known African-Americans.

She still loves acting, she told Kelly McEvers of Weekend All Things Considered, but her priorities have changed since she became a mom.

Parson says being pregnant with her daughter got her thinking about her responsibility, as a parent, to add to her kids' formal education.

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Author Interviews
2:54 pm
Sat July 12, 2014

'Fightshark' Recounts His Struggles, In Kickboxing And Beyond

HarperCollins

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 4:30 pm

In the kickboxing ring, Mark Miller goes by "Fightshark" — a name he chose, he says, because when he smells blood, he attacks.

The legendary super heavyweight kickboxer first made his name in fighting in the early 2000s.

"In the early part of the decade, I was 6'4, 230 [pounds], and I was small for heavyweight kickboxing," he tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "It's a lot of speed and power involved."

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Arts & Life
2:54 pm
Sat July 12, 2014

Wounded Bull-Runner: 'If You Run Long Enough, You Get Gored'

U.S. runner Bill Hillmann is gored on his right leg during the running of the bulls of the San Fermin festival, in Pamplona, Spain, on Wednesday.
Daniel Ochoa de Olza AP

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 4:30 pm

When Bill Hillmann joined this year's running of the bulls in Pamplona, Spain, he knew exactly what he was signing up for. After all, he co-wrote the book on it.

Hillmann was a contributor to Fiesta: How to Survive the Bulls of Pamplona. But his expertise didn't protect him from harm this year: A lone bull, or suelto, gored him through the right leg.

From his hospital bed, Hillmann tells NPR's Kelly McEvers that he feels fine. "They've got me on some really good painkillers, so I'm just kind of floating here," he says.

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Shots - Health News
8:18 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Searching For Stress Relief? Try Feeling Your Breath

Stressed? Try taking a fresh look at what's actually going on.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:12 am

Many Americans are swamped with stress, but there may be ways to ease the tension without changing the circumstances.

Almost half of all adults say they've experienced a major stressful event in the past year, according to a poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Meditation can help people cope, says author Sharon Salzberg, co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Mass.

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Author Interviews
3:35 am
Sat July 12, 2014

A Marriage In Crisis Is The Model For This 'Drawing'

Robin Black is also the author of If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This.
Picasa Random House

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:12 am

Life Drawing is a novel that will make you want to hug the person you love and never let go.

It's a thriller and a love story. But it isn't about over-the-moon, happy, young love; it's about love when the marriage is no longer easy, when every move the couple makes is haunted by a betrayal.

Life Drawing is Robin Black's first novel. She tells NPR's Tamara Keith why she chose to explore a marriage in crisis and the challenge of writing about Alzheimer's when she had no experience with the disease.

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Goats and Soda
10:52 am
Fri July 11, 2014

It's 'Etsy,' Kenyan Style: Making Art Out Of Flip-Flops And Bottle Tops

Apollo Omondi Omware couldn't find a white-collar job, so he created his own business, weaving baskets and training others to weave as well.
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 12:37 pm

Sure, it's tough to earn a living as an artist. But it helps if your materials don't cost a lot. At the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, several of the Kenyan craftspeople work wonders with discarded beer bottles and flip-flops.

Jonathan Lento: He Fashions Flip-Flops Into Funky Fauna

Jonathan Lento grips a slender knife in one hand and a colorful block made of glued-together flip-flops in the other.

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The Salt
5:03 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

Intrepid pizza purveyors in action: Frontier Airlines flight attendants pass out pies to the delighted passengers.
Logan Marie Torres AP

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 9:12 am

It's one of those stories that start in the middle. Midflight from Washington, D.C., to Denver on Monday, pilot Gerhard Brandner hit some bad weather that forced him to land in Wyoming. It was a mundane delay like most others. His Frontier Airlines plane was grounded on a tarmac in Cheyenne.

That's when the pilot made a decision that made him a national hero.

"I figure out, well, I'm getting hungry; I'll bet you the folks be hungry back there, too," Brandner says. "So I called Domino's."

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Report Says FBI, NSA Spied On American Muslims

Rutgers professor Hooshang Amirahmadi, one of the American Muslims identified by the Intercept as a target of covert surveillance by the FBI and the NSA.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 4:45 pm

Reporters Glenn Greenwald and Murtaza Hussain say, in the online news website Intercept, that based on information provided by Edward Snowden they have evidence that the FBI and NSA used covert surveillance on the email accounts of 202 American Muslims.

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Shots - Health News
10:08 am
Wed July 9, 2014

What Gets You Stressed? Tell Our Expert Panel

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 8:42 am

Editor's note: The webcast is over, but you can watch the archived video of the event.

For many Americans, stress is a constant and frequently overwhelming fact of daily life.

What are the biggest sources of stress? How does stress affect us? And what do we do in response?

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Goats and Soda
10:32 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Meet The Musicians And Storytellers Of Kenya

Eric Wainaina
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:29 am

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Men In America
3:27 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Teen Tries To Be The Parent His Own Dad Never Was

Marvin Ramos, now 18, was overwhelmed when his daughter, Hailey, was born. But now he says he's determined to be the best father he can be. "I haven't run away," he says, "and I never want to."
Marvin Ramos Courtesy of WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:40 pm

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Marvin Ramos found out he was going to be a father when his girlfriend, Stephanie, called him during a basketball game. He says he sat down on a bench and looked up at the sky. He was 16. Stephanie was 19.

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All Tech Considered
2:29 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

We Asked, You Answered: Going To Extremes To Disconnect On Vacation

Our readers wrote in on how they tried to take a vacation from their smartphones.
Christian Wheatley iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 8:08 am

Summer is a great time to take a break from some of the stressors in our lives. For many of us, that stress is brought on by too much screen time and the pressure to stay connected.

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Around the Nation
4:56 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 9:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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Movie Interviews
3:18 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

The Life And Death Of 'The Internet's Own Boy'

Aaron Swartz was heavily involved in the popular 2012 campaign to prevent the passage of the federal Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA.
Quinn Norton Falco Ink Publicity

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:48 am

Aaron Swartz was a programmer, a hacker, a freedom of information activist — and a casualty of suicide.

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My Big Break
3:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

After Assault, Woman Finds Hope And Career In Restorative Justice

Lorenn Walker, now a lawyer, was assaulted in 1976 in an alley near this hotel in Waikiki, Hawaii.
Robyn Pfahl

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:28 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Lorenn Walker works to help both victims and offenders after crimes are committed. She's a restorative lawyer from the North Shore of Oahu in Hawaii, where she focuses on violence prevention and works on re-entry programs for prisoners.

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