KRWG

Sarah McCammon

Sarah McCammon worked for Iowa Public Radio as Morning Edition Host from January 2010 until December 2013.

Donald Trump may face a skeptical public as he prepares to take office, but his staunch supporters seem ready to back him regardless of what he does as president. And they have a message for those upset with his victory: get over it. "Everybody's protesting that Trump got in," said Deborah LaGrange, a dental assistant from Des Moines, Iowa, who attended a Trump thank-you tour rally Thursday. "I'm sorry, but I didn't whine and cry when Obama got in for the last eight. I mean, pull up your...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. SCOTT SIMON, HOST: People who've closely observed Donald Trump as a businessman describe him as a skilled salesman who loves to make a big pitch. That paid off for Trump in 2016, but it hasn't always in his business career. His ability to adjust and compromise could give some insight into how he may govern, as NPR's Sarah McCammon reports. SARAH MCCAMMON, BYLINE: Barbara Res worked for Trump for close to two decades, including on a...

President-elect Donald Trump has made it clear that Vice President-elect Mike Pence will have a major role in governing. He recently tapped Pence to take over leadership of his transition planning from New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and Pence spent the day Tuesday at Trump Tower as the two men select key members of their administration. It's hard to imagine two men with more different personalities and backgrounds. Trump — with his brand name and background in real estate — was an...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: President-elect Donald Trump has made it clear that his vice president-elect, Mike Pence, will have a major role in governing. Already, Trump has put Pence in charge of the presidential transition effort. Well, the pair met today at Trump Tower in New York. That's where Trump and his closest aides are preparing for their inauguration in just over two months. And NPR's Sarah McCammon reports the two men have many...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And we want to turn now to the Trump campaign. Donald Trump was not backing off of his attacks. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) DONALD TRUMP: You can't review 650,000 new emails in eight days. You can't do it, folks. Hillary Clinton is guilty. She knows it. The FBI knows it. The people know it. And now it's up to the American people to deliver justice at the ballot box on Nov. 8. MARTIN: NPR's Sarah McCammon is...

When Donald Trump decided to run for president — after flirting with politics for many years, and gaining a following on the right for questioning President Obama's birthplace — the real estate developer and businessman from Queens was dismissed and laughed at by political observers. Many largely wrote the whole thing off as a publicity stunt. But Trump's astonishing rise to the Republican nomination was marked by an aura of invincibility unlike any politician in memory. In the early days of...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: You know, not that long ago, Donald Trump was dismissing the polls that showed his campaign trailing behind Democrat Hillary Clinton. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) DONALD TRUMP: I don't believe the polls anymore. I don't believe them. GREENE: That is the Republican nominee last month at a rally in Colorado Springs. Well, a lot can change in a couple of weeks, including Trump's assessment of whether the polls...

White evangelicals are reliable Republican voters . They also have a long history of demanding that politicians exemplify character and morality in public life. So for many, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump presents a moral dilemma. Trump has apologized for what many saw as one of his most egregious moments — bragging about groping and kissing women without consent in a 2005 recording . He has denied allegations from several women accusing him of sexual assault . But the episode...

Donald Trump laid out his closing pitch to voters on Saturday in Pennsylvania, a battleground state that is home to many actual battlegrounds. "It's my privilege to be here in Gettysburg, hallowed ground where so many lives were given," Trump said. Trump reiterated the major themes of his campaign, like cracking down on illegal immigration. He also promised to sue women who've come forward to accuse him of unwanted sexual contact. But first, he drew a parallel to the state of the nation...

Brent Harger of Washoe County, Nev., says he has always voted, but until this year, he'd never really gotten involved in politics. "I've always been told my voice means nothing. I don't believe that," Harger says. "And there's a lot of people that are scared to even say anything today because they don't think their voice means anything." At 57, Harger can no longer work as a mechanic because of problems with his neck and back. He has been using some of his free time to volunteer for the...

Liberty University is a place where Donald Trump still has a lot of support. But his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, is the one who seems naturally at home at the Virginia college, in a way the flamboyant New York real estate developer is not. Pence spent Wednesday morning campaigning at the school. In his speech, he alluded to Scripture about sin and redemption as he talked about the scandal surrounding his running mate — the release of a tape where Trump can be heard explicitly...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Now let's turn to Pennsylvania where Donald Trump is campaigning today. NPR's Sarah McCammon is on the line with us from Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Looking at events over the last few days, it seems like Trump's campaign is in crisis mode. Did it seem like that when he spoke today near Pittsburgh? SARAH MCCAMMON, BYLINE: You know, not really. I mean he was back to his old routine - going after Bill and Hillary Clinton,...

Donald Trump has apologized for his vulgar comments about women that were revealed in a recording obtained by the Washington Post on Friday. But is he truly sorry for his attempt to seduce a married woman and for boasting about groping women he'd just met? That may be the question for some Republicans who haven't yet joined the growing chorus of calls for Trump to withdraw his candidacy as he heads into Sunday night's second presidential debate of the general election cycle. For Republicans...

Donald Trump's campaign is responding to a New York Times report that the real estate mogul claimed hundreds of millions of dollars in losses on tax returns in 1995 — an amount that could have allowed him to legally avoid paying income taxes for many years. The 1995 tax records obtained by the newspaper show Trump as having reported a $916 million loss on personal income tax returns during that year. Times reporter Susanne Craig, who's written about the Republican candidate's business...

If Donald Trump dredges up former President Bill Clinton's history of extramarital affairs to use it against his Democratic rival, it could be a risky move the GOP nominee amid the new storm he stoked over his own comments about and treatment of women. In his first debate on Monday against Hillary Clinton, Trump boasted that he had valiantly stayed away from the topic despite an inner dialogue with himself about whether to bring up the Clintons' marital woes. Before the debate, he had floated...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR .

Presidential candidates deliver hundreds of stump speeches over the course of their campaigns. This week, we're looking closely to the messages that the two major-party candidates deliver in city after city. In his stump speech, Donald Trump brings the energy and spends a lot of time talking about core issues like illegal immigration and trade as well as attacking the media and hitting Hillary Clinton, especially over her emails. And there's plenty of ad-libbing, especially about what's in...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR .

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories. From Miles Parks, associate producer for Here & Now : If you've been a Los Angeles Lakers fan for the past three seasons, I should begin by saying sorry. Anyone who's loved sports for an extended period of time has seen some rough...

Donald Trump's presidential campaign is going into five more states with a new $10 million television ad buy. It's the largest for the Trump campaign so far, which has been relatively slow to invest in TV ads, relying instead on free media coverage and the Republican nominee's large social media following. The campaign is now targeting the battleground states of New Hampshire, Iowa, Nevada, Virginia, and Colorado, putting Trump on the air in a total of nine states. The campaign rolled out its...

Immigration has been a galvanizing issue in Donald Trump's campaign from the beginning . But in recent days, the Republican nominee has been adjusting his position — first suggesting he'd be willing to " soften " calls to deport people in the country illegally, then returning to a more hard-line stance after criticism from prominent conservatives . But many of Trump's staunchest supporters seem unconcerned about his apparent policy shifts. Over the weekend, Trump supporters streamed in and...

Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET Like a lot of people's grandmothers, Flonzie Brown-Wright keeps a candy jar in the living room of her single-story home, which is also adorned with potted plants and family photos. For Brown-Wright, 74, this jar is a reminder of the absurd questions — questions with no real answers — that she and other African-Americans had to answer before registering to vote in Mississippi in the 1960s. "'How many jelly beans in a pound of candy? ... 'How many feathers are on a...

As Hillary Clinton began a meeting with police chiefs from departments around the country, she expressed gratitude to those on the force. "They represent officers who get up every day, put on their uniforms, kiss their families goodbye and risk their lives on behalf of our communities," the Democratic nominee said at the Thursday gathering in New York City. During the brief part of the meeting that was open to reporters, Clinton referenced Dallas, where five police officers were shot and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump has described himself as "really rich" — but by just about any standard, that label fits both the Republican presidential nominee and his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton. In an election year characterized by populist energy over economic concerns like jobs and trade, the gap is striking. Clinton's newly released tax returns show that she and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, made more than $10 million in 2015. Trump is under pressure to follow suit, but he has yet to...

Donald Trump's suggestion that "maybe there is" something Second Amendment supporters could do to stop his Democratic rival from picking Supreme Court justices caused outrage among those who read it as an incitement to violence. Trump says he was merely talking about the political power of gun-rights advocates and the National Rifle Association to defeat Hillary Clinton. But it's far from the first time the Republican nominee has made a statement that seems open to sinister interpretations....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hf2STe6Cb-g http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CLYV-dKC2E Updated at 9 p.m. ET Donald Trump has been saying for months that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton wants to "abolish the Second Amendment," but now the Republican presidential nominee has gone even further. At a rally in Wilmington, N.C., on Tuesday afternoon, Trump repeated that charge and then appeared to many observers to suggest taking up arms against his rival. "Hillary wants to abolish — essentially...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Philadelphia. They are picking up all of those balloons at the Wells Fargo Center a few miles from where we are here near the Liberty Bell. My colleague, Don Gonyea, is in the studio with me. And, Don, I guess it's, from here on, it's game-on time for this election. DON GONYEA, BYLINE: Absolutely. And last week, Republicans got a small bump, a medium-sized bump in the polls from their...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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