Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
8:41 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Nurse In Maine Breaches Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, are followed by a Maine State Trooper as they ride bikes on a trail near her home in Fort Kent, Maine, on Thursday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 9:39 am

Updated at 11:10 a.m. ET

For nurse Kaci Hickox, a morning bicycle ride has become an act of defiance.

As she and her boyfriend, Theodore Wilbur, peddled down a rural road in Maine's Fort Kent, state attorneys went to Superior Court to seek a judge's order to compel her to take a blood test that could indicate whether she carries the virus, Gov. Paul LePage told ABC News.

"This could be resolved today," the governor said. "She has been exposed and she's not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It's so simple."

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Apple CEO Tim Cook Comes Out As Gay

Apple CEO Tim Cook waves to a crowd before he is honored by the Alabama Academy of Honor at the Alabama state Capitol on Monday.
Brynn Anderson AP

Tim Cook, the head of the world's most iconic technology company, has come out today in an op-ed on Bloomberg Businessweek, saying he's never denied his sexual orientation but "I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now.

"Being gay has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day," Cook writes.

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The Two-Way
5:41 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Angry Mob Sets Fire To Parliament In Burkina Faso

Demonstrators set fire to cars near Burkina Faso's Parliament on Thursday in Ouagadougou.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of protesters in Burkina Faso broke through police lines and surged into the country's parliament, setting the building on fire ahead of a vote that would have allowed the country's president to extend his 27-year rule of the West African country.

The BBC reports that the ruling party headquarters and the city hall in the capital, Ouagadougou, were also in flames. State television reportedly went off the air.

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The Two-Way
5:09 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Tunisia's Secularists Victorious In Parliamentary Vote

Supporters of the secular Nidda Tounes (Tunisia Calls) party celebrate their victory in parliamentary elections before the elections were official earlier this week in Tunis.
Hassene Dridi AP

Tunisia's main secularist party has won a decisive victory against Islamists in parliamentary elections, grabbing 85 seats, or just under 40 percent in the 217-seat assembly, according to official results.

The Nidda Tounes (Tunisia Calls) party bested the ruling Islamist Ennahda party, which secured just 69 seats. Ennahda swept to power in the first such elections after the 2011 'Arab Spring' uprising in the North African country.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Russian Engines Could Be Focus Of Antares Launch Failure Probe

The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket suffers a catastrophic anomaly moments after launch at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on Tuesday.
Joel Kowsky AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 7:34 am

NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports that as investigators examine what went wrong with the launch of an unmanned Antares rocket on Tuesday, they'll likely take a hard look at powerful engines originally destined to send cosmonauts to the moon, a project that was scrapped by the USSR more than four decades ago.

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Maine To Enforce Quarantine For Nurse Who Worked In West Africa

A photo taken Sunday of Kaci Hickox in an isolation tent at University Hospital in Newark, N.J. Hickox, who was later discharged and allowed to return to her home in Maine, says she has no intention of abiding by a "voluntary" quarantine there.
Steven Hyman AP

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 11:08 am

Maine's Gov. Paul LePage says he will seek to legally force a nurse to undergo a 21-day quarantine after her return from West Africa, where she volunteered to treat Ebola patients.

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The Two-Way
7:56 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Russia Reportedly Suspected In Hack Of White House Network

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 10:43 am

The White House says it has taken steps to address "suspicious activity" detected on the unclassified Executive Office of the President computer network in recent weeks — a breach that The Washington Post says may be the work of hackers hired by the Kremlin.

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The Two-Way
7:26 am
Wed October 29, 2014

North Korean Officials Reportedly Executed For Watching Soap Operas

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 9:34 am

At least 10 North Korean officials have reportedly been put to death recently for the crime of watching South Korean soap operas.

The latest public executions reportedly bring to at least 50 the number of people put to death by the hard-line regime for taking in the unauthorized day-time dramas from south of the DMZ, The Independent reports, quoting South Korean sources familiar with a National Intelligence Service (NIS) briefing.

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The Two-Way
5:56 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Kurdish Fighters Begin Using Turkish Crossing To Reach Kobani

An explosion following an airstrike is seen in the Syrian town of Kobani from near the Mursitpinar border crossing in the southeastern town of Suruc, in Turkey's Sanliurfa province, on Wednesday.
Yannis Behrakis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 9:00 am

For the first time, a small group of Syrian rebels have been permitted to transit Turkish territory en route to the fight against militants of the self-declared Islamic State in the besieged border city of Kobani.

The Associated Press reports, citing Syrian activists and Kurdish officials, that the group of around 50 armed men are from the Free Syrian Army. It was reported earlier that Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga fighters were also being allowed to cross from Turkey.

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The Two-Way
4:52 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Zambian President Dies While Being Treated Abroad

Zambia's then-opposition leader Michael Sata speaks to journalists during a news conference in Lusaka in 2006. Sata, who became president in 2011, died while being treated for an undisclosed illness in London.
Siphiwe Sibeko Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 5:31 am

Zambia's President Michael Sata has died in London while being treated for an undisclosed illness, the government says.

"As you are aware, the president was receiving medical attention in London," Ronald Msiska told state television on Wednesday.

"The head of state passed on Oct. 28. President Sata's demise is deeply regretted. The nation will be kept informed on burial arrangements," he said. "I urge all of you to remain calm, united and peaceful during this very difficult period."

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Pope Says God Not 'A Magician, With A Magic Wand'

Pope Francis inaugurates a bronze statue of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI with Chancellor of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences Bishop Marcelo Sanchez Sorondo.
Claudio Peri EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 10:45 am

In a move that could be aimed at healing a rift between science and religion, Pope Francis has said that evolution and the Big Bang are consistent with the notion of a creator. And according to the pontiff, believers should not view God as "a magician, with a magic wand."

Francis made the remarks at an assembly of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, billed as meeting to discuss "Evolving Concepts of Nature."

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Friend Of Accused Boston Bomber Found Guilty Of Lying To Police

Robel Phillipos (left), a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, departs federal court on Monday. Phillipos was found guilty Tuesday of two counts of lying to the FBI.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 10:20 am

Robel Phillipos, a friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, has been found guilty of lying to FBI agents investigating the attack.

Prosecutors said Phillipos lied about having visited Tsarnaev's dorm room days after the April 15, 2013, attack that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others.

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The Two-Way
6:49 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Nurse Amber Vinson Discharged After Testing 'Ebola-Free'

Amber Vinson, a Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, will be discharged Tuesday.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 12:05 pm

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Amber Vinson, one of two nurses who contracted Ebola while treating a Liberian man earlier this month, is being discharged from Emory University in Atlanta after she tested free of the virus.

"I am so grateful to be well," Vinson said at an afternoon news conference where her discharge was announced.

"First and foremost, I want to thank God," she said, also acknowledging the role of her medical team in her recovery. "It's been God's love that has ... given me the strength to fight."

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The Two-Way
6:01 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Planned Vote In Ukraine's Separatist East Gets Moscow's Blessing

A Ukrainian government forces member, who takes part in a military operation eastern regions of Ukraine, reads candidate information sheets during a parliamentary election at a polling station in Novoaidar near Luhansk, on Sunday.
Reuters/Landov

Russia is backing a plan by separatists in eastern Ukraine to hold a vote in areas under their control ostensibly as part of a deal with Kiev to allow limited self-rule in the region. The vote, set for Nov. 2 would come days after Ukrainian elections that saw pro-Western parties allied with President Petro Poroshenko sweep to power.

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The Two-Way
5:18 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Hawaii Lava Flow Less Than 100 Yards From Homes In Pahoa Village

A geologist maps the margin of the lava flow in the open field below Cemetery Road near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii. Dozens of residents from the village may be forced to evacuate.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 7:10 am

Dozens of residents from the village of Pahoa on Hawaii's Big Island are preparing to watch their homes be engulfed by a slow-moving finger of lava that has traced a scorched path for months from its origin at Kilauea volcano.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira has said residents will be allowed to watch Mother Nature consume their homes to "provide for a means of closure.

"You can only imagine the frustration as well as ... despair they're going through," he said, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Mon October 27, 2014

U.N. Ambassador Goes To Sierra Leone For Closer Look At Ebola Crisis

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power has her temperature taken as she arrives in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Monday. Power is on a visit to West Africa to get a first-hand look at the global response to the epidemic.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 10:23 am

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

The U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations has arrived in Sierra Leone on her multi-nation swing through Ebola-stricken West Africa

Samantha Power, who arrived in the capital Freetown after visiting neighboring Guinea, has said Washington wants to help the region fight the deadly virus.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Death Penalty Reportedly Sought For Captain In Korean Ferry Disaster

The captain of the sunken ferry Sewol, Lee Joon-Seok (left) arrives on the second day of his trial at the Gwangju District Court in Gwanju, southwestern South Korea, in June.
Kim Hee-chul EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 1:21 pm

Prosecutors in South Korea are reportedly demanding the death penalty for the captain of a ferry that capsized and sank in April, killing more than 300 people. Lee Joon-seok is accused of homicide for leaving passengers, including many teenagers on a school outing, to fend for themselves.

Prosecutors say Lee failed to perform his duty as captain of the Sewol, according to Yonhap news agency.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Mon October 27, 2014

'Welcome Back, Kotter' Actress Marcia Strassman Dies At 66

This photo provided by Julie Strassman shows her sister, actress Marcia Strassman. The actress, who played Gabe Kaplan's wife, Julie, on the 1970's sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter, has died at age 66.
Randi St. Nicholas AP

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 12:54 pm

Actress Marcia Strassman, best known for her role in the 1970s TV sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter, has died at age 66, her sister says.

She died Friday at her home in the Sherman Oaks neighborhood of Los Angeles after a years-long struggle with breast cancer.

The Hollywood Reporter says:

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Town In Hawaii Prepares For Possible Evacuation Ahead Of Lava Flow

A lava flow advances across the pasture between the Pahoa cemetery and Apaa Street, engulfing a barbed wire fence, near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii on Sunday.
U.S. Geological Survey AP

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 10:05 am

Updated at 12:05 p.m. ET

Creeping lava from Mount Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island is burning a path ever-closer to an area where residents have been warned that they might have to quickly leave their homes.

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The Two-Way
5:01 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Pro-Western Parties Sweep Ukraine's Parliamentary Elections

People cast their ballots at a polling station during Ukrainian parliamentary elections in Kiev on Sunday.
Ivan Vakolenko UPI/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 9:34 am

Elections in Ukraine are pointing to a new parliament that will be dominated by pro-Western parties, a result that President Petro Poroshenko is hailing as a "course toward Europe" but one that is likely to further anger Russia.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Kiev that exit polls show the bloc supporting Porsohenko is projected to win about 23 percent of the vote, followed closely by an allied party, the People's Front, with around 21 percent.

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The Two-Way
11:58 am
Fri October 24, 2014

'Freakish' Sunspot Wows Astronomers

Image of sunspot AR 2192
Alan Friedman/Randall Shivak Averted Imagination

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 8:07 am

As sunspots go, AR 2192 is, as astronomer Phil Plait has noted, "freakishly huge."

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Dallas Nurse Nina Pham, Now 'Ebola Free,' Discharged By NIH

President Barack Obama gives a hug to Dallas nurse Nina Pham in the Oval Office of the White House Friday.
Olivier Douliery-Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:06 pm

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

Dallas nurse Nina Pham, who became the first person to contract Ebola on U.S. soil, is now free of the virus and has been discharged from a special facility at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

Speaking at a news conference, Pham said in a statement that she felt "fortunate and blessed" and put her trust "in God and my medical team."

"I believe in the power of prayer because I know so many people around the world were praying for me," she said.

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Boko Haram Reportedly Abducts More Girls Despite Cease-Fire Deal

Earlier this month, people demonstrated in Nigeria's capital, Abuja, calling on the government to rescue girls taken from a secondary school in Chibok region in April. Now there are reports that militants of the extremist Boko Haram movement have kidnapped more girls.
Olamikan Gbemiga AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 10:50 am

As Nigeria awaits the release of more than 200 kidnapped schoolgirls under a cease-fire deal with their Boko Haram captors, reports have come in that 25 more women and girls were abducted shortly after a truce was announced last Saturday.

The government in Abuja has condemned the latest reported abductions from two villages in the country's northeast Adamawa state by suspected militants from the extremist group.

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The Two-Way
6:14 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Mali's First Ebola Case In Current Outbreak Is 2-Year-Old Girl

A volunteer receives the experimental Ebola vaccination "cAd3-EBO-Z" at the vaccines center in Bamako, Mali, earlier this month. Mali has become the sixth country in West Africa to report Ebola.
Alex Duval Smith EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 11:55 am

Mali has become the sixth country in West Africa to confirm a case of Ebola, after a 2-year-old girl who arrived from neighboring Guinea tested positive for the hemorrhagic virus.

WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib says of the young girl: "She traveled with her grandmother in Guinea and returned to Mali. We don't have all details of this trip."

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The Two-Way
4:47 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Man With Hatchet Shot Dead After Attacking NYPD Officers

In this frame grab taken from video provided by the New York Police Department, an unidentified man approaches New York City police officers with a hatchet Thursday. The man was fatally shot by police after he wounded two officers.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 1:26 pm

A hatchet-wielding man has been shot and killed by police after he attacked a group of patrol officers, wounding two on a busy street in Queens, New York.

One of the officers was struck in the head and another in the arm during the attack, which occurred about 2 p.m. ET on Thursday. A bystander, a 29-year-old woman, was hit in the back by a stray police bullet as the assailant was engaged by the officers.

The New York Times reports:

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The Two-Way
10:42 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Ottawa Attack Seen As Canada's Security Wake-Up Call

Ottawa police officers, with Parliament Hill in the background, guard the area around the National War Memorial in downtown Ottawa on Thursday.
Blair Gable Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:28 pm

Until Wednesday, the front door of Canada's main Parliament building, Centre Block, was often left unlocked. Taken as a metaphor for the nation as a whole, many think the attack in Ottawa will change that approach to security.

In the assault, a soldier was killed as he guarded the National War Memorial and a shootout left the gunman dead inside Canada's parliamentary complex.

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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Canada's Parliament Gives Sergeant-At-Arms Standing Ovation

Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers is applauded in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Thursday. Vickers was credited with shooting the suspect during an attack on the Parliament complex on Wednesday.
Chris Wattie Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:31 pm

Barely 24 hours after a gunman attacked Parliament Hill in Ottawa, killing a soldier, lawmakers gave a standing ovation to Kevin Vickers, the legislature's sergeant-at-arms, for reportedly firing the shots that took down the assailant.

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Family Says Nurse Amber Vinson Is Free Of Ebola

Amber Vinson in a photograph taken earlier this week at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Officials at Emory and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention couldn't detect Ebola in Amber Vinson as of Tuesday evening, her family said in a statement.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:10 pm

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET.

A Texas nurse who contracted Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan in a Dallas hospital is now free of the potentially deadly virus, her family says.

Amber Vinson, 29, remains in treatment at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, but her family said in a statement that since Tuesday evening, doctors had been unable to detect traces of the disease in her blood.

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The Two-Way
5:57 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Ottawa Gunman's Actions Were 'Linked To His Radicalization,' Authorities Say

A makeshift memorial sits on a downtown street a block away from Canada's National War Memorial in Ottawa to remember Canadian soldier Nathan Cirillo, who was shot and killed by an assailant Wednesday.
Warren Toda EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:08 pm

Updated at 4:54 p.m. ET

The mother of the man identified as having gunned down a soldier before storming into Canada's Parliament complex offered condolences to the family of the victim, saying she had not seen her son for five years before meeting him for lunch last week.

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Blackwater Guards Found Guilty In 2007 Shootings In Iraq

Former Blackwater Worldwide guard Nicholas Slatten leaves federal court in Washington in June. Slatten on Wednesday was found guilty of first-degree murder in the deaths of 14 Iraqi civilians in 2007.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 12:42 pm

Four private security guards working for the Blackwater Worldwide firm who were charged in the 2007 shootings of more than 30 Iraqis have been found guilty by a federal jury.

Nicholas Slatten was found guilty of first-degree murder, and three others — Paul Slough, Evan Liberty and Dustin Heard — were found guilty of multiple counts of voluntary manslaughter.

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