Regional
12:46 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Group Distributes 4,000 Free "Endangered Species" Condoms For Valentine's Day

For Valentine’s Day the Center for Biological Diversity is sending 4,000 free Endangered Species Condoms to some of the most romantic getaway cities in North America. From Bar Harbor, Maine, to Santa Fe, N.M., the condoms will be given away by volunteers to raise awareness about how runaway human population growth affects endangered species around the globe.

 

Design by Lori Lieber. Artwork by Roger Peet. © 2012. All rights reserved. Reproduction or redistribution of images must be accompanied by acknowledgement of the designer and artist.
Design by Lori Lieber. Artwork by Roger Peet. © 2012. All rights reserved. Reproduction or redistribution of images must be accompanied by acknowledgement of the designer and artist.

  “Valentine's Day is the perfect time to spread a message of love by speaking out about human population growth and endangered species protection,” said Taralynn Reynolds, population and sustainability organizer at the Center. “Endangered Species Condoms are a great way to start the conversation about how our actions have impacts on polar bears, panthers and other critically endangered species.”

The condoms — wrapped in colorful packages featuring six different endangered species — are being distributed by volunteers in cities recently ranked by USA TODAY as the most romantic getaway cities in the United States, including St. Paul, Minn.; Savannah, Ga.; Charleston, S.C.; New Orleans; Naples, Fla.; and Honolulu.

More than a half-million Endangered Species Condoms have been given away since 2009.

“The Center’s condoms are a great way to protect yourself and the planet this Valentine’s Day,” said Reynolds. “They’re also a fun way to get people talking about how our growing human population — which now tops 7 billion — isn’t leaving much room for other species.”

In addition to the condoms, the Center has created fun and flirty “Endangered Love” e-cards that people can share with their loved ones on Valentine’s Day with slogans like, “Harold, do you remember when we were wild?” and, “Love is forever, wolves should be too.”

The Center’s campaign promotes a range of solutions, including universal access to birth control and family planning, as well as education and empowerment of women and girls.

In 2013 the Center expanded its population program to encompass overconsumption and sustainability, since these issues are intricately tied to the impact of human population size on endangered species. The Center is the only environmental organization with a full-time campaign dedicated to addressing rampant human population growth and overconsumption and their link to the current extinction crisis.