All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:40 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Could Kaiser Permanente's Low-Cost Health Care Be Even Cheaper?

George Halvorson, chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente, speaks during a session at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in 2009.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

Kaiser Permanente rose out of Henry J. Kaiser's utopian, industrialist dream.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Why Isn't Kaiser Permanente Cheaper?

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 3:18 pm

Kaiser Permanente, the California-based managed care consortium, is touted as a model for saving money in the health care system. But they are not as inexpensive as they used to be.

NPR Story
2:40 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Romney Says Obama Has Failed On Immigration

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Mitt Romney was actually in Arizona today. He held fundraisers but no public events. NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us now to talk about him. Hi, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi, Audie.

CORNISH: So, how did the Romney campaign respond to today's Supreme Court decision on the Arizona immigration law?

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National Security
2:34 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

FBI Tracking 100 Suspected Extremists In Military

The FBI is investigating more than 100 suspected Muslim extremists who are part of the U.S. military community, officials tell NPR. U.S. authorities have increased scrutiny since the 2009 shooting attack at Fort Hood, Texas, that left 13 dead. Maj. Nidal Hasan, charged with the killings, is shown here in an April 2010 court hearing.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

The FBI has conducted more than 100 investigations into suspected Islamic extremists within the military, NPR has learned. About a dozen of those cases are considered serious.

Officials define that as a case requiring a formal investigation to gather information against suspects who appear to have demonstrated a strong intent to attack military targets. This is the first time the figures have been publicly disclosed.

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Music Reviews
2:10 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

A Posthumous Masterpiece Adds To E.S.T.'s Legacy

E.S.T. was Esbjorn Svensson, Dan Berglund and Magnus Ostrom.
Jim Rakete

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 8:51 am

When the pianist Esbjorn Svensson died in a scuba accident in 2008, many fans of his group, the Swedish trio known as E.S.T., wondered if there might be some unreleased experiments lurking in a studio vault. There were. Just out is a disc called 301, which was recorded in 2008 during sessions for the group's final album.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

Egypt Celebrates, But Tough Road Ahead For New President, Muslim Brotherhood

Fireworks illuminate Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, on Sunday to celebrate the victory of Mohammed Morsi in the country's presidential election.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 6:35 am

The winner of Egypt's first competitive presidential election is the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi. The official announcement was made Sunday to the cheers and jubilation of a massive crowd in Cairo's Tahrir Square.

Challenges remain, however, as the ruling military council has effectively stripped the incoming president of most of his powers. The popularly elected Parliament, dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood, was also dissolved.

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Music
1:43 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

The Co-Opting Of Tchaikovsky's '1812 Overture'

A Civil War cannon with American flags in Kennesaw, Ga.
iStock

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:08 pm

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky wrote his piece The Year 1812, Festival Overture in E flat major in commemoration of the Russian Army's successful defense of Moscow against Napoleon's advancing troops at the Battle of Borodino. Most Americans, however, know the piece as the bombastic tune that accompanies Fourth of July fireworks shows all over the country.

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Music Interviews
1:38 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

Smashing Pumpkins: Making Peace With The Immediate Past

The Smashing Pumpkins in 2012 (from left): Nicole Fiorentino, Billy Corgan, Mike Byrne and Jeff Schroeder.
Paul Elledge Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 6:45 pm

Next year will mark the 20th anniversary of Siamese Dream, the second album by The Smashing Pumpkins and the one, along with 1995's Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, that broke the band into the mainstream and spawned its most lasting hits.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
11:24 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Movie Anthony Mackie's 'Seen A Million Times'

Kelly McGillis, left, and Tom Cruise star in the 1986 film, "Top Gun." (AP Photo/Paramount Pictures)
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:11 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen a Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Presidential Race
3:52 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Putting A Positive Spin On Negative Campaigning

The 1988 presidential race between George H.W. Bush and Michael Dukakis is often considered one of the most negative elections in the modern era.
Lennox McLendon AP

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 4:46 am

The general presidential election is still months away, but President Obama and presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney are already hammering each other with attack ads.

Obama's most recent ads criticize Romney's time as a so-called "corporate raider," while Romney has released several ads seizing upon the president's statement that the "private sector is doing fine."

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Around the Nation
2:56 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

University, Community Reacts To Sandusky Conviction

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 3:42 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Jerry Sandusky will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. After just two days of deliberations, a jury found the former Penn State assistant coach guilty of sexually abusing 10 boys. He'll be sentenced in 90 days. But right now, the community where he lived and worked is trying to recover from the damage he caused.

NPR's Jeff Brady joins us from State College, Pennsylvania. And, Jeff, what are people saying about that verdict there today?

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Television
2:25 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Norman Lear: 'Just Another Version Of You'

Norman Lear (center) created, developed and produced the hit show All in the Family, which ran from 1971 to 1979. The politically charged sitcom starred Jean Stapleton, Carroll O'Connor, Rob Reiner, Sally Struthers and Mike Evans.
CBS /Landov

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 3:42 pm

When legendary TV producer Norman Lear was young, his father gave him a do-it-yourself radio kit. Lear built it, turned it on and remembers one day hearing a fiery broadcast that spoke kindly of the Nazi movement and ranted against Jews.

"It scared the hell out of me," Lear, who is Jewish, tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz. "It was the first time that I learned that I was, quote, 'different.' I started to pay a lot more attention to people who were even more different."

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Around the Nation
4:00 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

A Century-Old Grotto That Might Out-Glitter Vegas

Father Paul Dobberstein began building the Grotto of the Redemption in West Bend, Iowa, 100 years ago. It's covered with stones, rocks, petrified wood and seashells.
Denise Krebs via Flickr

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 4:11 pm

The Midwest is known for its roadside attractions — world's largest ear of corn, heaviest ball of twine, biggest truck stop.

But it's also home to one of the largest collections of grottoes in the world. Most of these man-made caves were created by immigrant priests at the beginning of the 20th century. And the mother of them all — encrusted in $6 million worth of semiprecious stones — is in West Bend, Iowa.

This weekend, the Grotto of the Redemption turns 100.

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Sports
3:47 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

40 Years On, Title IX Still Shapes Female Athletes

Michelle Marciniak (right) of the University of Tennessee Lady Volunteers attempts to elude the defensive pressure of Nykesha Sales of the UConn Huskies during the 1996 NCAA Women's Final Four.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 4:30 pm

Title IX, which turns 40 on Saturday, has helped reverse years of bias, banning sex discrimination in federally funded schools and colleges.

Its guarantee of equal access to sports was a small part of the original legislation. But it's become the most recognizable part of Title IX. That guarantee has not always played out, and the law has its critics. For four decades, however, it's played a huge part in shaping lives.

'I Can Handle This World'

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Movie Interviews
3:00 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

Digital Domain Grapples With Fur, Feathers

Gesundheit: Kichaa is the name of one of the animated characters causing consternation among the animators at Digital Domain. He's featured in the upcoming film The Legend of Tembo.
Digital Domain

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 3:42 pm

You may not have heard of the special-effects studio Digital Domain, but you've probably seen their work. They sank the Titanic for James Cameron; they aged Brad Pitt backward in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. Most recently, their virtual likeness of the late Tupac Shakur performed in concert.

Having worked those wonders, they're tackling thornier challenges: fur and feathers.

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Politics
2:57 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

Candidate Accidentally Uploads Four Reaction Videos

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 4:11 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Call it being prepared. Call it a blunder. Whatever you call it, a dirty little campaign secret is out. Politicians sometimes pre-tape supposedly instant responses.

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The Record
2:02 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

Richard Adler, Broadway Composer And Lyricist, Dies

Celebrated composer and lyricist Richard Adler has died at the age of 90.
Bob Gomel Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 4:11 pm

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Art & Design
1:54 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

A Trailblazing Black Architect Who Helped Shape L.A.

The Degnan residence was built as a weekend retreat in La Canada Flintridge — a Los Angeles suburb reachable by freeway in 40 minutes (in light traffic) today, but that took a couple of hours' drive in 1927, before major freeway construction began in Southern California. This Spanish Colonial Revival home was Williams' first commission as an independent practitioner.
Copyright Benny Chan

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 6:37 pm

Paul Revere Williams began designing homes and commercial buildings in the early 1920s. By the time he died in 1980, he had created some 2,500 buildings, most of them in and around Los Angeles, but also around the globe. And he did it as a pioneer: Paul Williams was African-American. He was the first black architect to become a member of the American Institute of Architects in 1923, and in 1957 he was inducted as the AIA's first black fellow.

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Music Interviews
1:02 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

Take A Trip To Downtown L.A. With La Santa Cecilia

Singer Marisol Hernandez (center) takes listeners from her grandfather's burro cart to La Santa Cecilia's Latin Grammy Award, on Olvera Street in Los Angeles.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 4:50 pm

Named for the patron saint of musicians, La Santa Cecilia has deep roots in the immigrant community of Los Angeles. Yet the band's six members draw inspiration not only from their rich heritage, but also from their everyday lives growing up embedded in American culture.

During a short, recent trip to historic Olvera Street in downtown L.A. — "It's a little street with little shops resembling any town in Mexico or Latin America" — singer Marisol Hernandez describes the hopes and dreams the city represents.

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Pop Culture
3:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Branding 'Brave': The Cultural Capital Of Princesses

In Brave, the character of Merida is a skilled archer and sword fighter who rebels against what is expected of her as a princess.
Disney/Pixar

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 11:42 am

For little girls, princesses hold roughly the same value that tulips did for the Dutch back in the 1500s, and that princess mania is sure to get a boost with the new Pixar movie Brave, which stars a Scottish princess named Merida.

For a keyhole glimpse into the pink and glittery world of pre-K princess culture, consider the scene at a recent princess-themed birthday party in a suburb of Washington, D.C.

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

A Fight To The Finish For Tennessee Mosque

Construction workers pack up at the end of their workday at the Islamic Center in Murfreesboro, Tenn.
Mark Humphrey AP

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 8:34 pm

The first minarets in Murfreesboro, Tenn., are about to be placed atop a new mosque. But when construction is complete on the new Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, located about 30 miles southeast of Nashville, no one will get to move in.

An ongoing court battle has stalled the project, one of several Islamic centers around the country that, like the so-called ground zero mosque, have encountered resistance from local communities.

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Education
3:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Kids Get Hands-On With Science In A 'Dream Garage'

Community Science Workshops give low-income kids around California opportunities to learn about science firsthand — from holding spiders to building robots.
Amy Standen for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 7:09 am

Many kids who grow up in big cities have lots of opportunities to experience science hands-on. There are zoos, museums, planetariums and school field trips.

But those amenities are sometimes out of reach for lower-income children. And in some rural areas, those opportunities simply don't exist at all.

In California — as in many states — public school science programs have faced deep budget cuts. Many kids have been left behind.

Dan Sudran has taken it upon himself to help close the gap.

Instilling A Love Of Science, Early On

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Middle East
2:59 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Al-Qaida Takes To The Hills Of Yemen's Badlands

A Yemeni army tank fires at positions of al-Qaida militants near the coastal town of Shaqra, Yemen, last week, in a photo provided by Yemen's Defense Ministry. Yemen's army says it has pushed al-Qaida fighters out of towns in the south.
AP

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 10:31 am

Yemen's offensive against al-Qaida has focused on territory in the south of the country that the militants have held for nearly a year. With the backing of the U.S., Yemen's army has cleared al-Qaida and its allies. But many local residents believe the fight is far from over. Kelly McEvers spent several days in southern Yemen and filed this report.

We're in a Yemeni army land cruiser with a shattered windshield. Our destination is the town of Shaqra, the last town in the al-Qaida badlands before the sandy ground turns into mountains.

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Music Interviews
2:29 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

David Byrne Finds A Disco Muse In Imelda Marcos

Musician David Byrne at his rehearsal space at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Mass. Byrne's first musical, Here Lies Love, chronicles the rise and fall of Imelda Marcos.
Andrea Shea NPR

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 3:19 pm

For many, the mention of the Philippines' former first lady Imelda Marcos brings to mind her thousands-strong shoe collection. But the extravagant, ultimately disgraced wife of ousted dictator Ferdinand Marcos makes musician David Byrne think of something different: disco — and power.

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It's All Politics
2:02 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Rubio On Compromise, Immigration And His 'Union Activist' Past

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., delivers a speech during the annual Conservative Political Action Conference in February in Washington.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 3:19 pm

To hear Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tell it, it's happenstance that his newly published memoir, An American Son, became available just as the speculation about Republican vice presidential possibilities is heating up.

Rubio, a rising Cuban-American star in his party, told NPR's Robert Siegel, co-host of All Things Considered, in a Thursday interview:

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Shots - Health Blog
1:08 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Journal Publishes Details On Contagious Bird Flu Created In Lab

Vietnam has contained the fatal bird flu cases that raged in the late 2000s, but it is still struggling with new cases of the virulent disease. Here, a poultry trader loads live chickens onto his motorbike on March 16 at a market outside Hanoi.
Hoang Dinh Ham AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 10:40 am

Anyone and everyone can now look in the journal Science and read about how to make lab-altered bird flu viruses that have been at the center of a controversy that's raged for months.

But in the eyes of some critics, the details of these experiments are effectively the recipe for a dangerous flu pandemic.

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Mom And Dad's Record Collection
12:28 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Santigold: 'Blown Away' By Fela Kuti

Santigold's latest album, Master of My Make-Believe, came out in April.
Sean Thomas

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 2:30 pm

All Things Considered continues its "Mom and Dad's Record Collection" series with singer Santi White, who's best known by her stage name, Santigold.

White says her father steered her artistic development by introducing her to the music of Nigerian Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti at a young age.

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The Salt
12:14 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

California Dairy Farmers Split Over Milk Payments In Farm Bill

A dairy cow peeks out of its stall at Case van Steyn's dairy in Galt, Calif.
Kathleen Masterson NPR

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

California is known as the land of fruits and nuts, but it also happens to be the country's largest milk-producing state. So it's no surprise that its dairy farmers are front and center in the debate over reforming the milk marketing system, which hasn't really changed much in 30 years.

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History
4:23 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

Pakistan's 'Burushaski' Language Finds New Relatives

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's like discovering a distant cousin, a really distant cousin. It's like learning that someone you had barely heard of is actually part of the family. In this case, the family is the Indo-European family of languages. And the umpteenth cousin is a language called Burushaski. It's spoken by about 90,000 people, the Burusho people, and nearly all of them live in Pakistan. A few hundred live in India.

Just to give a sense of what it sounds like, here's a joke in Burushaski that we came across online.

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Food
4:23 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

Pizza Coalition Protests Menu Labeling Proposal

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIEGEL: Well, actually, in Washington...

BLOCK: Where franchisee meets lawmaker...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIEGEL: Yes, that's right. Some of the nation's largest pizza chains are lobbying on Capitol Hill to deliver a piping hot message.

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