All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a3ace1c8428d5e1222b4|5182a3a6e1c8428d5e122298

Pages

U.S.
3:27 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Homeland Security Secretary Defends Executive Actions On Immigration

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 4:33 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Jeh Johnson, secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), about what the effects would be on DHS if Congress did not vote to fund it.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Religion
4:45 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Kansas City Catholics Divided Over Vatican Investigation Of Bishop

Bishop Robert Finn of the Kansas City-St. Joseph Diocese was convicted of shielding a sexually abusive priest in 2012. He is now the subject of a Vatican investigation.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 3:33 pm

A Catholic bishop normally governs pretty much unchecked in his diocese — only the pope can dislodge a bishop. And each time Catholics celebrate Mass in Kansas City, Mo., they pray for Bishop Robert Finn, right after they pray for Pope Francis.

But some Catholics here, like David Biersmith, a Eucharistic minister, refuse to go along.

"When the priest says that, you know, you're supposed say it with him, but I just leave that out," Biersmith says. "I just don't say it. Because he's not my bishop, as far as I'm concerned."

Read more
U.S.
4:19 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

For Some Immigrants, Temporary Life In U.S. Can Mean A Long Stay

Alex Sanchez with his wife, Blanca, and sons Duvan and Irvin. Sanchez has been eligible to live and work legally in the U.S. since 2001, when his home country, El Salvador, experienced a major earthquake.
Alexandra Starr for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Earlier this month, the U.S. government gave more than 200,000 Salvadorans living here temporarily the opportunity to stay for at least another 18 months.

These immigrants are on something called Temporary Protected Status, or TPS. It's for immigrants who are already living in the United States illegally when a natural or humanitarian disaster hits their home country.

Read more
Business
4:11 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Winning The Truck Battle Isn't Just About Smack Talk. It's Everything

Ford's F-150 truck beat the Chevrolet Colorado and Lincoln MKC as the Detroit auto show's 2015 North American Truck of the Year.
He Xianfeng Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 2:25 am

For the Detroit automakers, there's likely no bigger prize than being the No. 1 truck. Pickups represent the lion's share of profits and the industry's recent growth.

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:20 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

A Closer Look At Obama's Plan To Protect Consumer Data

President Obama speaks Tuesday at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, Va.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:55 pm

This week, in the lead up to his State of the Union address, President Obama is talking about cybersecurity — how to ensure our safety in the digital world.

Read more
Africa
3:20 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Boko Haram May Control Up To 20 Percent Of Nigeria

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
The Salt
2:36 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

GMO Potatoes Have Arrived. But Will Anyone Buy Them?

After a turn in the tumbling machine, these conventional russet Burbank potatoes are starting to show signs of bruising. New GMO potatoes called Innate russet Burbanks have been bred not to bruise as easily as these.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 12:43 pm

On the face of it, the new potato varieties called "Innate" seem attractive. If you peel the brown skin off their white flesh, you won't find many unsightly black spots. And when you fry them, you'll probably get a much smaller dose of a potentially harmful chemical.

But here's the catch: Some of the biggest potato buyers in the country, such as Frito-Lay and McDonald's, seem afraid to touch these potatoes. Others don't even want to talk about them because they are genetically modified organisms, or GMOs.

Read more
Europe
2:16 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

'Charlie Hebdo' Keeps The Presses Running, Will Print 3 Milllion Copies

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
2:16 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Book Review: 'Sympathy For The Devil' By Michael Mewshaw

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
4:20 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

The Story Behind '40 Acres And A Mule'

The Green-Meldrim House in Savannah, Ga., is where Gen. William T. Sherman held meetings with local black leaders, creating the plan later known as "40 acres and a mule."
Sarah McCammon NPR

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 12:30 pm

As the Civil War was winding down 150 years ago, Union leaders gathered a group of black ministers in Savannah, Ga. The goal was to help the thousands of newly freed slaves.

From that meeting came Gen. William T. Sherman's Special Field Order 15. It set aside land along the Southeast coast so that "each family shall have a plot of not more than forty acres of tillable ground."

That plan later became known by a signature phrase: "40 acres and a mule."

Read more
The Salt
4:20 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Minifasting: How Occasionally Skipping Meals May Boost Health

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 5:32 am

If you've ever gone to sleep hungry and then dreamed of chocolate croissants, the idea of fasting may seem completely unappealing.

But what if the payoff for a 16-hour fast — which might involve skipping dinner, save a bowl of broth — is a boost in energy and a decreased appetite?

Read more
Around the Nation
3:26 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

An Exhibit Offers A Different Angle On Life In Public Housing

Ephraim Benton, a former resident of Tompkins Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, is now an actor. Benton started a community-based organization called Beyond Influencing Da Hood, which puts on health fairs, film festivals and various free community events in his old housing project. This photo was taken in front of his old building in Tompkins Houses.
Courtesy of Shino Yanagawa

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 4:44 pm

Life in public housing sometimes can be difficult, but it's also a lot like life anywhere — made up mostly of work, school, family and friends. Still, many who don't live in public housing have a negative image of those who do.

Two former residents are trying to change that.

Rico Washington is one of them. The 38-year-old with long dreadlocks and a neatly trimmed beard grew up in Kimberly Gardens public housing apartments in Laurel, Md. When he was younger he was embarrassed about where he lived, he says, and would have co-workers drop him off down the street.

Read more
Parallels
2:57 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

In France's Muslim Community, Stories Of Heroism, And Some Fear

A man walks past a makeshift memorial for French Muslim policeman Ahmed Merabet near the site where he was shot dead by gunmen, close to the headquarters of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 12:59 pm

When Lassana Bathily escaped from a Paris supermarket that was under siege, police at first thought he was the assailant. They forced him to the ground and handcuffed him.

Bathily, 24, is an immigrant from Mali, with the same skin color as the gunman for whom police were hunting. Also like the gunman, Bathily is a Muslim.

Read more
World
2:37 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

U.S. State Dept.: Weak Government Has Slowed Haiti's Recovery

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 4:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Bored ... And Brilliant? A Challenge To Disconnect From Your Phone

Illustration by John Hersey Courtesy of WNYC

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 2:57 pm

Hey smartphone owners — when was the last time you were truly bored? Or even had a moment for mental downtime, unattached to a device?

Read more
Law
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

In South Carolina, Class Action Lawsuit Pits Foster Kids Against State

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 10:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Europe
2:18 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Greeks Shun Mainstream Politics Without Great Alternatives

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 12:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Music News
4:00 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

Country Quartet Little Big Town Finds Fun In Being A Foursome

The Nashville country quartet Little Big Town recently released its sixth studio album, Pain Killer.
Courtesy of Sandbox Entertainment

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 7:36 am

Read more
Movie Interviews
3:45 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

A Half-Century Of Battles For The Biggest Rock Walls

Tommy Caldwell trains on El Capitan's Dawn Wall in Yosemite National Park. Caldwell and fellow climber Kevin Jorgenson are currently attempting the first free climb of the wall.
Brett Lowell

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 8:00 pm

Right now, two men are hanging out on the side of a 3000-foot cliff in Yosemite National Park, hoping to make history. For the last two weeks, they've been free climbing the Dawn Wall of El Capitan. If they succeed, it will be the most difficult climb ever completed.

Read more
Digital Life
3:11 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

Protecting Yourself From Cyberattacks In the New Year

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Europe
3:11 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

World Leaders Join Thousands For Peace Rally In Paris

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Latin America
3:11 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

Recovering From Disaster, Haiti Faces A New Crisis

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Food
4:11 pm
Sat January 10, 2015

In California, Foie Gras Is Back On The Menu

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 12:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Europe
3:37 pm
Sat January 10, 2015

France Still Uneasy After 'Charlie Hebdo' Attacks

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 4:47 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
3:37 pm
Sat January 10, 2015

'Blood Of The Tiger': Shedding Light On China's Farmed-Tiger Trade

Joanne Stemberger iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 4:47 pm

In 1991, wildlife investigator J. A. Mills went to China to verify rumors about tiger farming. She worked undercover, for the World Wildlife Fund and an organization called Traffic.

"I mainly pretended I was a student of traditional Chinese medicine to try to figure out not only what was being traded, but why it was being traded," Mills tells NPR's Arun Rath.

She says she found China's first tiger farm — complete with a hand-written ledgers filling up with orders for tiger bone.

Read more
Middle East
3:37 pm
Sat January 10, 2015

How Does Al-Qaida Continue To Grow?

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 8:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Europe
4:31 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Palpable Relief On Parisian Streets After Hostage Crises End

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Energy
3:42 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Nebraska Ruling On Pipeline Could Be A Blow To TransCanada

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 3:06 pm

The Senate is set to vote on the Keystone XL pipeline, although President Obama has vowed to veto it. What does Nebraska's Supreme Court ruling allowing the pipeline to proceed mean for the administration and those opposed to the expansion? Melissa Block talks with attorney Brian Jorde, who represents the Nebraska landowners challenging the pipeline.

Read more
Movie Interviews
3:24 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

'I Was A Dramatic Kid': For Jessica Chastain, Acting Came Naturally

Jessica Chastain says her grandmother has played a key role in her career. "I've taken her to the Oscars both years," Chastain says. "She's really a special lady and has helped me in more ways than I could ever explain."
Rafa Rivas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 3:06 pm

The new movie A Most Violent Year is set in New York City in 1981 — a chaotic time of spiraling crime. The story involves corruption in the heating oil industry: the hijacking of fuel tankers, a businessman trying to stay on the straight and narrow, and a prosecutor who has that businessman in his sights. And finally, there's the story of the businessman's wife ... who may hold all the cards.

Jessica Chastain plays Anna Morales, the upwardly mobile daughter of a Brooklyn gangster. She keeps the books for her husband's fuel business — as well as a number of secrets.

Read more
Europe
3:24 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Paris Attack Suspects Would Have Been Hard To Track

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 3:06 pm

Robert Siegel talks to Paris-based terrorism and security expert Jean-Charles Brisard about the terrorist cell in France known as the Buttes-Chaumont network in which Cherif Kouachi, one of the suspects in Wednesday's attack in Paris, was involved.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more

Pages