All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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Business
4:05 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Lumber Liquidators Defends Its Products After '60 Minutes' Report

A man walks past a Lumber Liquidators store in Philadelphia. The retailer says it stands by its products and will pay for the safety testing of laminate floors.
Matt Slocum AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

Earlier this month, the flooring retailer Lumber Liquidators got the kind of attention companies dread. CBS' 60 Minutes did a story saying the company's products have unsafe levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen.

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Parallels
4:05 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Drumbeat Grows Louder For Impeachment Of Brazil's Rousseff

Embattled Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (shown here at the 21st International Construction Salon in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Tuesday) was elected four months ago. Her administration has been hit hard by economic problems and a massive corruption scandal at the state oil company, Petrobras.
Nelson Almeida AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

This week, President Dilma Rousseff descended the famous ramp designed by Oscar Neiymeyer in the presidential palace of Planalto to a crowd of women chanting her name.

The carefully choreographed ceremony was intended to show Rousseff — who was signing into law a ban on femicide — as a leader who has broad support.

But the night before the scene was a very different one. While she was addressing the country on TV, people grabbed their pots and pans and banged on them in protest.

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Politics
4:05 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

President Obama Visits Phoenix Hospital At Center Of VA Crisis

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

President Obama and Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald visit the veterans hospital in Phoenix Friday to announce a new outside advisory committee to help the VA with customer service. A scandal last year at the Phoenix facility led to revelations of long wait times for veterans throughout the VA medical system.

Politics
3:04 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Tom Cotton: The Freshman Senator Behind The Iran Letter

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

Freshman Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton, who has been in office barely two months, penned an open letter to Iranian leaders this week that 47 Republican senators signed. NPR profiles the Harvard-trained lawyer and Iraq War veteran.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
2:54 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Dallas Police Make Arrest In Murder Of Iraqi Migrant

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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World
2:54 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

British Military Spending Cutbacks Spark Global Concern

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Remembrances
4:08 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Author Terry Pratchett Was No Stranger To Death

Terry Pratchett wrote more than 70 books.
Rob Wilkins Courtesy of Doubleday

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:44 pm

Fantasy author Sir Terry Pratchett was prolific: He wrote more than 70 books, dozens of them about the Discworld — a flat planet borne through space by four elephants on the back of a giant turtle. Pratchett died Thursday at age 66. He had been suffering from early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

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All Tech Considered
4:08 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Silicon Prairie: Tech Startups Find A Welcoming Home In The Midwest

Lincoln, Neb., is home to several startups, which use the city's low cost of living and high quality of life to attract workers.
Nicolas Henderson Flickr

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 5:50 am

Some startup entrepreneurs are leaving the high tech hot spots of San Francisco, New York and the Silicon Valley for greener pastures in a place that actually has greener pastures: Lincoln, Neb.

In fact, one of the secrets to the economic success of Lincoln, a city with one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country, is a surprisingly strong tech startup community that is part of what some in the region are calling the Silicon Prairie.

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The Salt
4:08 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

A Craft Beer Tax Battle Is Brewing On Capitol Hill

Brewers pay a federal tax on each barrel of beer they produce. Two proposals on Capitol Hill would lower that tax for small brewers, but not everyone's on board.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 5:49 am

Congressman Patrick McHenry is a man who knows his beer. The refrigerator in his Capitol Hill office is filled to the brim with it. The Republican's district includes the city of Asheville, N.C., which claims it has more breweries per capita than any other U.S. city.

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U.S.
2:49 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

In Idaho School District, Preschool At Risk Without Federal Funds

Idaho preschool teacher Mary Allen listens to one of her students during their afternoon snack time. The state doesn't have public preschool, so programs are paid for through a hodgepodge of funding sources.
Emilie Ritter Saunders KBSX

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

The Basin School District in rural south-central Idaho has something most districts in the state don't: preschool. But now that's at risk because of federal funding cuts.

It's not alone: Sparsely populated school districts and counties covered in federal forest lands will have less money this year — $250 million less — because Congress allowed the Secure Rural Schools Act to expire.

Since Idaho doesn't have public preschool, schools that want to offer it have to find creative ways to pay for the program — state money isn't an option.

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It's All Politics
2:42 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Hillary Clinton's Privacy Problem

In April 1994, Hillary Clinton took questions from reporters for more than an hour as first lady. By that point, she had a reputation for not being particularly transparent and for not spending enough time addressing the national media.
Doug Mills AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 2:21 pm

Controversy swirled. The press had questions, a lot of them. And so, finally, Hillary Clinton decided to address reporters.

"Well let me thank all of you for coming," she said, sitting on a low platform in the State Dining Room.

It was April 1994. The first lady wore pale pink and took questions for more than an hour about the Whitewater investigation, cattle futures, the suicide of White House Deputy Counsel Vince Foster and which documents may have been removed from his office. Finally, there was the question of why she had let the scandals fester so long.

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Economy
2:40 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Analysts Mixed On Whether Strong U.S. Dollar Is Positive Or Negative

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

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Around the Nation
8:42 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Police Chief Is Latest Ferguson, Mo., Official To Resign

An assistant chief will replace Tom Jackson; a Justice Department probe following the shooting death of Michael Brown had found serious problems in how the department operated.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Code Switch
6:01 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson.
Andy Manis AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 9:03 pm

Five days after a white police officer shot and killed 19-year-old Tony Robinson, an unarmed black man, in Madison, Wis., protesters are staging large rallies to demand that charges be filed. Meanwhile, officers are rallying at the Wisconsin State Capitol on behalf of the city's police.

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Shots - Health News
4:03 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Results Of Many Clinical Trials Not Being Reported

Glenn Lightner in 2012 at age 13. His father searched clinicaltrials.gov for years, to no avail, hoping to find a promising experimental cancer treatment that might save his son's life.
Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 11:01 am

Many scientists are failing to live up to a 2007 law that requires them to report the results of their clinical trials to a public website, according to a study in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.

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Shots - Health News
4:03 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?

Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 9:08 am

Leon Richardson is 18 years old and tall, charismatic and thoughtful about his sexual health.

He understands that as a young, gay black man, he is in the demographic with the highest rate of HIV infections in the country. But when Richardson learned that he could be part of an HIV prevention pill research study for young people, he was skeptical.

"I was scared. I had to really think about it, 'What is this drug going to do to me?' " he says.

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Business
2:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Targeting Unions: Right-To-Work Movement Bolstered By Wisconsin

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker became a Republican political star by taking on his state's public employee unions. This week he signed a bill that would weaken private-sector unions.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 8:40 pm

This week, Wisconsin became the nation's 25th right-to-work state. It passed a law saying workers cannot be forced to join labor unions, or pay union dues, to keep a job.

There's a concerted effort in many states to pass laws that would weaken the power of labor unions. But unions and their allies are also fighting back in many places.

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Remembrances
2:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

From Stadiums To Shelters: Remembering Pritzker Winner Frei Otto

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 8:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Investigation Continues Into Crash Of Blackhawk Military Helicopter In Fla.

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 8:40 pm

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Religion
3:07 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Southern Baptist Leaders Highlight Benefits Of Youthful Matrimony

Andrew Walker pushed an agenda on youthful matrimony during a recent marriage conference put on by the Southern Baptist's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission.
Blake Farmer WPLN

Leaders of the country's largest Protestant denomination have a message for millennials: get married already.

The Nashville-based Southern Baptist Convention and its nearly 16 million members continue to resist societal trends like gay marriage and cohabitation. They also want to go against the grain on the rising marital age.

But back in 1972, Pam Blume was pretty typical. She was just a few years out of high school when she walked down the aisle.

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Shots - Health News
2:50 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

FDA Decision Signals New Competition For Some Of The Costliest Drugs

A look inside the factory in Kundl, Austria, where Sandoz, a unit of Novartis, makes biosimilar drugs.
Novartis

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 3:46 pm

Mark McCamish spent more than five years preparing for a presentation he gave this winter.

McCamish is in charge of biopharmaceutical drug development at the Sandoz division of Switzerland's Novartis. He and his colleagues made the case to a panel of 14 cancer specialists and a group of Food and Drug Administration regulators that a company drug codenamed EP2006 should be approved for sale in the U.S.

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Science
2:41 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

As Climate Wars Heat Up, Some Skeptics Are Targets

Climate skeptic Willie Soon has argued in the past that too much ice is bad for polar bears. An investigation into Soon's funding found he took money from the fossil fuel industry and did not always disclose that source.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 5:57 pm

Scientists who warn that the earth's climate is changing have been subjected to hacking, investigations, and even court action in recent years. That ire usually comes from conservative groups and climate skeptics seeking to discredit the research findings.

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Around the Nation
2:18 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Owner Unloads Maine Inn For An Essay, Postage And $125

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 3:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
3:24 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Forget Big Sky And Cowboys: 'Crow Fair' Is Set In An Unidealized Montana

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Mon March 9, 2015 6:07 pm

"I think there's only one interesting story ... and that's struggle," says writer Thomas McGuane. Loners, outcasts and malcontents fill the pages of McGuane's latest book — a collection of short stories titled Crow Fair. There's a divorced dad who takes his young son out for an ill-fated day of ice fishing; A restless cattle breeder who takes a gamble on a more lucrative and dangerous line of works; A guy who abandons his blind grandmother by the side of a river to go get drunk, and chase after a corpse he's spotted floating by.

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All Tech Considered
3:24 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Neighbors And Fans Are Curious About Apple's Massive New HQ

The new doughnut-shaped building will be a mile in circumference. "The office areas are laid out in little wedges all around the building," says Dan Whisenhunt, Apple's vice president of real estate and development.
Anya Schultz KQED

Originally published on Mon March 9, 2015 6:07 pm

In Silicon Valley, the world's largest Apple product is taking shape — a glass and concrete ring wider than the Pentagon.

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Books
3:24 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Jynne Dilling Martin's New Poems Capture 'Zaniness Of Being Alive'

Originally published on Mon March 9, 2015 6:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Technology
2:38 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Apple Reveals Details Behind Highly Anticipated Smart Watch

Originally published on Mon March 9, 2015 6:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
2:38 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Oklahoma University Fraternity Closed After Racist Chant Video Posted

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 3:56 pm

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Politics
2:38 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

In Israeli Election, Arab Sportscaster Runs On Ticket Of Mainstream Jewish Party

Originally published on Mon March 9, 2015 6:07 pm

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Pop Culture
6:25 pm
Sun March 8, 2015

Ken Jeong: Doctor By Day, Comedian By Night

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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