All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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Law
4:02 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Undue Burden In Texas At Issue In Federal Court

Women with the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health demonstrate outside of 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday in New Orleans. A federal appeals court in New Orleans is considering whether a Texas law puts up an unconstitutional obstacle to women seeking abortions.
Jonathan Bachman AP

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 4:17 pm

Opening arguments began Wednesday in the case against the Texas law requiring abortion clinics to meet the standards of ambulatory surgery centers. Opponents say it would have the effect of closing a significant number of the state's clinics. Melissa Block talks to Carrie Feibel of Houston Public Media.

Europe
2:58 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

'Charlie Hedbo' A Provocateur, Challenging Status Quo

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:57 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
2:58 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Brain Scans May Help Predict Future Problems, And Solutions

By measuring activity in different parts of the brain, neuroscientsts can get a sense of how some people will respond to treatments.
John Lund Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 3:55 pm

Brain scans may soon be able to help predict a person's future — some aspects of it, anyway.

Information from these scans increasingly is able to suggest whether a child will have trouble with math, say, or whether someone with mental illness is going to respond to a particular treatment, according to a review of dozens of studies published Wednesday in the journal Neuron.

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Health
2:58 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Why The U.S. Still Bans Blood Donations From Some U.K. Travelers

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 4:17 pm

Rules governing who can donate blood in the United States have recently changed. But anyone who spent more than three months in the UK between 1980 and 1996 is still prohibited from donating. That rule is in place to minimize the risk of spreading Mad Cow Disease. Robert Siegel speaks with Dr. Lorna Williamson about how the risk is mitigated in the UK.

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Law
3:45 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Botched Lethal Injection Executions Reignite Death Penalty Debate

Arizona Department of Corrections inmate Joseph Wood was executed by lethal injection in July. It took 15 doses and nearly two hours for him to die.
AP

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:36 pm

This past year, the number of inmates executed in America was the lowest in two decades at 35, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

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Politics
3:45 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Republican Majority Makes Boehner's Job Easier — And Harder

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Research News
2:56 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Kids May Not Benefit From Extended Isolation After Concussions

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:36 pm

New research suggests isolating children with concussions for more than two days may do more harm than good compared to adults. So what's the best approach to treating concussed children? Melissa Block talks with lead researcher Dr. Danny G. Thomas of the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin.

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Business
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

DishTV's New Service Targets Cable Cord Cutters

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Starting Over
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

An Army Chaplain, First Tested By War, Finds His Faith Renewed

As an Army chaplain in Iraq, David Peters administered last rites and grieved with survivors. When he came home, he says, he "fell apart emotionally and spiritually."
Courtesy of Robert K. Chambers

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:25 am

David Peters' life was supposed to be one continuous arc of piety and service.

But for the U.S. Army chaplain, it's ended up a more circuitous route. Peters lost the very faith he was supposed to embody for his soldiers — but has also found his way back.

Peters grew up in a fundamentalist evangelical church in Pennsylvania, served as youth minister and then went to war in Baghdad as a chaplain in the U.S. Army in 2005.

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All Tech Considered
4:37 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 9:00 am

This year, there will be an important change in the way Americans use their credit cards. More banks will be issuing cards with small computer chips, a move they say will protect against credit card fraud.

But banks are stopping short of another step that will make credit card usage even safer. And a lot of retailers aren't too happy about it.

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All Tech Considered
4:36 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Prosecutors Say Tools For Hiding Online Hinder Cybercrime Crackdowns

Using Tor, or The Onion Router, enables users to hide their online activities. Advocates say the network protects the privacy of activists. But prosecutors say it's used extensively by criminals — and is making it harder for law enforcement to do its job.
Daniel Acker Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:30 am

Prosecutors say tools that cloak online identities are complicating their efforts to police all kinds of crime.

Take the case of a former head of cybersecurity for the Department of Health and Human Services, Timothy DeFoggi. Prosecutors say they found graphic images of children on a laptop computer in his home.

DeFoggi once led cybersecurity efforts for HHS, but in this case, the Justice Department says, he used his expertise to hide from the law, along with other users of child porn sites, on a network called Tor.

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Business
3:17 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Low Gas Prices Give SUV Sales A Boost, But Automakers Take Long View

Dodge Ram pickup trucks await customers Jan. 5 on the lot at Landmark Dodge Chrysler Jeep in Morrow, Ga. Buoyed by a resurgent economy, holiday sales, cheap gasoline and a love affair with pickup trucks, Americans headed to car dealers in droves last month, pushing full-year sales to what's likely to be the highest level since 2006.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 6:07 am

Sales of cars surged in December, and analysts believe that the year's total will exceed 17 million, making it the fifth straight year of growth for the industry.

Cheap gas prices helped make that happen, as sales of trucks, SUVs and luxury vehicles rose rapidly. Jeep's sales, for instance, were up 40 percent on increased consumer demand for crossover SUVs. Meanwhile, demand for hybrid and alternative-fuel vehicles shrank.

Scott Painter, founder and CEO of auto sales website TrueCar, says those trends aren't necessarily good for the industry as a whole.

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All Tech Considered
3:17 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Self-Tracking Gadgets That Play Doctor Abound At CES

The San Francisco-based startup CellScope has built a tool to do ear exams at home, instead of going to the doctor.
Cellscope

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:30 am

When your kid's ear is throbbing at 2 a.m., you might want to grab the car keys and head to the emergency room. But now you can pick up your iPhone instead.

A startup called CellScope has built a little ear probe that you clip on top of your iPhone camera. The footage streams into an app where you can view the inside the ear.

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Law
3:17 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Same-Sex Marriages Start In Florida

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today, Florida became the 36th state to legalize gay marriage after an extended legal battle in state and federal courts. NPR's Greg Allen was at the courthouse in Miami for today's ruling.

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Law
2:47 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Tsarnaev Defense Attorney Has Long History With High-Profile Cases

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 9:05 pm

The trial began Monday for the surviving suspect in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. Melissa Block talks to criminal lawyer Jonathan Shapiro about Judy Clarke, one of the defense attorneys representing Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Clarke has represented other high profile defendants, including Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph and Tucson gunman Jared Lee Loughner.

Law
2:30 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Potential Jurors Screened For Boston Marathon Bombing Trial

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Health
2:23 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Big Data Not A Cure-All In Medicine

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
6:54 pm
Sun January 4, 2015

A Shadow Economy Lurks In An Electronics Graveyard

Kwesi Bido, 14, (right) stops to fix 13-year-old Inusa Mohammed's flip flop. Both spend evenings and weekends searching for scrap at Agbogbloshie, an electronic waste dump in Accra, Ghana.
Courtesy of Yepoka Yeebo

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 1:51 pm

The average American produces an estimated 66 pounds of electronic waste every year. You can't compost it; it's gotta go somewhere.

Often, in violation of the law, that means a dump in the developing world — like the region of Agbogbloshie in the West African nation Ghana.

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Author Interviews
4:42 pm
Sun January 4, 2015

How 'Star Wars' Helped Patton Oswalt Beat His Movie Addiction

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 7:37 pm

Before he made it big in Holloywood, actor, writer and comedian Patton Oswalt was a junkie — addicted to movies, as he explains in a new memoir, Silver Screen Fiend.

The word addiction gets thrown around a lot, but Oswalt tells NPR's Arun Rath that his relationship to movies was downright pathological.

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Remembrances
3:45 pm
Sun January 4, 2015

ESPN Sportscaster Stuart Scott Dies At 49

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 6:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's been an exciting weekend in the NFL Playoffs, but there was a sadness pervading ESPN's broadcast today. Treasured colleague Stuart Scott died this morning after a long battle with cancer.

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Opinion
3:45 pm
Sun January 4, 2015

In This New Year, Is It Time To Nix The Thank-You Letter?

Peter Ormerod argues that parents shouldn't force their children to write thank-you cards — it's an exercise in insincerity, he says, and there are better ways to promote gratitude.
Diego Cervo iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 8:09 pm

Now that the holidays are over, another season has arrived. It's time for children to put pen to paper and scratch out thank you letters — all under the watchful eye of their parents.

In a recent piece for The Guardian, Peter Ormerod argues that it's time to do away with that ritual. He writes that thank you letters "represent arguably the first instance in our lives when insincerity is officially sanctioned, which is particularly sad given that the best thing about children is their honesty."

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Starting Over
3:06 pm
Sun January 4, 2015

She Left The Nightlife Behind To Become A Life Coach

Mira Johnson took an unusual route on her journey to becoming a life coach.
Courtesy of Mira Johnson

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 1:45 pm

This is part of a series of stories about starting over, profiling people who, by choice or circumstance, reinvented or transformed themselves.

At just 32, Mira Johnson has made a lot of changes — some drastic. Her choices took her to low points, but also to where she is now: coaching others to make changes themselves.

Perhaps the best place to start her story is with a little-known saying about Portland, Ore.

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The Salt
5:01 pm
Sat January 3, 2015

Marketers Turn To Memories Of Sweeter Times To Sell Cereal

General Mills is bringing back the popular '90s cereal in a nod to nostalgia and in the hopes of boosting its weak cereal sales.
General Mills AP

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 8:54 am

The taste of foods from our childhood can trigger intense emotional reactions. It's a fact well known to students of French literature and marketing executives.

And it's changing the make-up of the cereal aisle. Thanks to the power of food nostalgia, General Mills is bringing back the sugary cereal French Toast Crunch.

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My Big Break
3:57 pm
Sat January 3, 2015

Trading Pom-Poms For Field Boots: Mireya Mayor's Big Break

During a wildlife survey in Madagascar, Mayor discovered a new species of mouse lemur. "[It] weighs less than two ounces, fits in the palm of your hands," she says.
Mark Thiessen Courtesy of Mireya Mayor

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 8:54 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Mireya Mayor's life plays out like an adventure film.

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Sat January 3, 2015

In Preventing Trans Suicides, 'We Have Such A Long Way To Go'

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 12:03 pm

The death of transgender 17-year-old Leelah Alcorn has started a national conversation about the issues faced by trans youth.

Alcorn left behind a suicide note referencing her parents' refusal to accept her identity, saying, "The only way I will rest in peace is if one day transgender people aren't treated the way I was, they're treated like humans, with valid feelings and human rights."

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Interviews
3:19 pm
Sat January 3, 2015

Landing On Your Feet After Falling Through The 'Opportunity Gap'

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 8:54 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Movie Reviews
3:19 pm
Sat January 3, 2015

'Leviathan' A Dark Social Satire Of Russian Society

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:12 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Music News
4:00 pm
Fri January 2, 2015

Wilko Johnson Set Out To Make One Final Album, But It Didn't Work Out That Way

Wilko Johnson (left) and Roger Daltrey play a benefit for Pancreatic Cancer UK in London.
David M. Benett Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 2, 2015 4:23 pm

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Middle East
2:51 pm
Fri January 2, 2015

After Uprising, A Struggle To Restore Tunisia's Ancient Emblems

Originally published on Fri January 2, 2015 4:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Latin America
2:51 pm
Fri January 2, 2015

Why Are Fewer Mexicans Crossing The U.S. Border?

Originally published on Fri January 2, 2015 4:23 pm

More non-Mexicans were apprehended at the southern border than Mexicans in 2014 and apprehensions of Mexicans have fallen to a historic low. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro talks with Jeff Passel of the Pew Research Center.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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