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In jails and prisons across the United States, mental illness is prevalent and psychiatric disorders often worsen because inmates don't get the treatment they need, says journalist Alisa Roth.

In her new book Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness, Roth investigates the widespread incarceration of the mentally ill in the U.S., and what she sees as impossible burdens placed on correctional officers to act as mental health providers when they're not adequately trained.

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Allan Monga, a junior at Deering High School in Portland, Maine, traveled to Washington, D.C. to compete in the Poetry Out Loud contest on Monday. It's a national competition in which students recite great works of poetry, and it's run by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation.

But Monga, who says he fled violence in his home country of Zambia, was initially barred from the national final because of his immigration status: He's an asylum seeker and does not yet have U.S. citizenship.

In 1993, Alex Wagner saw a familiar face on the cover of Time magazine: It was a computer-generated picture of a multiethnic woman who reminded her of ... herself.

Wagner's father is white and from the Midwest; her mother is from what was then Burma. And after reading the Time story on "The New Face of America," Wagner, then a teenager, decided to embrace her identity as a "futureface."

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Twenty-five years ago this week, a web browser called Mosaic was released to the public.

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Musician Bob Dorough died yesterday in Mt. Bethel, Pa. He was 94. A lot of Gen Xers and millennials will know his work.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "SCHOOLHOUSE ROCK!")

BOB DOROUGH: (Singing) As your body grows bigger...

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From San Francisco to Washington, D.C., e-scooters and dockless bikes have become the latest transportation trend to grip urban spaces — and local governments are struggling to keep up.

The concept is simple: Riders download an app, find and unlock a scooter or bike, and leave it when they're done. Many cost as little as $1, and fans of the services tout them as faster, easier, and greener ways to get where they're going.

Killer robots have been a staple of TV and movies for decades, from Westworld to The Terminator series. But in the real world, killer robots are officially known as "autonomous weapons."

At the Pentagon, Paul Scharre helped create the U.S. policy for such weapons. In his new book, Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War, Scharre discusses the state of these weapons today.

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We're following a breaking story out of Toronto this hour. Police there say nine people are dead after a van drove onto a busy sidewalk and plowed into pedestrians. At least 16 others are injured. Here's what an eyewitness named Phil Zullo told NPR.

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Let's get the view from France now on French president Emmanuel Macron's state visit to Washington. Nicole Bacharan, a researcher with the National Foundation for Political Sciences in Paris, joins us via FaceTime. Welcome.

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The leaders of North and South Korea will meet on Friday. And ahead of that summit, things have gotten quieter in the DMZ, the demilitarized zone between the two countries. For the moment, no more of this.

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NPR Poetry Month: Andrea Davis Pinkney

Apr 21, 2018

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Can I Just Tell You: Barbara Bush

Apr 21, 2018

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A startup company in California is using machine learning and artificial intelligence to advise fire departments about how to plan for earthquakes and respond to them.

The company, One Concern, hopes its algorithms can take a lot of the guesswork out of the planning process for disaster response by making accurate predictions about earthquake damage. It's one of a handful of companies rolling out artificial intelligence and machine learning systems that could help predict and respond to floods, cyber-attacks and other large-scale disasters.

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