All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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For more than a decade, Reeves Gabrels was David Bowie's go-to guitarist, playing in the rock band Tin Machine and crafting '90s Bowie on albums like Outside, Earthling and 'hours...' The world is mourning the visionary chameleon, who died Sunday at 69, but Gabrels also wants to remember Bowie's sense of humor.

"The picture I have in my head is of him cracking up in the studio," Gabrels says. "Because we just used to be able to make each other laugh."

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Pilot Programs Help Former Convicts Find Housing

Jan 10, 2016
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Oregon Armed Occupation Continues

Jan 9, 2016
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More than a week has passed since armed men took over the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. The self-described militiamen are demanding that the federal government give up that land for people to use for ranching, mining and logging.

But there's another group with roots on that land: Native Americans, especially the Burns Paiute tribe. The wildlife refuge is part of the tribe's ancestral lands.

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In this week's Barbershop, Anil Dash, a tech writer in New York, Rev. Kenn Blanchard, a gun rights enthusiast and NPR's Gene Demby talk about President Obama's tearful moment on gun policy earlier this week. They also discuss how the Netflix series Making a Murderer is shaking up the way people think about criminal justice.

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At the end of every year, U.S. meteorologists look back at what the nation's weather was like, and what they saw in 2015 was weird. The year was hot and beset with all manner of extreme weather events that did a lot of expensive damage.

December, in fact, was a fitting end.

It's unusual to hear a current NFL player criticize the league, let alone talk frankly about its handling of concussions or its response to domestic violence scandals.

But a new book does just that. It's called NFL Confidential, a memoir of the 2014 football season written by a player who goes only by Johnny Anonymous.

The player spoke with All Things Considered host Audie Cornish this week, after NPR confirmed his identity before the interview.

He says he loves playing the game but thinks the NFL is manipulative and exploitative.

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The new movie "Carol" is a love story between two women set in 1952. It stars Cate Blanchett as society woman Carol Aird and Rooney Mara as department store saleswoman Therese Belivet.

When Saudi Arabia executed 47 people last week, it marked an ominous start to surpassing the number of people it put to death last year. Human rights groups believe at least 150 people were executed in the kingdom in 2015. Most were beheaded, killed by firing squad or stoned to death.

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North Korea was celebratory in its claims that it detonated its first hydrogen bomb on Wednesday.

"Through the test conducted with indigenous wisdom, technology and efforts [North Korea] fully proved that the technological specifications of the newly developed H-bomb for the purpose of test were accurate and scientifically verified the power of smaller H-bomb," the country's official news agency reported.

But the White House, along with many others, isn't buying it.

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There's something of a tactical vibe at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, where a group of armed men have taken over buildings to protest federal control over public land in the West.

The men who have blocked the driveway address each other on their radios with code names such as "Infidel" and "Rogue," and talk about maintaining "OPSEC" — or "operational security."

One of the men, who won't give his name, says if law enforcement shows up, it'll show up big.

"You'll know when it happens because you'll hear the helicopters," he says.

At the kickoff of a six-day campaign swing through Iowa, there's no mistaking which voters Ted Cruz is trying to reach — evangelicals.

King's Christian Bookstore in Boone was the first of 28 stops this week. Before he began his pitch, he cited Scripture he saw on the wall.

"I was looking up and seeing Joshua 24:15 on the wall: 'Choose you this day whom you will serve. As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.' "

The small eastern European nation of Slovakia has not exactly welcomed migrants.

Federal immigration agents have initiated a controversial roundup of Central American families who were part of the border surge that began in 2014.

They are mainly young mothers with children whose asylum claims have been rejected. The Homeland Security Department says 121 have been picked up out of more than 100,000 immigrants who crossed the border illegally.

At a shelter home in East Austin, the raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, have terrified immigrants here who lost their cases and await deportation.

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