All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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It's All Politics
5:23 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Court Sides With President Over Congress In 'Jerusalem' Passport Dispute

Ari Zivotofsky (right) with his son, Menachem, outside the Supreme Court in 2011. Menachem, now 12, was born in Jerusalem, but the court ruled Israel cannot be noted as the birthplace on his passport.
Evan Vucci AP

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday sided with the president in a long-running struggle with Congress over who controls recognition of foreign countries and what information about nationhood can be put on the passports of American citizens.

In a 6-to-3 decision, the high court struck down a law requiring the State Department to indicate on passports that the city of Jerusalem is part of Israel. The decision was a blow to the pro-Israel lobby and to congressional power over certain parts of foreign policy.

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Music
3:18 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Apple Jumps Into Music Streaming Business

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 4:37 am

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Afghanistan
3:18 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Afghan Women Climbers Face Challenges Beyond Scaling Summit

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 7:59 pm

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Iraq
3:18 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Ramadi, Iraq, Offensive Delays Efforts To Take Back Mosul

Originally published on Tue June 16, 2015 10:45 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
3:18 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Syrian Mother Sends Children Across Mediterranean With Smugglers

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 4:56 pm

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All Tech Considered
4:25 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

At DARPA Challenge, Robots (Slowly) Move Toward Better Disaster Recovery

The robot from Florida-based Team IHMC Robotics takes a tumble as it tries to walk over rubble. This team came in second place and won a $1 million prize.
DARPA Robotics Challenge

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 11:10 am

Earlier this week, 23 robots from all over the world competed in Pomona, Calif., for a $2 million prize in the DARPA Robotics Challenge. And thousands of humans watched as the machines showed off their skills on the course.

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Author Interviews
4:21 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

In Debut Novel, Air Force Officer Questions How We Honor Our Veterans

Lydia Thompson NPR

Why do we honor combat veterans? In his new novel, Air Force officer Jesse Goolsby asks that question through the stories of three veterans, their experiences in war and their lives back at home.

I'd Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them is grounded in the wars of the last 15 years, but Goolsby points out the action takes place as much in the private lives the men lead in America as it does on the battlefield.

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All Tech Considered
4:21 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 12:23 pm

Like it or not, much of what we encounter online is mediated by computer-run algorithms — complex formulas that help determine our Facebook feeds, Netflix recommendations, Spotify playlists or Google ads.

But algorithms, like humans, can make mistakes. Last month, users found the photo-sharing site Flickr's new image-recognition technology was labeling dark-skinned people as "apes" and auto-tagging photos of Nazi concentration camps as "jungle gym" and "sport."

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Middle East
3:19 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

Saudi Supreme Court Upholds Blogger's Prison And Lashing Sentence

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 4:21 pm

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Code Switch
3:19 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

Beyond College-Ready: Top Charter Schools Support Graduates In College

Students from a Harlem Children's Zone school visit Hunter College in New York. College visits are one way schools encourage students to attend college after graduation; now, a growing number of schools are working to help students succeed in college as well.
Courtesy of Harlem Children's Zone

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 5:15 am

It's high school graduation season, when many students are celebrating the end of their high school career. But some schools are deciding that their job doesn't end with the granting of a diploma — or even a send-off to college.

Top charter schools can often boast of sending virtually all of their graduates to college, even when the majority of their students are low-income or are the first members of their families to pursue post-high school educations.

As it turns out, many of those students don't earn a degree.

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Music News
3:19 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

With The Spotlight Gone, Omaha's Music Scene Grows

Omaha rapper Conchance outside of Make Believe Studios near downtown Omaha, Neb.
Courtesy of Clay Masters

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 1:23 pm

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U.S.
3:26 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

Wimberley Residents Leery Of River Weeks After Devastating Floods

Kelly O'Keefe is usually volunteering to help others. Now she's accepting help from strangers after her home was destroyed by floods. "It's really difficult to be the one with my hand out," she says.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 5:27 pm

Today, nearly two weeks after the catastrophic Memorial Day floods in Texas, search crews are still combing the banks of the Blanco River looking for three people who remain missing. They've already found eight bodies.

Meanwhile, residents of the tourist and retirement town of Wimberley, Texas, hit hardest by the flood, are cleaning up and struggling to reclaim their lives.

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Author Interviews
3:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

'Balm' Looks At Civil War After The Battles, Outside The South

Courtesy of Amistad

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 11:22 am

Dolen Perkins-Valdez wants to change readers' perspective on the Civil War. Her best-selling debut novel, Wench, explored the lives of slave women — not on Southern plantations, but in a resort for slaveowners' mistresses in Ohio. Her new book, Balm, is set in the postwar period, and it's also in an unexpected place: Chicago.

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World
3:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

Fighting In Eastern Ukraine Ramps Up, Raises Fears

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 4:40 pm

Renewed fighting in Eastern Ukraine marked an end to a tenuous cease-fire agreed to in February. NPR's Corey Flintoff explains that international observers fear that a surge in violence could plunge the region into another full scale war.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Ed
3:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

From Bail Bondsman To Teacher

Rodney Carey (left) with students at the Youth Empowerment Project in New Orleans.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 4:40 pm

In a windowless classroom, in a tough New Orleans neighborhood, a middle-aged man with piercing eyes is teaching math at top volume.

"I got a SINGLE DOLLAR if someone can tell me what's the RULE to this problem!" he intones.

Today's lesson is about the order of operations, a topic usually taught in elementary school. On average, Rodney Carey's students are working at a fifth-grade level. But they are much older, aged 16 to 24.

Mr. Rodney, as he is known, does whatever he can to motivate them, whether that's ordering in Chinese food or giving out cash prizes.

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NPR Story
3:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

New Nonprofit Supermarket Fills Shelves With Surplus Stock

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 4:40 pm

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The Salt
4:47 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Halibut Dumping Stirs Fight Among Fishing Fleets In Alaska

Pacific Halibut caught in Cook's Inlet, Alaska.
via Wikimedia

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 1:04 pm

If you've ever encountered halibut, it was probably as a tasty — and pricey — entree. But in Alaska, it's the subject of a fierce fish battle. On one side are small family-owned fishing boats. On the other, an industrial fleet delivering seafood to the world. This weekend, federal managers are trying to decide how both sides can survive.

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U.S.
4:00 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Baltimore Community Engagement Efforts Slowed By Crime Spike

A Baltimore police officer attempts to secure a crime scene with tape at the scene of a shooting at the intersection of West North Avenue and Druid Hill Avenue in West Baltimore, Md., on May 30. Local media have reported more than 35 murders in the city since the April rioting over the death of 25-year-old resident Freddie Gray.
Jim Bourg Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 4:47 pm

Mistrust between police and residents in West Baltimore is longstanding, and the fallout from the death of Freddie Gray has only heightened it.

Both sides now say they're taking steps to restore that trust, including one-on-one meetings and a neighborhood cookout. But community leaders say the ongoing spike in violence threatens to undermine such efforts.

The community group No Boundaries holds lots of listening sessions in West Baltimore. Organizer Rebecca Nagle says at one, well before Gray's death, people were asked: Who has the most power in your community?

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Sports
4:00 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

NCAA Tests Out Flat-Seamed Baseballs To Boost Batting Averages

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 4:47 pm

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Movie Interviews
4:00 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

In 'Testament Of Youth,' A Nurse Tells The Story Of World War I

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 4:47 pm

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National Security
3:10 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Why Are Only Three Observant Sikh Men Serving In The U.S. Military?

Army Cpl. Simranpreet Lamba (center) stands in formation with fellow soldiers before taking the oath of citizenship, prior to his graduation from basic training at Fort Jackson, S.C., in 2010. He was the first enlisted soldier to be granted a religious accommodation as a Sikh since 1984.
Brett Flashnick AP

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 6:24 pm

If a Muslim woman may wear a headscarf at work, as the U.S. Supreme Court has now affirmed, perhaps a Sikh man should be able to wear a turban while serving in the U.S. military.

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Law
3:07 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

'Guardian' Database Highlights Underreporting Of People Killed By Police

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 4:47 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with reporter Jon Swaine about The Guardian database on U.S. fatal police killings in 2015. The news outlet recorded figures twice as high as those reported by the FBI.

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Politics
3:07 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

If Ohio Gov. John Kasich Runs For President, He Could Be A Wildcard

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 4:47 pm

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Goats and Soda
5:06 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Viral Superspreader? How One Man Triggered A Deadly MERS Outbreak

Patient one: A businessman brought the Middle East respiratory syndrome to South Korea in early May. Since then, he has likely spread the virus to more than 20 other people. Several of those have passed the virus onto others.
Maia Majumder/Health Map

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 7:20 am

An outbreak of a deadly virus in South Korea has set off alarms across the region.

In the past week, South Korea's confirmed cases of the Middle East respiratory syndrome have more than tripled to 41, with at least three deaths. About 1,600 people are quarantined and more than 1,000 schools are closed.

It's the largest outbreak of MERS outside Saudi Arabia. And researchers around the world have been trying to figure out why the outbreak in South Korea has gotten so large, so fast.

Now researchers have a clue: a superspreader event.

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Environment
4:47 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Scientists Cast Doubt On An Apparent 'Hiatus' In Global Warming

A fully loaded container ship sails along the coast. Historically, ships have taken most of the sea measurements that go into the estimate of Earth's average surface temperature.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 6:31 pm

A team of government scientists has revised its estimate for how much the planet has been warming.

The new results, published in the journal Science, may dispel the idea that Earth has been in the midst of a "global warming hiatus" — a period over the past 20 years where the planet's temperature appears to have risen very little.

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National Security
4:45 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Chinese Hackers Breach Government Personnel Office Computers

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 6:50 pm

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Sports
3:57 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Former Goalie Says U.S. Women's Soccer Team Looks 'Incredibly Strong'

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 6:50 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
3:57 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

A 25-Year-Old Opera Composer Who Does It All

Composer, librettist and conductor Matthew Aucoin in rehearsal.
Jeremy Daniel American Repertory Theater

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 6:31 am

Matthew Aucoin is being compared to Mozart, Wagner and Leonard Bernstein. He's worked with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

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Law
3:31 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Family Of Suspected Terrorist Killed By Boston Police Call For Investigation

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 6:50 pm

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Music
2:57 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

NPR Asks: What's On Your Road-Trip Playlist?

Crank up the volume and give the All Things Considered road-trip playlist a test drive.
Thomas Barwick Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 6:50 pm

The All Things Considered road-trip playlist is adding songs every week, thanks to the magic of crowdsourcing. We've asked for the songs listeners say they must hear on a long summer drive, and we've received more than 2,000 suggestions. You can listen to some of them here via our Spotify playlist — now featuring some of the songs listeners have brought to our attention.

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