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NPR Story
12:36 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Virginia Sen. Kaine On The U.S. Intervention In Iraq

Displaced Iraqi Yazidis, who fled a jihadist onslaught on Mt. Sinjar, gather to collect bottles of water at the Bajid Kandala camp in Kurdistan's western Dohuk province, on August 13. Scores of young men and children held a protest demanding more aid at the Bajid Kandala camp that is hosting thousands of desperate Iraqi Yazidis. (Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 1:47 pm

The Pentagon now says a large-scale refugee operation to save people stranded on Mt. Sinjar in northern Iraq probably won’t be needed. That’s because a U.S. team on the ground there found fewer refugees than first thought, and said that thousands of Yazidis, a religious minority, had already fled.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

DJ Sessions: Country's Vast Age Range

Emi Sunshine, pictured here at age 9, recorded her first two albums by the time she was 7 years old. (Emi Sunshine/Facebook)

Marcia Campbell of “The WSM All Nighter” show on 650 AM WSM in Nashville joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for the latest installment of DJ Sessions.

She tells us about a number of young up-and-coming artists, including Emi Sunshine, who is just 10 years old. We also hear songs from Brendan MacFarlane, the late Jack Clement and Willie Nelson, who has a new album out.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

Red Tide Approaches Florida

A red tide off the coast of La Jolla San Diego, California. (Mortadelo2005/Wikimedia Commons)

A massive algae bloom known as red tide is encroaching on the Gulf Coast of Florida.

Researchers say it’s killing thousands of fish and other sea animals.

The algae are a natural part of life in the gulf — the blood-red blooms have been showing up in the water around Florida for centuries. This newest tide is the largest the state has seen in nearly 10 years. It’s 80 miles long and 50 miles wide.

Alina Corcoran, a researcher with Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission,

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

Gaza Protests In Germany Stir Debate Over Anti-Semitism

Pro-Israel protesters yell at demonstrators celebrating Al-Quds Day, an event intended to express solidarity with the Palestinian people, on July 25, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. Pro-Palestinian demonstrators marched through Berlin, closely watched by police for any expressions of anti-Semitism and separated from smaller pro-Israel rallies. (Adam Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Across Europe, the conflict between Israel and Gaza has sparked large protests, including in Germany, home to around four million Muslims, or 5 percent of the population. Dozens of demonstrations against Israel’s policy in Gaza have been held across the country over the last few weeks.

But because Nazi Germany engineered the Holocaust, many Germans today feel uncomfortable criticizing Israel.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

30 Rockefeller Plaza To Get A Facelift

The GE sign atop 30 Rockefeller Plaza on May 24, 2006. (dmamundsen/Flickr)

One of the most recognizable buildings in New York City is getting a makeover.

The art deco building at 30 Rockefeller Plaza (“30 Rock”) — the headquarters of NBC — will be getting new LED-lit signs on three of its facades bearing the name of Comcast, NBC’s latest corporate owner.

This will replace the neon G.E. logo that had been at the top of the building since the late 1980s. For the first time, the iconic NBC peacock will also be placed high in white lights on the building’s exterior.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

Waiters Not The Only Ones Paid Below Minimum Wage

Many wheelchair attendants at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport make less than minimum wage. (Wilson Sayre/WLRN)

Not every worker makes minimum wage. Waiters, for instance, rely on tips to round out much of their pay.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Wilson Sayre of WLRN brings us a story about another type of worker that relies on tips: airport wheelchair pushers, who also make less than minimum wage. But it’s not so obvious that you’re supposed to tip them.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

FBI To Investigate Fatal Shooting Of Teen In St. Louis Suburb

Protestors confront police during an impromptu rally, Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014 to protest the shooting of Michael Brown, 18, by police in Ferguson, Mo. Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014. Brown died following a confrontation with police, according to St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar, who spoke at a news conference Sunday. (Sid Hastings/AP)

The FBI has said it will investigate the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, an African American 18-year-old. Authorities say a police officer shot the unarmed Brown after the teen allegedly attacked him.

The incident sparked protests, violence and looting. Today, more than 100 protesters gathered outside the Ferguson, Mo. police station in suburban St. Louis to demand answers.

Teachers called Brown a “gentle giant” who was to begin college in a few days. Brown’s mother condemned the lootings and the family called for peace and justice.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri August 8, 2014

On Stage: Christian Rap At Rap Fest

Rap Fest is a Christian rap outreach festival in the Bronx. This is its 21st year. (Steven Sanchez)

Originally published on Fri August 8, 2014 1:53 pm

“On Stage” is our weekly look at what’s happening on the boards across the country, from comedy shows to poetry slams to music festivals.

Today, we turn now to Rap Fest, a Christian rap outreach festival tomorrow in the Bronx in Vidalia Park. This is its 21st year.

Co-founder Bert Bocachica joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about the festival.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri August 8, 2014

Will Marijuana Follow In The Steps Of Big Tobacco?

The New York Times this week carried its first-ever full-page ad for a marijuana company. It’s a Seattle-based firm called Leafly, which is like “Yelp” for pot, giving reviews of different strains of cannabis and places where you can buy it.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri August 8, 2014

Tropical Storm Iselle Makes Landfall On Hawaii

Anne Kllingshirn, of Kailua, Hawaii walks with her daughter Emma, 1, as storm clouds float overhead during the sunrise hours on Kailua Beach, in Kailua, Hawaii, Thursday morning Aug. 7, 2014. (Luci Pemoni/AP)

The National Weather Service says the eye of Tropical Storm Iselle has made landfall on Hawaii’s Big Island.

It is the first hurricane or tropical storm to hit the state in 22 years, and another hurricane is following in its path. Hurricane Julio, a Category 3 storm, is about 1,000 miles behind in the Pacific.

Iselle’s eye swept onto shore about 5 miles east of Pahala with winds at 60 mph at 2:30 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

'Brokeback Mountain' Composer Releases New Album, 'Camino'

Soundtrack composer Gustavo Santaolalla performs onstage during The Last of Us: One Night Live reading and performance at The Broad Stage on July 28 in Santa Monica, California. (Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images for Sony Computer Entertainment America)

The haunting theme music from the 2005 film “Brokeback Mountain” earned musician Gustavo Santaolalla the first of his two Oscars. He got a second the following year for his work on “Babel.” The Argentine composer, who moved to the U.S. in the 1970s, has also won 16 Grammy awards.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

Company Seeks Approval For Experimental Ebola Drug

In this handout from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), a colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Ebola virus virion is seen. (Center for Disease Control via Getty Images)

There is no known cure for the Ebola virus, but a number of labs have been working on one. The two American relief workers recently flown back from Liberia have been receiving an experimental treatment produced by a company in San Diego.

Another company, Cambridge, Mass.-based Sarepta Therapeutics, also has an experimental drug. The company’s CEO, Chris Garabedian, tells Here & Now’s Robin Young how this treatment would work, and what it takes to get the drug to patients.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

U.S. Weighs Humanitarian Aid To Help Trapped Iraqis

The Obama administration is weighing an urgent response to help trapped religious minorities in Iraq, with one option being delivery of humanitarian aid.

That’s according to two people familiar with administration discussions. Top administration officials are meeting about the options at the White House Thursday.

The urgency comes as Sunni extremists have made major gains in Iraq’s north. The extremists took over the Kurdish town of Sinjar, forcing its population of Yazidi minorities to flee with little food or water.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Music From The Show

Ratatat, “Falcon Jab”

Aesop Rock, “Forest Crunk”

Ben Jordan, “Leaving Earth”

Bear In Heaven, “Autumn”

Aesop Rock, “Cycles To GeHenna”

The Album Leaf, “Thule”

Konk, “Baby Dee”

The American Dollar, “Time”

LCD Soundsystem, “Dance Yrslf Clean”

Debruit, “Nigeria What?”

Lifeformed, “Cider Time”

Faraquet, “Conceptual Separation Of Self”

Nah Dran, “Couch”

Fugazi, “Target”

Bo Diddley, “Bo’s Guitar”

Tame Impala, “Enders Toi”

The Evens, “Shelter Two”

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Mo Rocca's Cooking Show Features Recipes From Grandparents

Mo Rocca's show ""My Grandmother's Ravioli" kicks off its third season tonight. (Cooking Channel)

Comedian Mo Rocca loved his grandmother’s cooking, but never learned to cook.

In the third season of his Cooking Channel show, “My Grandmother’s Ravioli,” he visits grandmothers and grandfathers, and learns about some of their favorite recipes, as well as stories from their pasts.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Battle Lines Drawn Over Value-Added Teacher Assessment

A tool used in states around the country to assess teacher performance has become a lightning rod in public education circles.

The “value-added assessment” is embraced by the Obama Administration and has financial support from the Gates Foundation. The assessment compares student test performance growth from year to year.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Bobby Allyn of WPLN reports that proponents say it’s a good tool to measure teachers.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Walgreens Plans Foreign Merger Without Moving Headquarters

People walk by a Walgreens store on June 19, 2012 in San Francisco, California. U.S. based drug store chain Walgreens has announced a deal to purchase a 45 percent stake in European pharmacy retailer Alliance Boots for $6.7 billion. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The Illinois-based drugstore chain Walgreens is moving ahead with a foreign merger with the Swiss-based company Alliance Boots.

But Walgreens will continue to be based in the U.S., even as some health care companies have been striking foreign merger deals in order to relocate overseas and pay lower taxes — a practice that is known as an inversion.

Joe Weisenthal of business insider joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Paul Reiser Tells Stories About Some Of Comedy's Greats

Actor Paul Reiser speaks onstage at the 'Married' panel during the FX Networks portion of the 2014 Summer Television Critics Association at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on July 21, 2014 in Beverly Hills, California. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Actor Paul Reiser is best known for his hit 1990s TV show “Mad About You.” Since then, he has worked in film and returned to his roots in stand-up comedy.

But this week, he published a Kindle “single” called “How To Get To Carnegie Hall” that taps into memories of his time on “Mad About You,” and the lessons he’s learned from the comedic greats.

Guest

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Tribune Company Spins Off Print Division

The Chicago Tribune is one of eight big newspapers being spun off into a new company called Tribune Publishing. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

If you follow the New York Stock Exchange closely, you might notice a new media company listed there today. It’s Tribune Publishing — formerly the publishing division of the Tribune Company, including the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune, among others.

Starting today, Tribune Publishing with go it alone. Also today, the Gannett Company said that it plans to spin off its print operations, including USA Today.

There have been similar moves by other media companies, such as Time Warner, which has decided to spin-off its more than 90 magazines.

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

U.S. Officials: U.S. General Killed In Afghan Attack

General view of a military academy base after an Afghan soldier opened fire on NATO troops inside the premises, on the outskirts of Kabul on August 5, 2014. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. officials say a U.S. two-star general was killed in an apparent insider attack by a member of the Afghan security forces.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the information by name ahead of an official announcement.

The attacker wounded approximately 15 people, of which roughly half were Americans, one official said.

A man dressed in an Afghan army uniform opened fire on foreign troops at Camp Qargha, a base west of the capital, Kabul. Among the wounded was a German brigadier general.

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

Book Gives Fly-On-The-Wall Access To Nixon Presidency

Republican president of the United States Richard Nixon thumbing up after announcing his resignation from the presidency after the Watergate scandal on August 9, 1974. (AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 2:37 pm

Forty years ago this week, Richard Nixon resigned from the presidency as a result of the Watergate scandal. Now, a new book gives insight into Richard Nixon, pre-Watergate.

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

Peter O'Dowd's Cross-Country Road Trip

A shot of Gallup, N.M., where Peter O'Dowd stopped off on his cross-country trip. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 10:03 am

On July 19, Peter O’Dowd left his job as news director of KJZZ in Phoenix, Arizona, packed up his things into a two-door Honda Accord and embarked on a six-day journey across the U.S. to start his job as assistant managing editor of Here & Now.

He joins hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young to discuss some of the people he met along the way, during the 3,000-mile trip.

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NPR Story
12:59 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

United States And Africa Deepen Business Ties

A sign advertising the US-Africa Leaders Summit hangs from a light pole outside the US State Department in Washington, DC, July 31, 2014. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 3:10 pm

Today is the first day of the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, a three-day event organized by the White House with the theme “Investing in the Next Generation.”

It has drawn leaders from nearly 50 African countries, as well as the executives of several large U.S. companies, interested in pursuing business opportunities in Africa.

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NPR Story
12:36 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Widow Of American Ebola Victim Speaks Out

Decontee Sawyer, wife of Liberian government official Patrick Sawyer, a U.S. citizen who died from Ebola after traveling from Liberia to Nigeria, cradles her 1-year-old daughter Bella at her home in Coon Rapids, Minn., Tuesday, July 29 (Craig Lassig/AP).

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 1:08 pm

The Ebola outbreak that’s killed more than 670 people in West Africa has hit too close to home for some Americans.

Decontee Sawyer lives in Minnesota, which is home to Liberia’s largest diaspora community. Her husband, a Liberian government official, recently contracted the virus in Liberia and became the first American to die from Ebola in this outbreak.

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NPR Story
12:36 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

District Profile: Virginia's 7th Congressional

Republican candidate David Brat (left), who defeated Rep. Eric Cantor in the primary, will face Democrat Jack Trammell in November. (Facebook)

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 11:23 am

Eric Cantor officially stepped down as House Majority Leader today. He will be replaced in the leadership by Kevin McCarthy of California after losing in a primary for his Virginia congressional seat.

Cantor’s district, Virginia’s 7th congressional, is the focus of this week’s installment of District Profiles, looking at congressional races across the country. Republican candidate David Brat, who defeated Cantor in the primary, will face Democrat Jack Trammell.

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NPR Story
12:36 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Facebook Targets Zambia With Free App

Facebook-founded Internet.org aims to increase Internet accessibility on a global level. (Internet.org)

Altruism or good business? Today, Facebook launched a free mobile app in Zambia.

The company says people who can’t afford Internet service in the poor African country will have a new way to find jobs and get health advice on pregnancy and childbirth.

It’s the latest in Facebook’s Internet.org initiative, a larger push to reach millions of potential customers in developing countries.

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Argentina Scrambles To Avoid Default

Retired citizens await the opening of the Banco Provincia bank headquarters in the financial district near Plaza de Mayo square to collect their pensions, in Buenos Aires on July 30, 2014. Last-ditch talks aimed at averting Argentina's second default in 13 years were to resume Wednesday in New York, after Tuesday's marathon session failed to reach a deal. (Daniel Garcia/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed July 30, 2014 1:43 pm

An American judge has ordered Argentina to make debt payments of $1.5 billion to American creditors. But time is running out.

If Argentina doesn’t pay the U.S. hedge funds by midnight, it will default on its bond payments for the second time in 13 years. The last default, in 2001, led Argentinians to protest the declining economic conditions in their country.

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

As War And Conflicts Proliferate, Children Become Unwary Victims And Targets

The latest video released by Boko Haram of the kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls shows the girls dressed in full hijab and chanting passages from the Koran. (Screenshot)

Originally published on Wed July 30, 2014 1:43 pm

With political, military, economic and religious strife proliferating globally, children are increasingly turning up in the headlines.

And while kids have always suffered during the turmoils of war and crisis, there’s a sense internationally that the burden of instability is being increasingly borne by children.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

DJ Sessions: Yesterday's Covers, From 'Hound Dog' To 'The Twist'

American rock singer Elvis Presley serenades a basset hound in a top hat with the song, "Hound Dog" on the set of "The Steve Allen Show" in July 1956. (NBC Television/Getty Images)

DJ Paul Ray, host of the rhythm and blues show “Twine Time” on KUTX in Austin, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for the latest installment of DJ Sessions. He shares a number of songs with original versions that may not be the ones we remember.

He shares famous covers that people may not know are covers, like Elvis’s “Hound Dog,” Peggy Lee’s “Fever” and Chubby Checker’s “The Twist.”

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Music From The Show

Gold Panda, “An Iceberg Hurled Northward”

Micah Blue Smaldone, “Heavy Bottle”

Obfusc, “Sounds From Shattered Seashells”

The Cure, “Close To Me”

Broken Social Scene, “Guilty Cubicle”

Isotope 217, “La Jete”

Women, “Heat Distraction”

Todd Terje, “Delorean Dynamite”

Dirty Gold, “California Sunrise”

Mux Mool, “Night Court”

Tycho, “Hours”

Corkbush Field Mutiny, “MAELSTROM”

Wife, “Bodies”

Wild Nothing, This Chain Won’t Break”

Miles Davis, “Maiysha”

Shark?, “Big Summer, (Summer Ale)”

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