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Here & Now

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NPR's midday news magazine.  

The new Netflix original series, “Stranger Things,” features the residents of a small town in Indiana and their search for a middle school boy who mysteriously goes missing. Winona Ryder plays the boy’s frantic mother, but the cast is otherwise a mash of character actors and children.

NPR’s Eric Deggans speaks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about the show’s monumental popularity, Ryder’s performance and a minor character who’s stolen the internet’s heart.

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After 27-year-old Seth Rich was shot to death in Washington, D.C. on July 10, rumors started that his death was linked to his work for the Democratic National Committee.

There was even the suggestion that Rich was the source of the emails given to WikiLeaks that embarrassed the DNC as its convention was starting in Philadelphia. WikiLeaks won’t confirm or deny that, but it is offering a $20,000 reward for information that leads to a conviction in the case.

A fast-moving fire in San Bernardino, California has now engulfed more than 6,000 acres, as two fires in Northern California continue to burn.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with UCLA professor Glen MacDonald about how these fires started and what it means for the rest of 2016.

Donald Trump is planning to roll out a slew of new policy proposals in coming weeks as he continues to try to steady his floundering campaign.

Trump has largely avoided policy specifics in his campaign, focusing instead on broad goals.

Trump says that he will unveil a proposal to reduce the cost of childcare and increase choices for parents.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young recaps Trump’s speech before the Detroit Economics Club with NPR’s Jim Zarroli.

A Hong-Kong bitcoin exchange that was hacked this week may distribute the losses among all of its users, according to a Bloomberg blog post today. Hackers stole about $68 million worth of bitcoin from the exchange, Bitfinex.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan of Bloomberg Gadfly about the hack.

A 21-year-old father and his 4-year-old son were shot at in their car in Phoenix and police say its the latest attack by a serial killer who has killed seven people.

The boy and his father were not injured in the attack, which took place last month. Police also say that there was no apparent motive. The attacks have been happening since March, many of them in the low-income neighborhood of Maryvale.

Denis Cuspert, the German-born former rapper known as Deso Dogg and an ISIS recruiter, was declared dead by U.S. officials after an airstrike in October. The claim was disputed and after a profile of Cuspert in The Fader last month, the Pentagon reversed its statement, saying the jihadist survived.

Cuspert’s story offers a window into the work and effect of extremist propaganda, as well as the rise of foreign fighters traveling to Syria.

Although the world’s attention is on the Olympics, there’s plenty going on in the sports world at home.

Baseball’s trading deadline was this week. Some big players got traded, some troublesome ones didn’t. The college football pre-season coaches poll is out. And, Nike is shedding much of its golf gear.

Here & Now‘s Eric Westervelt talks with Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca.

The Rolling Stones ended their 1969 U.S. tour with a free concert at the old Altamont Speedway in northern California. It was supposed to be a celebration, but it turned into chaos.

A young fan was stabbed to death, allegedly by a member of the Hells Angels, right in front of the stage as the Stones performed. The killing was captured on film because a documentary crew was making the film called “Gimmie Shelter.”

The highway can be a lonely place for truck drivers, who often travel long distances for days and weeks without seeing family and friends. But an organization called Truckstop Ministries offers a sanctuary for tired drivers to reflect, rest and pray.

Saul Gonzalez of Here & Now contributor KCRW in Los Angeles paid a visit to a truck stop church off Interstate 10 in southern California and has our story.

Frank Shorter won the Olympic Marathon in Munich in 1972, and four years later added a silver medal to that gold when he finished second in the marathon at the games in Montreal.

He later helped establish the first anti-doping agency in the U.S. and served as a spokesman against athletes using performance enhancing drugs. But his public persona hid a dark secret: the years of abuse he and his siblings suffered at the hands of their father, Dr. Samuel Shorter.

A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the last woolly mammoths died out because they didn’t have enough water to drink. That happened about 6,000 years ago, on St. Paul Island off the coast of Alaska.

Russell Graham, a professor in Penn State’s Department of Geosciences, joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the new finding.

Two weeks of party conventions and back-to-back speeches meant to revel in political ideals also highlighted something else: language.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic writes that unlike past political cycles, current Republicans and Democrats speak with different sets of vocabulary, even as they discuss the same policy issues.

Shawn Johnson was the sprightly 16-year-old gymnast who charmed the country at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, winning a gold on the balance beam, and silver medals for the team, all-around and floor exercise competitions.

For a teenager from Des Moines, Iowa, it sounds like a dream true. But those first years at home after the Games weren’t easy. Johnson struggled with the constant spotlight, and, for a time, with an eating disorder.

The Divine Lorraine Hotel is one of Philadelphia’s most prominent examples of blight.

The late Victorian complex was built in 1894 as a stylish set of apartments. When it changed hands 54 years later, it became the first racially integrated hotel in the city and a symbol of pride and luxury.

The four-day Democratic National Convention put Philadelphia in the spotlight. The world learned of its historic roots, the Liberty Bell, and the city’s food. But what visitors may not have seen are the neighborhoods that make Philadelphia the largest city with the most deep poverty in the country.

Aaron Moselle of Here & Now contributor WHYY explains how it happened.

Pope Francis’s visit to Poland this week celebrates the country’s rich Catholic heritage, but it also highlights tensions with the Polish Catholic culture and the current right-wing government’s anti-immigrant stance.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with historian Piotr H. Kosicki, a University of Maryland professor and a former scholar at the Wilson Center, about Poland’s evolving relationship with Europe and the world.

Farmers are watching the election closely, looking at issues like immigration which could affect farm labor. Today, a look at the dangers of farming.

According to the International Labor Organization, nearly half of the 335,000 workplace fatalities around the world every year take place in agriculture settings.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with David Griffiths and his wife Edie, founders of Seven Stars Farm Organic Yogurt, about the hay bale accident that left him quadriplegic.

Prosecutors dropped the remaining charges against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. The move comes after three other officers were not convicted.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent, about the case.

Guest

Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent. She tweets @jenniferludden.

There was one shooting every six hours on average last year in Philadelphia. In the past 10 years, more than 14,500 shootings occurred, with at least 2,600 killed by guns — many of whom were black residents.

While some see the numbers as a reason to increase gun control, others see things differently.

Yuri Zalzman of North Philadelphia’s The Gun Range and Maj Toure of the activist group Black Guns Matter have come together to try to find solutions.

Donald Trump ended his speech at the Republican National Convention last night with the phrase that has become the central one of his campaign: “Make America great again.”

When people use that phrase, what era are they referring to? Here & Now producer Chris Ballman asked Republican delegates that question outside the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

When you hear “make America great again,” what era comes to mind? Let us know with a comment below.

It’s been a big week for Cleveland with the Republican National Convention, but the city is used to royalty — rock royalty. The phrase “rock ‘n’ roll” is said to have originated here, from local DJ Alan Freed.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young went to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and spoke with visitors and Meredith Rutledge-Borger, the museum’s associate curator, about Cleveland’s music history.

A manhunt was underway Friday for a shooter or shooters who opened fire at a shopping mall in Munich, killing and wounding several people, a Munich police spokeswoman said.

Munich police spokeswoman Claudia Kuenzel told The Associated Press there had been “several dead and wounded” in the shooting at Olympia Einkaufszentrum mall. She could not provide exact numbers.

“The shooter or shooters are still on the run” either in or around the mall, she said.

The Bavarian Interior Ministry confirmed at least one dead and multiple people hurt.

The toilets, sewage systems and waste that a civilization leaves behind can tell researchers a lot about how that civilization lived.

Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow, who teaches at Brandies University, has studied the toilets and sewage systems of ancient Rome. She speaks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about her research.

Interview Highlights: Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow

On the changing understanding of Roman toilets

Clevelanders used to cringe every time someone mentioned that the polluted Cuyahoga River caught fire in June 1969. But a new generation is embracing the “Burning River” name.

Elizabeth Miller from Here & Now contributor WCPN in Cleveland reports.

Read more on this story via WCPN Ideastream.

Two of the biggest beer companies in the world are getting closer to merging. Belgian-based Anheuser-Busch InBev received clearance from the United States Justice Department to take over London-based SABMiller, as long as it meets some specific conditions.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about the merger.

Read more on this story via the Harvard Business Review.

The Republican National Convention has received plenty of media coverage, but what has the experience been like for convention delegates?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young met with delegates from New Jersey, Tennessee and California to get their views on how this unpredictable convention has gone.

Hear more of Here & Now‘s coverage from the Republican National Convention.

Follow the Here & Now election road trip on Tumblr.

Silicon Valley’s high tech giants and starts ups have drawn hundreds of thousands of South Asians to the San Francisco Bay Area in recent years. The influx has led to an explosion of Indian arts, especially music and dance.

Rachael Myrow of Here & Now contributing station KQED explores the growing scene.

Read more on this story via KQED.

There’s been a lot of controversy about parts of Melania Trump’s speech that mirrored Michelle Obama’s address to the Democratic Convention eight years ago. But how much did that matter to the delegates at the convention?

Here & Now host Robin Young talks with Fulton County, Georgia County Commissioner and GOP delegate Liz Haussman about Trump’s keynote address and what’s resonating with the delegates.

Interview Highlights: Liz Haussman

On claims of plagiarism in Melania’s speech:

A new study has found that, in some parts of Cleveland, people live 12 years less on average than people less than 10 miles away.
Here & Now’s Robin Young visited a neighborhood clinic to see some of the health issues hitting poorer neighborhoods. She spoke with patient Molly Hileman and Dr.

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