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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Are Women's Colleges Still Relevant?

(sbc.edu)

Sweet Briar College, a small women’s school in Virginia, announced last week that it will close in August. Students, faculty, staff and alumnae were caught by surprise. The college’s president, James Jones, announced that enrollment was down and the college couldn’t cover its expenses.

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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Union Reign On Kentucky Coal Comes To An End

A coal miner in Jenkins, KY, pictured in 1935. (Library of Congress)

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:28 pm

For the first time in about a century, there are no working union coal miners in Kentucky. The state’s few remaining union coal miners were laid off New Years Eve when Patriot Coal’s Highland Mine in Western Kentucky shut down.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Erica Peterson of WFPL reports that the union is struggling to appeal to younger coal miners, but others feel organized labor still has a role to play.

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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Obama And Unions Clash On Trade Deal

This week, labor leaders let President Obama know that when it comes to foreign trade, they are living on opposite sides of the tracks – the fast track, that is. That’s a term people use for giving a president the power to negotiate a trade agreement, and then put the final package on a “fast track” through Congress.

Lawmakers can give it a yes-or-no vote, but can’t amend the deal. Presidents have been using this power for decades, but only because Congress has regularly renewed it. Now the authority has expired, which is making it tough for Obama to wrap up an Asian trade deal.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

What The 'Blurred Lines' Verdict Means For The Music Industry

Musicians Robin Thicke (left) and Pharrell Williams perform onstage during the 2013 BET Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on June 30, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for BET)

On Tuesday, a California federal jury delivered its verdict after eight days of trial testimony examining whether Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams’ song “Blurred Lines” infringed on the copyright for Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit “Got to Give It Up.”

The Gaye estate walked away with a victory and Thicke and Williams were ordered to pay more than $7 million in damages, plus profits attributable to infringement. It is a sad day for the “Blurred Lines” duo, but what could the ruling mean for the music industry?

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Get Injured Often? It Could Be In Your Genes.

(Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images)

Are you one of those people who constantly ends up on crutches? Friends say you should be covered in bubble wrap? Well it could be that it’s not your fault. In fact, it could be your genes.

A new review article published in the Journal of Sports Medicine concludes that genetics play a key role in a person’s risk of suffering from sports injuries. That holds true for athletes of all ages and all abilities, from weekend warriors to Olympians.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Why A Strong Dollar Sent Markets Plummeting

(401(K) 2012/Flickr)

U.S. stock indexes opened a little higher Wednesday, after taking a tumble the day before. The Dow and S & P 500 both fell by close to 2 percent. The moves come as the U.S. dollar continues to make gains against the euro and other currencies. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at what’s happening with Maggie Lake of CNN.

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What Shapes Health
1:54 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Are American Workplace Policies Stuck In The 1950s?

Many more women have joined the workforce, but policies haven’t caught up – and that's affecting public health. (wackystuff/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 12:30 pm

People in the United States have shorter lifespans than in almost any other industrialized country in the world, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Lisa Berkman set out to find out why and what can be done about it. She's a professor of epidemiology and public policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Kurds Launch New Offensive Against ISIS

Kurdish Peshmerga security forces stand guard on the outskirts of the northern city of Mosul, Iraq on June 14, 2014. (AP)

Kurdish Peshmerga forces are attacking ISIS in the oil-rich Iraqi province of Kirkuk. The offensive started yesterday and comes as Iraqi forces and Shiite militias try to retake Tikrit from the militants.

The two assaults are taking places as the Senate Foreign Relations Committee gets ready to consider President Obama’s request for authorization to use military force against ISIS for three more years.

U.S. fighter jets have been conducting airstrikes against ISIS targets for several months.

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Clinton Says She Should Have Used Government Email

Breaking her silence, Hillary Rodham Clinton conceded Tuesday that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of “convenience.”

“At the time, this didn’t seem like an issue,” Clinton said in her first public comments since it was disclosed last week that she exclusively used her private email for government business and housed her communications on a personal server.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Getting Mental Health Help In High School

A poster at Rainier Beach High School's teen clinic lets students know they have a safe place to talk. (Ruby de Luna/KUOW)

It used to be that students went to their school nurse to have their sore throat checked, or to get a vaccine.

But many kids have needs that go beyond physical health, whether it’s dealing with exposure to violence, or having suicidal thoughts.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Ruby de Luna reports that a growing number of schools in Seattle have started offering mental health services in response.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

These Parents Say Kids Need Freedom. The Law Doesn't Agree.

From left, Danielle, Dvora, Rafi, and Alexander Meitiv are a family that rose to the national spotlight after Child Protective Services accused Danielle and Alexander of neglect for letting their children walk home from the local playground alone. (Courtesy of Danielle Meitiv)

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 11:41 am

Danielle and Alexander Meitiv believe that the best way to raise children is to give them the freedom to play, walk and explore without parental supervision.

That philosophy got them in trouble when police picked up their two children – Rafi, age 10, and Dvora, age 6 – when they saw the kids walking home from a park one mile from their house in Silver Spring, Maryland.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Agencies To Overhaul How They Report Credit Scores

Equifax, Experian and TransUnion, the three biggest companies that collect and disseminate credit information, have agreed to change the way they report credit scores under an agreement being announced Monday.

The changes will take effect over the next three years or so and will impact how the industry handles reporting errors and how they list unpaid medical bills.

Credit scores can determine whether people can rent apartments, get home or car insurance or in some cases find a job.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

'Mockingjay' Director: 'I Love The Book. We Made This For The Fans.'

Director Francis Lawrence attends the premiere of Lionsgate’s ‘The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1′ on November 17, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

The highest grossing movie of 2014, “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1,” comes out on DVD and Blu-ray today. We revisit Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson’s November conversation with director Francis Lawrence about the rewards and challenges of bringing such beloved books to the screen. Lawrence also directed two other films in the series: “Catching Fire” and “Mockingjay – Part 2.”

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

Are The Spurs Leading The Way On Sports Analytics?

Tim Duncan #21 of the San Antonio Spurs dunks past Matt Barnes #22 of the Los Angeles Clippers during a 119115 Clipper win at Staples Center on February 19, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and condition of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Harry How/Getty Images)

The San Antonio Spurs take on the Denver Nuggets tonight in the Alamo City, Texas. The Spurs have won five NBA Championships in the past 16 years.

But it’s another award the team just picked up that we want to focus on. The M.I.T. Sloan Sports Analytics Conference named the Spurs the “Best Analytics Organization” and gave team manager R.C. Buford a lifetime achievement award.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

Rare Doubloon Wows Collectors At National Money Show

This rare Brasher Dubloon was minted in the United States in 1787. (Courtesy of American Numismatic Association)

Rare coin enthusiasts are gathered in Portland, Oregon for the National Money Show, a celebration of rare coins and bills.

Over $100 million worth of coins are expected to be displayed by dealers and collectors alike, but attendees expect the focus of the event to be the fabled Brasher Doubloon.

Struck in 1787, the Brasher Doubloons were the first gold coins ever struck for the United States and the first coins ever valued at $10 million.

The doubloon will take center stage in a convention full of historical curiosities and wild manufacturing errors.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Kentucky Driver Stranded 19 Hours With No End In Sight

Seth Slifer tweeted this photo with the note, "It's been 15 hours now and we haven't moved. It's a wonderful start to my vacation, and I should've brought a buddy." (Seth Slifer/Twitter)

In Kentucky, hundreds of people have been stranded in their cars and trucks since last night because of a storm that dumped over 20 inches in parts of the state. The stranded drivers are primarily on I-65 and I-24.

Seth Slifer from Franklyn, Tenn., is among those stranded on I-65. He spoke with Here & Now’s Robin Young by cellphone about the scene and how he’s holding up.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

4 Recipes For Beet Lovers

(chrisandjenni/Flickr)

Growing up, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst hated beets. But now she’s become a beet convert, using them in salads and even beet hummus. Kathy shares recipes for her favorite beet dishes with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Philadelphia Police Commissioner On Policing And Ferguson

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey (right) listens while U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement to the press, after meeting with members of his Task Force on 21st Century Policing, March 2, 2015 in Washington, D.C. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

After months of anticipation, the United States Justice Department has released a scathing report on the Ferguson Police Department, following the death last year of a young unarmed black man by a white police officer.

The report comes just a few days after the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing presented guidelines for law enforcement across the country.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Mobile Gaming Prepares To Overtake Traditional Video Games

Mobile phone app designer Fung Kam-keung, CEO and founder of Awesapp Limited, plays on a smartphone with one of his latest app game called 'Yellow Umbrella' at the Awesapp Limited office in Hong Kong on October 23, 2014. (Nicholas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 1:49 pm

Mobile games – the apps you download onto your phone or tablet – used to be a bit of an afterthought in the gaming industry, behind the bigger console and computer markets.

But mobile games are growing fast, and are reaching millions of users who don’t consider themselves gamers.

The mobile gaming industry held its annual awards dinner last night, and the game Monument Valley took the Grand Prix.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

70 Years After Hitler's Death, Germany To Republish 'Mein Kampf'

One of two rare copies of "Mein Kampf," signed by the young Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and due for auction, are pictured in Los Angeles, California on February 25, 2014. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Adolf Hitler’s manifesto “Mein Kampf” is a rambling, hate-filled, disjointed and sometimes unintelligible blueprint for the Third Reich. When a new annotated edition of the book is published in Germany in January 2016, it will mark the first time in almost 70 years that the text will be found in German bookstores.

After the war, the occupying allies banned the book, and the rights passed to Hitler’s home state of Bavaria. But the copyright expires at the end of the year, and all 16 German states have agreed that the book can be re-released, as long as it contains annotations.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Smarter Robots In The Works

CoBot, short for Collaborative Robot, is designed to be an office helper. The bots, made by a team at Carnegie Mellon University led by professor Manuela Veloso, can navigate around a building on their own. They are also smart enough to know when to ask humans for help, such as to press buttons and open doors. (cs.cmu.edu)

Having robot office helpers could be pretty handy. But today’s machines are nowhere close to the smart, free-roaming robots you see in movies. Right now, robots couldn’t get around a building without tripping on chairs or getting stuck behind doors.

From Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, Prachi Patel reports on a new bot that will work better in human environments.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

What Makes Or Breaks A TV Remake?

David Tenant (right) and Olivia Colman (left) star in the popular drama 'Broadchurch.' (Broadchurch/Facebook)

British television’s crime drama “Broadchurch,” about a young boy’s murder in a seaside town, has been an absolute success, and returns tomorrow for a second season.

Meanwhile, the American remake of the same show, “Gracepoint” was a flop and Fox canceled it after just one season.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Speeding Up The Game Of Baseball

Juan Perez #2, Gregor Blanco #7 and Hunter Pence #8 of the San Francisco Giants celebrate after defeating the Washington Nationals on October 4, 2014. The game was the longest of the 2014 season, ending in the 18 innings. (Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

Major League Baseball’s spring training games are underway in Florida and Arizona – and clocks are ticking. After last season’s average game lasted a record 3 hours and 2 minutes, the push is on to speed things up.

Doug Tribou of NPR’s Only A Game joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to explain how the league plans to do that, and how the players are reacting.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Supreme Court To Hear Challenge To Health Care Subsidies

Oral arguments begin tomorrow in a closely watched Supreme Court case that could dismantle the Affordable Care Act and eliminate health insurance for more than eight million Americans. (Susan Walsh/AP)

Oral arguments begin tomorrow in a closely watched Supreme Court case that could dismantle the Affordable Care Act and eliminate health insurance for more than eight million Americans.

The case centers on one phrase in the law – “established by the State.”

The four plaintiffs in King V. Burwell, funded by conservative groups including Competitive Enterprise Institute, argue that “the State” refers solely to the 16 states that have set up their own exchanges, not the federal government, which established exchanges in 34 states.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Iraq Launches Offensive Against ISIS

This image posted on a militant website on Saturday, June 14, 2014, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, appears to show militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant leading away captured Iraqi soldiers dressed in plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq. (AP Photo via militant website)

Backed by allied Shiite and Sunni fighters, Iraqi security forces today began a large-scale military operation to recapture Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit from the extremist group that calls itself the Islamic State.

The offensive is seen as a major step in a campaign to reclaim a large swath of territory in northern Iraq controlled by ISIS.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Revisiting The Pre-WWII Chinese Nightclubs With Author Lisa See

A promotional playbill from the Forbidden City nightclub, which was in business from the late 1930s to the late 1950s. (Wikimedia Commons)

Last year, Chinese American author Lisa See spoke with us about her latest book, “China Dolls.” The book tells the story of popular Chinese nightclubs in San Francisco in the late 1930s.

With the release of the paperback edition of the novel this week, we revisit Here & Now host Robin Young’s conversation with Lisa See.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Warren Buffett's Letter To Shareholders Only Hints At Successor

Billionaire investor Warren Buffett speaks at an event called, "Detroit Homecoming" September 18, 2014 in Detroit, Michigan. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

There’s long been speculation about who will take the reins as CEO of Berkshire Hathaway when Warren Buffett steps down.

This weekend, that speculation continued as Buffett repeated that he had identified his successor. His vice chair Charlie Munger, in a separate letter, named two Berkshire employees – Ajit Jain and Greg Abel – as among those likely to get the job.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

After Red Carpet Controversy, A Look At The History Of Dreadlocks

Actress Zendaya attends the 87th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 22, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

On Sunday’s glamorous Academy Awards red carpet, Disney star Zendaya Coleman decided to shake things up and wear dreadlocks extensions with her Oscar gown.

The following day when the E! network’s Fashion Police aired, the show’s co-host Giuliana Rancic commented that the 18-year-old woman looked like she smelled of “patchouli oil” or “weed.”

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NPR Story
12:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Young Singers Beat The Odds To Sing With National Honor Choir

Fifth graders (from left) Claire Thompson, Sophia Porreca and Tamilyn Lechuga all attend Kunsmiller Creative Arts Academy. (Courtesy Denver Public Schools)

Tonight and tomorrow, 1,200 students from across the country will perform with the National Children’s Honor Choir in Salt Lake City.

It’s one of the most prestigious junior choruses in the country. Among them will be three students from a school in southwest Denver, where more than three-quarters of the kids qualify for free or reduced lunch.

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NPR Story
12:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

'Star Trek' Star Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

Actor Leonard Nimoy arrives at the premiere of Paramount Pictures' 'Star Trek Into Darkness' at the Dolby Theatre on May 14, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 1:36 pm

Leonard Nimoy, known around the world as Spock on “Star Trek,” died this morning at age 83. Nimoy, of course, was more than just Spock. He was a poet, a photographer and a musician. But he touched a chord as the brainy, unflappably logical, half-human half-Vulcan Spock.

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