Here & Now

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NPR's midday news magazine.  

Health experts have warned about the growing risks people face as bacteria increasingly become resistant to antibiotics.

A team led by Professor Roy Kishony of Harvard Medical School and Technion Israel Institute of Technology found a way to show just how quickly bacteria can evolve to be resistant, and their video has gone viral.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with postdoctoral fellow Michael Baym about how he made the video, and what the team hopes to accomplish with its research.

The Chinese and Russian navies are conducting military exercises in the South China Sea, which has been the subject of territorial disputes between China and its Southeast Asian neighbors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Stephen Nagy of the International Christian University of Tokyo about whether they are risking a provocation.

Interview Highlights: Stephen Nagy

On what the exercises are about

Award-winning shows like “Game of Thrones” and “Veep” will be well represented at Sunday’s Emmy Awards, but some new names may collect statuettes.

“The Americans’” Keri Russell is looking for her first Emmy, as is veteran actor Courtney B. Vance, who gave a strong performance as Johnny Cochran in “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson.” ABC’s “Black-ish” may also finally get recognized as a top comedy this year, though in an election year, Emmy voters may continue to award another solid season of “Veep.”

The top four Paralympic runners competing in the 1,500-meter final on Sunday beat the final time posted by Olympic gold medalist Matt Centrowitz Jr. at the Rio Games less than a month ago. The visually impaired runners did not use assisted technologies or guides.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Erin Strout of Runner’s World magazine about the record-breaking runners, and other standout Paralympic performances.

Managers have many reasons to say “no” to employees, but it can be difficult to work for someone who always says “no” to new ideas.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with author and employee engagement expert David Sturt about why saying “yes” more often might be better for business.

Don’t trust the polls. Trust the average. That’s the general advice from most pollsters or politicos when reading presidential predictions.

But even so, not all polls are created equal.

Results differ based on who is being selected for a poll, whether it is a national or state poll, the number of candidates on the ballot and how close the poll is to the election.

What Does The Electoral College Do?

Sep 13, 2016

Voters go to the polls on Nov. 8. But the 538 members of the Electoral College vote on Dec. 19.

They’re supposed to follow the popular vote, but there’s always a chance a few might not. And what happens if Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are tied?

Political scientist Kyle Dell joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young for a refresher on the Electoral College, and how members of Congress might break a potential tie.

Interview Highlights: Kyle Dell

On the Electoral College’s function

The world’s wilderness areas have experienced catastrophic losses in the past two decades, according to a new study published Friday in the journal “Current Biology.”

Comparing current maps with those from the 1990s, researchers concluded that more than 3.3 million square kilometers, or about one-tenth of the world’s total wilderness, has been lost, raising deep concerns about what effect that has on local economies and global climate change.

Stock markets in the U.S. were steady this morning, after closing at their lowest level since July on Friday.

The drop came after comments from Eric Rosengren, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston president, raising the expectations for a rate hike from the Federal Reserve later this year.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Jill Schlesinger about what is rattling investors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English about some of the stories that are gathering steam on social media.

Jury selection began this week in the federal trial of two former top aides to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who are said to have orchestrated the traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge in 2013 known as “Bridgegate.”

Bridget Anne Kelly, Christie’s former deputy chief of staff, and Bill Baroni, a Christie appointee to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, are charged with fraud and conspiracy for allegedly planning the lane closures as an act of retribution against Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich, for not endorsing Christie’s bid for re-election.

Last night’s prime-time presidential forum was the first time Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were set to speak on the same stage. But talk afterward focused more on the shortcomings of the forum’s host, the “Today” show’s Matt Lauer.

NPR’s David Folkenflik examines what Lauer did and didn’t do last night, and how the moderators of the upcoming debates can take tips from his performance.

Apple’s iPhone is getting an updated home button and will come with water and dust protection.

Apple says the iPhone 7 is now force sensitive, so responses can differ based on how hard you press it. It’s similar to what Apple has done with a trackpad in a slimmer MacBook model last year.

Camera improvements include a new flash with four rather than two shades of color to match ambient light.

It’s one of several new features Apple is introducing at an event in San Francisco.

Presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will address the fight against ISIS, national security and veterans issues in New York tonight.

The Commander-in-Chief Forum will be simulcast by NBC and MSNBC and will feature questions from members of the military, veterans and military family members. It’s sponsored by Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young previews the event with NPR’s Phil Ewing.

The ITT Technical Institute, the nation’s fifth largest for-profit college, announced today that it is closing all its campuses, and laying off nearly 8,000 employees. ITT’s parent company blamed sanctions from the federal government for the closure.

Last month, the Department of Education banned the school from enrolling students who receive federal financial aid, which comprises a large portion of the school’s revenue.

The Range 12 wildfire in Washington State began July 30 and burned for days, blackening 176,600 acres of valuable habitat on the Hanford Reach National Monument. The land was set aside in 2000 by President Bill Clinton, and it’s home to desert species including the Greater Sage-Grouse, sagebrush sparrows and tiny burrowing owls.

Anna King of Here & Now contributor Northwest News Network took a look at what was lost — and what remains.

Thousands of protesters have descended on a quiet part of North Dakota, occasionally clashing with security personnel over plans to build an oil pipeline under the Missouri River.

Lawsuits are pitting Native American tribes and environmental activists against the Energy Transfer Partners pipeline company.

Amy Sisk, a reporter with Inside Energy, discusses the latest with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are preparing for what’s being billed as the marquee moment of the long campaign season: the first presidential debate, which will take place on September 26 in New York.

Trump spent Saturday visiting a black church in Detroit. The move was aimed less at trying to win over the black vote, but instead at cooling claims that he’s insensitive to minorities.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest news from the campaign trail with NPR’s Ron Elving.

This summer has been tough, with record heat, drought, floods and wildfires across much of the country. But in 1816, it wasn’t hot weather people endured. It was bitter cold.

The year came to be known as the “Year Without a Summer.” There was frost and snow all summer long, and it may have been a first taste of how a changing climate can affect peoples’ lives.

Former Stanford student Brock Turner was released from jail Friday.

Turner served three months of a six month sentence for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman in January 2015. The case set off a national outcry, with many arguing that the six month sentence was too lenient.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets an update from KQED’s Beth Willon.

Hurricane Hermine made landfall in Florida overnight, before it was downgraded to tropical storm status.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Hermine may be responsible for claiming the life of a man who died after he was hit by a tree. Forecasters say the storm most likely will cause flooding in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states.

The film “The Light Between Oceans” opens tomorrow. The film is based on the best-selling novel by M.L. Stedman. Derek Cianfrance adapted the novel for screen and directed the movie, in which Michael Fassbender stars.


When it comes to the future of medicine, few therapies get people as excited as stem cells.

Researchers are looking at them for future treatment for diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Type 1 Diabetes and more. But the key word is “future.” Progress with stem cell therapies has been slow and the few clinical trials taking place are in their infancy.

Yet despite the lack of FDA-approved treatments, stem cell clinics — which promise cures for conditions as varied as arthritis, pulmonary disorders and orthopedics — are popping up all over the country.

Mexicans by and large have been excoriating their president for inviting Donald Trump for what looked like a state visit yesterday.

Journalist Esteban Illades of the Mexican news site Nexos called it “the most painful day in the history of the Mexican presidency.” Illades joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with more about how the country is reacting to Trump’s trip.

The great comic actor Gene Wilder died Monday at age 83 from Alzheimer’s disease.

Known for his roles in such films as “Young Frankenstein,” “Blazing Saddles” and “Willie Wonka And The Chocolate Factory,” Wilder’s performances delighted audiences for decades.

Here & Now pays tribute by revisiting host Robin Young’s 2005 interview with Wilder about his then-new memoir, “Kiss Me Like a Stranger.”

Here’s the raw audio from their interview:


The worst bus stop in America is a small patch of concrete at the intersection of Route 29 and Crestmoor Drive in Silver Spring, Maryland.

That’s, at least, according to the transit website Streetsblog USA, which held a bracket contest to find the country’s sorriest bus stops.

Common, the hip-hop artist from Chicago, has been on the rap scene since the early-1990s. He branched into acting in the 2000s, and he recently started the Common Ground Foundation, a non-profit that aims to empower underprivileged young pepole through creative arts, mentoring, and educational opportunities.

He’s also working with Allstate on a scholarship program for students at historically black colleges.

The White House announced today that President Barack Obama will expand the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument off the coast of Hawaii, creating the world’s largest marine protected area.

The move quadruples the size of the monument from 50 miles to 200 miles. But it’s caused some controversy in Hawaii.

The University of Virginia is facing criticism for raising the cost of tuition for students over the last few years while at the same time, setting aside more than $2 billion in an investment fund.

Many major universities have these funds, but UVA’s is among the biggest for a public school. Today, the state legislature’s subcommittee on higher education will question top university officials about the fund, including President Teresa Sullivan.

Here are some of Sullivan’s remarks from her appearance before a Friday joint meeting of the Virginia State Legislature:

Across the country, the death penalty is on the decline.

Twenty states and the District of Columbia have abolished it, and four others have issued a moratorium on executions. Last year, 50 people were sentenced to death, less than half the number six years ago. But the majority of those sentences were handed down in just 16 counties, out of 3,000 counties in the United States.