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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Using Cockroach Legs For Prosthetics Research

Lego figures prepare to battle with cockroach legs. (Screenshot)

All big ideas start somewhere. With that in mind, undergraduate engineers at the University of Pennsylvania are starting with cockroaches.

They’re experimenting with different ways to control the insect’s legs after they’ve been amputated. Think voice commands and brain waves.

It’s the type of technology shaping the next generation of human prostheses, and the assignment gives students the chance to channel their inner Dr. Frankenstein.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

DJ Session: African-American Classical Musicians

Jason Moran performs at the Souillac en Jazz Festival in France in 2008. Moran currently serves as artistic director for jazz at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. (mpix46/Flickr)

For this week’s installment of DJ Sessions, on Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Terrance McKnight, a DJ at WQXR, New York’s Classical Music Radio Station. He shares pieces by African-American musicians and composers who are making an impact in classical music.

Songs In This Segment

Jeff Scott, “Startin Sumthin”

Jeff Scott, “The Gift of Life”

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

NBA Finals Head Back To Cleveland

LeBron James #23 of the Cleveland Cavaliers rebounds against the Golden State Warriors in the first half during Game Two of the 2015 NBA Finals at ORACLE Arena on June 7, 2015 in Oakland, California. (Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

The NBA Finals are tied at one game apiece, as the Golden State Warriors head back to Ohio to face the Cleveland Cavaliers for game three.

NPR’s Tom Goldman talks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about Lebron James’ legacy, Golden State’s newfound offensive vulnerability and a new nickname for the home team.

[Youtube]

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

100-Year-Old Lessons Discovered On Chalkboards At Oklahoma School

The aged boards show a countdown to Christmas in 1917. (Oklahoma City Public Schools)

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 3:52 am

At an Oklahoma City high school last week, what started out as a routine job for contractors – switching out chalkboards for whiteboards – unearthed some incredible pieces of history: hidden chalkboards with lessons from 1917 almost perfectly preserved.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Sherry Read, a math teacher at Emerson High School, where the chalkboards were discovered.

Interview Highlights: Sherry Read

On her reaction to seeing the chalkboards

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NPR Story
12:15 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Problems With Seafood Go Beyond Overfishing, Says 'American Catch' Author

Clerks prepare the fish selling department at Whole Foods Market in New York City. (Stephen Chernin/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 1:25 pm

Issues of overfishing and the depletion of fish stocks are often in the news, but according to author Paul Greenberg, consumers should be also be concerned with where the fish is coming from.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Apple's New Music Service Joins The Streaming Scene

Apple logos adorn the exterior of the Moscone West building on the first day of the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, Monday, June 8, 2015. The maker of iPods and iPhones is expected to announce its new, paid streaming-music service to launch this summer. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 1:28 pm

Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference is being held today in San Francisco, and a new music-streaming service is expected to be a major focus.

Derek Thompson, senior editor of The Atlantic, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss Apple’s new service and how streaming has changed the music industry.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Recipes For A Summer Picnic

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes for foods that can go on the patio, in the park or on the beach. (sophieh/Flickr)

Now that the summer weather has arrived, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst wants to eat outdoors! She joins host Robin Young with recipes for foods that can go on the patio, in the park or on the beach. They include:

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Switch-Pitcher Makes It To The Major League Mound

Pat Venditte of the Oakland Athletics throws in the eighth inning against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on June 7, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. ( Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Pat Venditte has the rare ability to pitch both left and right-handed. He even prompted a rule change in the professional rule book, requiring the pitcher declare which arm he plans to pitch with.

Last week, Venditte made his debut for his first professional major team – the Oakland Athletics. From Here & Now contributing station WPLN, Emil Moffatt reports on this ambidextrous pitcher’s journey to the major league mound.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Another Shot At The Triple Crown At The Belmont Stakes

Ahmed Zayat, owner of American Pharoah greets his horse after morning workouts prior to the 147th Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park on June 5, 2015 in Elmont, New York. (Al Bello/Getty Images)

The 147th Belmont Stakes are set to take place Saturday. Called “The Test of the Champion,” the high-pressure horse race is the final leg of the Triple Crown, coming after the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes.

All eyes are on American Pharoah, the horse that has a shot at becoming the 12th in history to sweep the three races. It would be the first sweep since the horse Affirmed did it in 1978.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

San Diego Is A Military Town

The USS Midway sits in San Diego Harbor in San Diego, California. The ship was decomissioned after Operation Desert Storm in the 1990s, and now serves as a floating museum. (Al_HikesAZ/Flickr)

Between the Navy and the Marines, there are around 80,000 military personnel in San Diego Country. The Department of Defense pumps billions of dollars into the area’s economy every year. Here & Now‘s Alex Ashlock looks at the connection between the city of San Diego and the military.

On a recent morning, the U.S. Navy’s past and present came together on the waters of San Diego Harbor.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Solar Gardens Grow Community Energy

Boulder's community solar garden, run by Clean Energy Collective, has the capacity to produce just under 1 megawatt of energy. (Grace Hood/CPR News)

A growing number of homeowners across the country are looking to get their electricity from solar energy, as the cost to install panels goes down.

But not everyone can put panels on their homes. Maybe it’s too shady, or the roof slope isn’t quite right. That’s where community solar comes in.

Grace Hood, an energy and environment reporter for Here & Now contributor station Colorado Public Radio, explains what it is and how it works.

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NPR Story
12:56 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

FIFA Sponsors Applaud Sepp Blatter's Resignation

A day after announcing his resignation, Sepp Blatter was back at FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland today, he spoke with staff and the AP reports that he got a standing ovation.

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NPR Story
12:34 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

DJ Sessions: What Outer Space Might Sound Like

Italian DJ and producer Daniele Baldelli is known for his "cosmic disco" style. (Facebook)

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 12:01 pm

For this week’s DJ Session we sit down with KCRW‘s Mario Cotto, who shares a number of picks that sound very spacey, including a song by DJ Daniele Baldelli, who is known for his contributions to the “Afro Cosmic” music genre.

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NPR Story
12:34 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

Forming A Community Of Conservation In San Diego

Transition Streets San Diego members Gawain Thompson, and Leslie and Jamie Edmonds stand in front of the Edmonds' home in El Cerrito, California. (Robin Young/Here & Now)

Building on a model from a U.K. organization, a group of people in San Diego has come together to help each other build a more conservation-minded, sustainable lifestyle.

It’s a response to the drought, of course, but Transition Streets San Diego is also focused on energy, transportation, food and waste.

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NPR Story
12:23 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

Inside America's Secret Network Of Space Planes, Satellites

A ULA Atlas V rocket lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Wednesday, May 20, 2015. The rocket is carrying the X-37B space plane for the U.S. Air Force as well as 10 CubeSats and the Planetary Society's LightSail Mission. (United Launch Alliance/AP)

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 12:53 pm

It has been two weeks since the U.S. Air Force launched its secret X-37B space plane, carried by an Atlas V rocket into orbit for its forth mission. Most of the details about the flight were classified, but some astronomers have been making an effort to track the plane and are speculating on what it is doing.

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NPR Story
1:31 pm
Tue June 2, 2015

The Challenges Of Unincorporated Cities

Both St. Louis and Baltimore are independent cities – they’re not incorporated into counties like most cities are. Those cities have struggled with some major problems in the past year.

Joseph Heathcott, professor of urban studies at The New School in New York City, joined Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to look at whether the fact that they’re independent cities is related to the problems.

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NPR Story
1:31 pm
Tue June 2, 2015

In 1915, San Diego Hired A Rainmaker And Floods Ensued

In California, rainmaker Charley Hatfield caused a flood in oldtown. (Courtesy of San Diego Public Library)

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 6:12 am

In the midst of California’s historic drought, the San Diego Library opened an exhibit that reminds us of the measures communities used to take to get the rain they needed.

In late 1915, San Diego hired a “moisture accelerator” named Charles Hatfield during a drought. He was said to have delivered on his promise to deliver enough rain to fill the empty reservoirs, but there was too much rain, causing a deadly flood.

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NPR Story
1:31 pm
Tue June 2, 2015

Transgender Bathroom Access At Work: New Federal Guidelines

The Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued new guidelines for businesses, saying transgender employees should have access to the restrooms that correspond to their gender identity, which may be different from their gender by birth.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Mon June 1, 2015

Supreme Court Weighs In On Facebook Threats, Religious Discrimination In Hiring

The Supreme Court this morning ruled in favor of a young Muslim woman after Abercrombie & Fitch refused to hire her for wearing a head scarf. The court also threw out the conviction of a Pennsylvania man, Anthony Elonis, who was prosecuted for making threats on Facebook.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Emily Bazelon, staff writer at New York Times Magazine and Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School, about the impact of these decisions.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Mon June 1, 2015

San Diego Water Cops On Patrol

In San Diego, the city sends inspectors out on the streets to look for violations. (Robin Young)

Amid the drought in California, public workers are being pressed into service to enforce water restrictions.

San Diego is urging residents to water their lawns and gardens no more than two days a week, for five minutes per watering station on a weekly schedule organized by home address.

The new state mandate aims to cut 25 percent overall, but every community is setting its own levels, and some have already implemented cuts.

In San Diego, the goal is a 16 percent reduction and the city has inspectors out on the streets to check violations.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Mon June 1, 2015

Consolidation In Computer Chip Industry: Intel Agrees To Buy Altera

Intel, headquartered in Santa Clara, California, agreed to buy Altera, which makes programmable chips, for $16.7 billion in cash. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Intel has agreed to buy Altera for $16.7 billion in cash. Intel is a powerhouse maker of processor chips, and is expected to use Altera, which makes programmable chips, to give it more strength in making chips for server systems.

The Altera chip technology has been increasingly popular as a way for companies to increase the speed of their servers, and by buying Altera, Intel will have more control of this market. The bid comes amid consolidation in the semiconductor industry.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

Cigar Smoking Championship Is A Marathon, Not A Sprint

(Darren Cioffi via Facebook)

Cigar smoking aficionados from around the world will descend on Copenhagen this weekend, for the next round of the Cigar Smoking World Championship.

Last year’s winner, Darren Cioffi, became the first American to win the world championship, and he also owns the Nashville cigar maker Principal Cigars. He talked about cigars and competitive smoking with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

What A Nuclear Arms Deal Will Mean For Iran

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif says he thinks a nuclear deal can be reached with the U.S. and other world powers by the June 30 deadline. This deal would freeze Iran’s nuclear program for a decade, and the sanctions against Iran would end.

But many are skeptical that this deal will actually work. Eliot Cohen, a professor of strategic studies at Johns Hopkins University, discusses the deal with Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

Commerce Department: U.S. Economy Contracted In First Quarter

Clothing is offered on sale at a department store in Manhattan on March 12, 2015 in New York City. For a third straight month in February U.S. retail sales unexpectedly fell according to a report by the Commerce Department released on Thursday. The report said that retail sales dropped 0.6 percent, with receipts falling in almost all categories. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The U.S. economy contracted in the first quarter of this year, according to new numbers from the Commerce Department, which reported that the U.S. GDP shrank at a 0.7 percent seasonally-adjusted annual rate in the first quarter.

Bad weather and a strong dollar that hurt U.S. exports are thought to be contributing factors. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Mike Regan of Bloomberg News about the report, and also about the latest on negotiations over Greece’s debt.

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NPR Story
12:34 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

A 'DREAMer' Goes To College

Barbara Olochea just graduated from Alhambra High School in Phoenix. (Courtesy)

It’s graduation time around the country, and many high school seniors are making plans to head off to college at the end of the summer.

Barbara Olachea, a recent graduate of Alhambra High School in Phoenix and the daughter of Mexican immigrants, tells us in her own words about how growing up in two cultures helped her prepare for the big move. Her story comes to us from Here & Now contributor KJZZ’s Spot 127 Youth Media Center in Phoenix.

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NPR Story
12:34 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Big Decisions Still To Come From U.S. Supreme Court

There are only a few weeks left for the U.S. Supreme Court to announce its decisions in some pretty hefty cases they heard this term. Same-sex marriage, healthcare reform and the death penalty are just a few of the issues the justices will weigh in on.

NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about impending Supreme Court decisions.

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NPR Story
12:34 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Summer TV Preview From NPR's Eric Deggans

It used to be that summer was a time for reruns on television, but networks are now taking summer television seriously, premiering new shows and limited series.

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins with recommendations on what to watch in the summer months.

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NPR Story
12:29 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

In India, Heat Kills As Monsoon Season Approaches

The front page of the Hindustan Times carried this photo of asphalt melting in Delhi. (Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times)

A heat wave in India has left over 1,100 people dead over the past month. In the capital New Delhi, 113 degree Fahrenheit temperatures have melted roadway crosswalks.

The sweltering heat will continue for at least another week when the annual monsoon rains begin. The BBC’s Delhi correspondent Zubair Ahmad joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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NPR Story
12:29 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Parched Rivers, Grasslands Choke California Wildlife

The giant kangaroo rat plays a big role in California’s ecosystem. (John Roser/University of California at Berkeley)

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 1:14 pm

Torrential rains this week in Texas have helped ease the drought in that state, but in California there is no relief in sight. Ranchers in San Luis Obispo County have sold off 75 percent of their cattle in the past four years. There’s not enough water or food to sustain them. And as Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd reports, in the wild, other animals important to the state’s economy and ecosystem are dying off.

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NPR Story
12:29 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Texas Lake Slowly Recovers From Drought

This photo taken by John Williams' daughter Tiffany Jowers shows the creek bottom, where the water is normally 20 to 25 feet deep. Right now, it's about 6 inches deep, but John says "we're glad it is flowing." (Tiffany Jowers)

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 2:07 pm

It continues to rain today in South Central Texas, which was hit hard by devastating flooding this week. The heavy rains have brought an end to the extreme drought there, which began in 2010.

In September 2013, John Williams, who owns Thunderbird Lodge and Resort on Lake Buchanan in Central Texas, spoke with Here & Now. The lake had shrunk to about one-third capacity.

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