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NPR Story
12:13 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

A Young Malcolm X, Through The Eyes Of His Daughter

American civil rights activist Malcolm X (1925 - 1965) speaks at a podium during a Black Muslim rally in Washington DC, circa 1963. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 4:33 pm

Ilyasah Shabazz is Malcolm X’s daughter and co-author of a new young adult novel based on her father’s teen years.

X: A Novel” focuses on when Malcolm X, then known as Malcolm Little, dropped out of school after the death of his father and started using drugs and breaking into houses.

That behavior eventually led to his imprisonment, which is where he came into contact with Islam.

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NPR Story
12:13 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Aging HIV-Positive Population Faces Challenges

Michael Hawkins, 56, contracted HIV when he was in his late 20s. He now joins a growing number of older Americans living with the virus. (Aundrea Murray, WNPR)

America is growing older, and so is its population of HIV-positive adults. This year, for the first time ever, half of Americans living with HIV are 50 years old and older.

For many of them, life presents a unique set of challenges. Among those challenges is increased social isolation.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Lydia Brown of WNPR reports.

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NPR Story
12:11 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Meet The New Top Dog Judge At Westminster

A Komondorok being groomed in the benching area at Pier 92 and 94 in New York City on the 2nd day of competition at the 139th Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show February 17, 2015. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 2:08 pm

The Westminster Kennel Club 139th Annual Dog Show concludes tonight with the much-anticipated anointing of the Best in Show dog.

Taking to the ring to judge that dog will be David Merriam. Merriam is a retired judge, champion breeder of bull terriers and past chairman of board of the American Kennel Club, but this will be his first time judging the Best in Show dog at Westminster.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

6 Tips From An Online Dating Coach

Looking for love online? Dating coach Kimberly Koehler has some advice to share. (Ashley Bishop/Flickr)

Online dating is now a billion-dollar business. Singles have their choice of a number of Internet services through apps and websites that range from totally free to very costly.

There are also online dating coaches, like Kimberly Koehler. She charges $200 for her online class teaching dating strategies. She also offers one-on-one dating coaching for $495.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

Water Cooler: Social Media News From SNL To #BOSnow

Will Ferrell and Cheri Oteri play "Spartan Cheerleaders" in a skit on "Saturday Night Live." (Mary Ellen Matthews/NBC via AP)

Annie Colbert of Mashable joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to take a look at how the news is reverberating on social media, from meteorologist Jim Cantore’s celebration over “thundersnow” in Plymouth, Mass., to Saturday Night Live’s 40 year anniversary celebration.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

Greece Rejects New Bailout Offer From Europe

The eurozone’s top official on Monday effectively gave Greece an ultimatum to request an extension to the country’s bailout program, a proposal Athens has so far rejected stridently.

Greece and its eurozone creditors have been at an impasse over how to lighten the country’s bailout loans.

Athens would like to scrap the existing bailout program and instead agree on a “bridging program” to support its finances. Greece’s new government blames the current bailout program for inflicting budget austerity on the country and has promised its electors it would get rid of it.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Love Lessons From WNYC's 'Death, Sex & Money'

Anna Sale is the host and managing editor of the WNYC podcast "Death, Sex & Money." (Amy Pearl/WNYC)

For nearly a year, Anna Sale has been talking to people about love and life – and not just the fun parts. She’s the host of “Death Sex & Money,” a podcast from WNYC about “the things we think about a lot, and need to talk about more.”

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Parents Of Slain Hostage Ask The U.S. To Do More

Diane and John Foley, parents of journalist James Foley, sit for a portrait at their home during an interview August 24, 2014, in Rochester, New Hampshire. (Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images)

Earlier this week, we spoke to the parents of Austin Tice, a former marine and freelance journalist kidnapped in Syria in 2012. Marc and Debra Tice said they’ve received little assistance from the Syrian and U.S. governments in securing the safe release of their son.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Expedia And Orbitz To Merge In The Face Of Competition

Expedia has reached a deal to buy Orbitz in order to strengthen their enterprise against competition. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Expedia has reached a deal to buy Orbitz, as both travel companies try to defend their turf from the likes of Google and Airbnb.

The companies are also facing competition from hotels and airlines who are increasingly doing business through their own websites.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan of Bloomberg News about the implications for the industry.

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NPR Story
12:51 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Eavesdropping On The Ocean

(Graphic by Rachel Feierman via WHYY)

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 2:32 pm

There’s a layer in the ocean – in between the warm surface waters and the deep, high pressured waters – where sound waves move more slowly. The so-called SOFAR channel is a sweet spot of ocean acoustics.

American and Soviet researchers independently discovered the channel in the 1940s. The U.S. military deployed hydrophones in the underwater channel for surveillance purposes, and today still uses them for scientific research.

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NPR Story
12:51 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

DJ Sessions: Fusing Jazz, Classical And Roots

The Fretful Porcupine is Jake Armerding (strings) and Kevin Gosa (saxophones). (thefretfulporcupine.com)

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 1:41 pm

For this week’s DJ Session, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with Julie Lavender, a jazz musician and host of Dream Farm Radio in New Hampshire. She shares some of her favorite new eclectic jazz, from artist Mark Shilansky and the group The Fretful Porcupine.

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NPR Story
12:51 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Oil Isn't The Only Commodity That's Taken a Nosedive

Oil prices have fallen nearly 60 percent since June, but it’s not the only commodity that’s dropping in value. Grains, metals and other bulk products have been plunging too.

Since February 2011, copper has fallen from $4.50 a pound to $2.53; corn fell from $7.50 a bushel to $3.88. The changes have a put a squeeze on farmers and miners, but so far they haven’t really trickled down to consumers.

NPR’s Marilyn Geewax joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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NPR Story
1:09 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Pepsi And Coke Grapple With Shrinking Demand For Soda

(tigerzeye/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed February 18, 2015 11:15 am

PepsiCo today reported that the company’s revenue and profit fell in its fourth quarter, a day after The Coca-Cola Company reported that its earnings fell 55 percent last quarter.

Both companies are grappling with a weak demand for soda. Pepsi continues to rely on its snack business Frito-Lay to offset some of the declines in the soda market. CNN’s Maggie Lake discusses Pepsi and Coke’s struggles with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Mimi Sheraton's '1,000 Foods To Eat Before You Die'

Mimi Sheraton's latest book is "1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die." (Courtesy)

Originally published on Wed February 11, 2015 2:01 pm

Mimi Sheraton has written about food for some six decades. She’s been the restaurant critic for The New York Times, traveled the world writing about food for numerous magazines and published several books including the James Beard award winning “The Whole World Loves Chicken Soup: Recipes and Lore to Comfort Body and Soul.”

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Choices While Pregnant With Cancer: Shellfish? No. Chemo? Yes.

Mary Harris was relieved when Stella was born with a mop of thick black hair, as if she had been protected from the chemo somehow. (Howard Harris)

When Mary Harris was 35 years old, she got the devastating diagnosis that she had breast cancer. As she was preparing to deal with surgery and chemotherapy, she got another surprising piece of news: she was also pregnant.

Harris was faced with a series of wrenching decisions about how to treat her cancer while also trying to protect the health of her unborn baby. Her story is featured as part of a 10-part series on cancer co-produced by WNYC and NPR.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

Labor Secretary Calls Surge In Job Openings 'A Good Sign'

On the heels of last Friday’s jobs report, the U.S. Department of Labor released new numbers today that put some flesh on the bones of Friday’s report, which showed employers adding 257,000 new jobs.

Today’s Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) shows there were 5 million job openings at the end of December 2014, the highest number since January 2001.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

The Real Eddie Huang Of 'Fresh Off The Boat'

Producer Eddie Huang speaks onstage during the 'Fresh Off the Boat' panel at the Disney/ABC Television Group portion of the 2015 Winter Television Critics Association press tour at the Langham Hotel on January 14, 2015 in Pasadena, California. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Tonight, “Fresh Off the Boat” moves into its regular time slot on ABC. It’s the first network sitcom in two decades to feature an Asian-American family.

Though the show is inspired by former restaurateur, TV show host and author Eddie Huang‘s 2013 memoir of the same name, the real Eddie Huang is ambivalent about the show.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

Samsung Faces Backlash Over TV Capable Of Spying

Consumers are suspicious of the new Samsung smart TV's voice recording capability. (PRNewsFoto/M-GO/AP)

Samsung Electronics is downplaying the possibility that its Smart TVs are spying on viewers. The statement comes after reporters found a statement in the privacy policy for Samsung’s Smart TV warning users about how their voices could be captured when they use the voice recognition feature.

The policy reads: "Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.”

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Mon February 9, 2015

A Transgender Police Officer's Marriage In Transition

Greg Abbink and Joan Henke were married in 2012. Greg was born a female. This summer, he decided to transition. (Filipa Rodrigues for KUT)

Greg Abbink, the first transgender police officer in Austin, Texas, has had to come out of the closet twice in his life: first, many years ago, as a lesbian, and more recently, as transgender.

His wife is going through some difficulties adjusting to Greg’s transition from female to male but she knows that Greg is the same person she fell in love with years ago when he was known as Emily.

Reporter Joy Diaz of KUT has this profile.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Mon February 9, 2015

Former Foe Remembers Coach Dean Smith

Former North Carolina Tar Heels head coach Dean Smith attends a halftime ceremony honoring ACC legends at the Virginia Tech Hokies and Tar Heels game at the 2008 Men's ACC Basketball Tournament at Bobcats Arena on March 15, 2008 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

Legendary college basketball coach Dean Smith died on Saturday at the age of 83. He coached the University of North Carolina Tar Heels for 36 years and his teams won two national championships.

He’s being remembered by former players, including Michael Jordan, as a father figure. Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd speaks with one of Smith’s former rivals, retired Georgia Tech head coach Bobby Cremins, who says Smith “made the game of basketball better.”

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Mon February 9, 2015

Mayor Of London Visits Snowy Boston

London Mayor Boris Johnson is pictured in London on January 11, 2015. (Niklas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images)

London Mayor Boris Johnson is like many big city mayors. He likes to promote the city he leads. Johnson is visiting the United States this week and he arrived at his first stop, Boston, during the latest blizzard.

It’s a trade mission that will also include a stop in New York City, but it’s also a bit about politics, as Johnson tries to raise his already high profile by meeting with Hillary Clinton.

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Fri February 6, 2015

White House: No Evidence Backing Up Claim Of American's Death

The White House says it hasn’t seen any evidence at this time to corroborate the Islamic State group’s claims that an American female hostage has been killed in a Jordanian airstrike.

National Security Council spokeswoman Bernadette Meehan says the White House is “deeply concerned” by the reports but has not seen evidence to support the claims.

A purported statement by the Islamic State claims the woman was killed in an airstrike Friday on the outskirts of the northern Syrian city of Raqqa, the militant group’s main stronghold.

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Fri February 6, 2015

NPR Reporter Reflects On Two Years In Afghanistan

Squeak joins Sean for a jam session. (Courtesy of Sean Carberry)

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 1:40 pm

At the end of December, as the U.S. announced the end of its combat mission in Afghanistan, NPR correspondent Sean Carberry was also wrapping up his time there.

Sean lived in Kabul since mid-2012, covering the country’s tumultuous and ongoing political and security transition.

Now back in the U.S., he joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to reflect on his time in Afghanistan, and talk about his own transition.

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Fri February 6, 2015

Making Music From NASA's Sound Archives

Liftoff of the Apollo 17 Saturn V Moon Rocket from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 12:33 a.m., December 7, 1972. (NASA Flickr Commons)

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 1:40 pm

NASA has taken years of sound from its historic space flights and probe missions and put it online. All the sound is free on SoundCloud, and you can use it for whatever you want. That gave two musicians a brilliant idea.

While working on a soundtrack for a documentary about aliens, musicians Davide Cairo and Giacomo Muzzacato stumbled upon NASA’s massive sound library. While some people may hear bleeps and bloops and mechanical gears, with a little remixing, they heard music.

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NPR Story
3:27 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

What Really Happened The Night 43 Students Disappeared?

Family members of 43 missing students from Guerrero State in Mexico protest in the Zocalo to demand answers from the government of the missing students on November 5, 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)

This week, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced a new anti-corruption initiative that will investigate allegations made against the federal government, including himself.

It’s a move, perhaps, in response to the rising public criticism of the government following the disappearance of 43 Mexican students.

Those students have been declared dead by the country’s attorney general, but the bloody and tragic events that led up to those abductions are still shrouded in mystery.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

Staples And Office Depot Merger: What Does It Say About Office Supply Business?

Staples bought Office Depot for $6.3 billion this week. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 3:27 pm

Stapes announced this week that it is acquiring Office Depot in a $6.3 billion merger deal.

The deal is expected to be scrutinized by regulators wary of reducing competition. But the two retailers argue that there’s a range of competition online from the likes of Walmart and Amazon, and that the merger would keep them competitive.

Derek Thompson, senior editor at the Atlantic, tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young what this merger could mean.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

DJ Sessions: From Bjork To Bruno Mars

Recording artist Bruno Mars performs onstage during the iHeartRadio Music Festival at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on September 21, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Rich Polk/Getty Images for Clear Channel)

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 3:27 pm

Travis Holcombe of KCRW in Santa Monica, California shares some of his favorite new music of the year, including artist Mark Ronson, whose song “Uptown Funk,” featuring Bruno Mars is getting a lot of time on the radio and was recently the top song on Spotify.

Holcombe says that most people know the song as a Bruno Marks song, even though it’s by Mark Ronson.

We also hear new sounds from Bjork, who is out with a new album, which chronicles a recent breakup.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

Will Harper Lee's New Novel Overshadow Her First Book?

Pulitzer Prize winner and "To Kill A Mockingbird" author Harper Lee smiles before receiving the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 7:09 am

Its been half a century since the release of the literary masterpiece “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

Yesterday when news hit the web you could hear squeals of delight around the world about her highly anticipated new novel, “Go Set a Watchman,” due out in July.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

New FCC Proposal May Ban Internet Fast-Lanes

Federal Communication Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler waits for a hearing at the FCC December 11, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission Tom Wheeler on Wednesday proposed new rules that would treat the Internet like a public utility.

The new rules aim to prohibit access to so-called Internet fast-lanes for companies and websites willing to pay for faster delivery of their content.

The commission will vote on the rules later this month. And they could have a widespread impact on how we all use the Internet and the status of what’s known as “net neutrality.”

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

Automotive Rally Continues With Strong Sales

General Motors recorded a 91 percent jump in profit in the fourth quarter. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

U.S. automakers reported strong sales in January, a time of year that’s normally slow for the industry.

General Motors also recorded a 91 percent jump in profit in the fourth quarter. The company says it will issue $9,000 profit-sharing checks to 48,000 of its employees.

The auto industry is in the midst of a rebound after the recession brought many of the large automakers to the brink of collapse several years ago.

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