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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

Southern Poverty Law Center: Charleston Shooting Is 'An Obvious Hate Crime'

A memorial near the Emanuel AME Church is viewed on June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the church on the evening of June 17, 2015. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Police say they’ve captured a man they suspect opened fire and killed nine people at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina, last night. Authorities released stills from a security video they say shows 21-year-old Dylann Roof entering the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal church about an hour before the shooting.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

Waterloo Changed The World, But For Better Or Worse?

Battle of Waterloo re-enactors walk near the Lion's Mound during a historical walk for journalists in Braine-l'Alleud, near Waterloo, Belgium. On Wednesday, June 17, 2015, four days of commemoration will begin on the historic battlefield, with the re-opening of Hougoumont farm and a reconstruction of the battle with more than 5,000 re-enactors. (Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP)

Today is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, which brought down Napoleon Bonaparte for good.

But even with 200 years perspective, historians disagree about Napoleon’s legacy. Some see him as a tyrant determined to build an empire at all costs. Others give him credit for introducing ideals such as public education and meritocracy that form the basis of modern society.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

International Students Unsettled After Balcony Collapse In Berkeley

Two women embrace while watching sheriff's deputies move the body of a person who died when a fourth floor balcony collapsed in Berkeley, Calif. on Tuesday, June 16, 2015. (Noah Berger/AP)

The San Francisco Bay Area has always been a draw for Irish students working for the summer. They come on a special work/travel visa program that brings thousands of international college students to California each year.

But after a tragedy this week in Berkeley that took the lives of five college students from Ireland, young adults drawn to this area for school or work are feeling unsettled, as Youth Radio’s Olivia Cueva reports.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

Jeb Bush Slow Jams The News

Jeb Bush "slow jamming the news" on "The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon." (YouTube)

[Youtube]

We listen to Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush “slow jam the news” with Jimmy Fallon last night on “The Tonight Show.”

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
12:55 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

Alaskan Wildfire Hits The Heart Of Mushing Country

Steve Charles sits alongside his sled dog, Bridger, at an American Red Cross evacuation center in Houston, Alaska, on Monday, June 15, 2015. Many mushers had to evacuate not only themselves or but their dogs after a fast-spreading wildfire sprang up near Willow, Alaska. (Mark Thiessen/AP)

A ferocious wildfire in Alaska is threatening homes and forest, but also one very special type of resident.

More than 500 sled dogs have been evacuated from Willow, Alaska – the traditional starting place for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The fire began on Sunday and spread quickly in the unusually hot, dry conditions.

Among the residents of Willow is Dallas Seavey, who has won the Iditarod three times and became its youngest-ever winner in 2013 when he took first place at age 25. He lives with almost 100 sled dogs of his own.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

DJ Session: From Summertime Pop To Brooding Electronica

DJ, producer and remix artist Jamie xx performs in Liverpool, England. He released two singles in March and is currently touring in Europe. (dannyjohnryder/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 1:21 pm

For this week’s edition of Here & Now‘s DJ Sessions, host Jeremy Hobson sits down with Travis Holcombe of KCRW, for his latest picks.

We hear artist Tish Hyman, who Holcombe says sounds a lot like Lauryn Hill, and a summer pop song from a group called Miami Horror. We also hear Jamie xx’s song “Gosh,” which Holcombe calls “my favorite track on my favorite album of the year so far.”

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NPR Story
2:34 pm
Tue June 16, 2015

Mongol Rally: London To Ulan-Ude In the Most Beat-Up Car You Can Find

Participants in the Mongol Rally will cross more than 17 countries, head through mountains and deserts, cross a sea or two, and skirt several war zones. (Mongol Rally)

There are only three rules for the 10,000-mile Mongol Rally car rally from London to Mongolia: you can take any car you want, as long as it has an engine of one liter or less; you can’t have a support team or road back-up; and you have to help save the world (or, to be more specific, you have to raise at least £1,000 – about $1,500 – for the rally’s environmental charity, Cool Earth).

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NPR Story
2:34 pm
Tue June 16, 2015

In Colorful Speech, Trump Announces He's Running For President

Businessman Donald Trump speaks to guests gathered for the Republican Party of Iowa's Lincoln Dinner at the Iowa Events Center on May 16, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

At the Trump Tower in New York City, real estate magnate and TV celebrity Donald Trump declared he would be “the greatest jobs president that God ever created.” He becomes the 12th candidate for the Republican nomination. We listen to excerpts of his speech.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:34 pm
Tue June 16, 2015

Will Three-Year Colleges Make The Grade?

The University of Iowa recently introduced a three-year bachelor's program. (derekbruff/ Flickr)

With college costs rising and many students struggling with loan debt, some colleges are offering three-year bachelor’s degree programs to reduce costs and send graduates out into the world a year sooner.

The three-year degree program is common in Europe but is only beginning in the United States. Professor Paul Weinstein, who directs the M.A. in Public Management program at Johns Hopkins University, tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson why he’s a big proponent of three-year degree programs.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

Match CEO Explains The Algorithms Of Love

It used to be there was a stigma attached to online dating, but not so much anymore. (jordansmall/Flickr)

One of the biggest online dating sites, Match, turned 20 this year, and a lot has changed since it debuted in 1995. It used to be there was a stigma attached to online dating, but not so much anymore. The Pew Research Center recently recently found a majority of Americans now say online dating is a good way to meet people.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

CVS To Buy Target's Pharmacies For $1.9 Billion

CVS will pay $1.9 billion dollars to buy Target's 1,700 pharmacies and clinics. (jeepersmedia/Flickr)

CVS announced today that it will pay $1.9 billion to buy Target’s 1,700 pharmacies and clinics. The purchase will give CVS, the second largest drugstore chain in the country, a chance to expand into some new markets.

The deal will also allow Target to hand off its pharmacies, which had not been as profitable as its other retail departments. Here & Now’s Robin Young talks with with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News about the purchase.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

Chinese Travel Boom A Boon To U.S. Businesses

Chinese tourists Zhang Jie and He Anrong pose for a photo on the ferry to Martha's Vineyard, off the coast of Massachusetts. (Peter O'Dowd)

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 6:06 pm

The number of Chinese millionaires great by a million in 2014. A report out today by the Boston Consulting Group says a strong Chinese stock market helped make the rich even richer. As Chinese wealth grows, so too does the country’s demand from travel. About a decade ago, fewer than 200,000 Chinese tourists visited the U.S. Last year, that number reached about 2 million. The rise of the Chinese middle class and new U.S.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

Half Marathons Race To The Front

Runners take part in the Covered Bridges Half Marathon in Vermont, on June 7, 2015. (Greta Kaemmer)

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 1:58 pm

In some ways it’s easy to explain the growing popularity of the half marathon. It’s obviously not as long as the 26.2 mile race, but you feel a sense of accomplishment that’s similar to finishing a marathon when you cross the line after running half that distance. Last year for the first time ever in the U.S., more than 2 million people finished half marathons, according to survey out this month from Running USA. That survey also shows that among core runners nationwide, the half marathon (13.1 miles) is now the favorite distance.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

Improving Police-Community Relations 'Boils Down To Leadership'

Members of Stop Mass Incarceration Network and other civil rights advocates protest outside LAPD headquarters after a homeless man known as 'Africa' was controversially shot dead by police in Los Angeles, California on March 7, 2015. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 1:58 pm

The tensions between African-American communities and the police officers have become a continuing conversation across the nation as images of the incidents trend on social media and dominate the news.

While the issue has reached the forefront of the American conscience, it is nothing new. NPR’s Michel Martin speaks with civil rights advocate John Mack, who is the former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, about his work in the department and the issues facing police.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

Lawyer For Tamir Rice's Family Wants Prosecutor To Bypass Grand Jury

Samaria Rice, center, speaks about the investigation into the death of her son Tamir Rice, at a news conference with attorneys Walter Madison, left, and Benjamin Crump in Cleveland on Jan. 6, 2015. (Mark Duncan/AP)

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 1:58 pm

A Cleveland municipal court judge has ruled that there is enough evidence to charge two police officers in the death of Tamir Rice.

The 12-year-old boy was playing with a pellet gun in a park last November when he was shot twice by police. Judge Ronald Adrine found probable cause to charge Officer Timothy Loehmann – who fired the shot – with murder, involuntary manslaughter, reckless homicide and dereliction of duty, and his partner Officer Frank Garmback with negligent homicide and dereliction of duty.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

Remembering Jazz Saxophonist, Composer Ornette Coleman

U.S. Jazz legend Ornette Coleman, right, plays the sax during his only concert in Germany at the philharmonic concert house in Essen, Germany, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2007. (Martin Meissner/AP)

Jazz saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman died early this morning at the age of 85 in a hospital in Manhattan. The cause was cardiac arrest. He’s being remembered as one of the most powerful and influential innovators in the history of jazz.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

Students Create Hendrix Tribute For Art Car Parade

Still in the early stages at the time this picture was taken, Electric Ladyland is all set for its wild ride down Allen Parkway this Saturday. These are some of the Reagan High School students working on it. From left to right: Mark Flores, Junior; Juan Sanchez, Junior; Alexis Caradine, Senior; Noelle Riall, Freshman; Alberto Herrera, Junior; Rebecca Bass, Art Car Extraordinaire. (Courtesy Houston Public Media)

A convoy of brightly decorated cars will roll through San Francisco this weekend. It’s one of several “art car” events that take place across the country each year.

What started as a small, motorized procession of hippie artists in their mobile sculptures has grown into an almost cult-like phenomenon. It all began nearly three decades ago in Houston. That’s where we met a group of young “cartists” preparing for their first parade.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

Social Media Buzz: From Orlando Police Video To John Waters Graduation Speech

In this screenshot from a video, an Orlando police officer can be seen kicking Noel Carter. (YouTube)

In our weekly look at how the news is reverberating through social media, Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Julia Turner, editor-in-chief of Slate. They discuss a new video showing a white police officer kicking a black man, which is now the subject of an investigation, and director John Waters’ graduation speech to students at the Rhode Island School of Design.

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

The Allowed Carry-On Size May Soon Shrink

American Airlines flight attendant Renee Schexnaildre demonstrates the overhead baggage area during a media preview of the airline's new Boeing 737-800 jets, at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport in Grapevine, Texas. (Donna McWilliam/AP)

The International Air Transport Association, a trade association, unveiled a new size guideline on Tuesday for carry-on bags on airplanes that would be significantly smaller than the bags allowed on many U.S. airlines.

A number of international airlines have already adopted the new guidelines, which are non-binding. Here & Now‘s Robin Young takes a look at the new sizes with CNN business reporter Maggie Lake.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Using Cockroach Legs For Prosthetics Research

Lego figures prepare to battle with cockroach legs. (Screenshot)

All big ideas start somewhere. With that in mind, undergraduate engineers at the University of Pennsylvania are starting with cockroaches.

They’re experimenting with different ways to control the insect’s legs after they’ve been amputated. Think voice commands and brain waves.

It’s the type of technology shaping the next generation of human prostheses, and the assignment gives students the chance to channel their inner Dr. Frankenstein.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

DJ Session: African-American Classical Musicians

Jason Moran performs at the Souillac en Jazz Festival in France in 2008. Moran currently serves as artistic director for jazz at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. (mpix46/Flickr)

For this week’s installment of DJ Sessions, on Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Terrance McKnight, a DJ at WQXR, New York’s Classical Music Radio Station. He shares pieces by African-American musicians and composers who are making an impact in classical music.

Songs In This Segment

Jeff Scott, “Startin Sumthin”

Jeff Scott, “The Gift of Life”

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

NBA Finals Head Back To Cleveland

LeBron James #23 of the Cleveland Cavaliers rebounds against the Golden State Warriors in the first half during Game Two of the 2015 NBA Finals at ORACLE Arena on June 7, 2015 in Oakland, California. (Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

The NBA Finals are tied at one game apiece, as the Golden State Warriors head back to Ohio to face the Cleveland Cavaliers for game three.

NPR’s Tom Goldman talks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about Lebron James’ legacy, Golden State’s newfound offensive vulnerability and a new nickname for the home team.

[Youtube]

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

100-Year-Old Lessons Discovered On Chalkboards At Oklahoma School

The aged boards show a countdown to Christmas in 1917. (Oklahoma City Public Schools)

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 3:52 am

At an Oklahoma City high school last week, what started out as a routine job for contractors – switching out chalkboards for whiteboards – unearthed some incredible pieces of history: hidden chalkboards with lessons from 1917 almost perfectly preserved.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Sherry Read, a math teacher at Emerson High School, where the chalkboards were discovered.

Interview Highlights: Sherry Read

On her reaction to seeing the chalkboards

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NPR Story
12:15 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Problems With Seafood Go Beyond Overfishing, Says 'American Catch' Author

Clerks prepare the fish selling department at Whole Foods Market in New York City. (Stephen Chernin/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 1:25 pm

Issues of overfishing and the depletion of fish stocks are often in the news, but according to author Paul Greenberg, consumers should be also be concerned with where the fish is coming from.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Apple's New Music Service Joins The Streaming Scene

Apple logos adorn the exterior of the Moscone West building on the first day of the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, Monday, June 8, 2015. The maker of iPods and iPhones is expected to announce its new, paid streaming-music service to launch this summer. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 1:28 pm

Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference is being held today in San Francisco, and a new music-streaming service is expected to be a major focus.

Derek Thompson, senior editor of The Atlantic, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss Apple’s new service and how streaming has changed the music industry.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Recipes For A Summer Picnic

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes for foods that can go on the patio, in the park or on the beach. (sophieh/Flickr)

Now that the summer weather has arrived, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst wants to eat outdoors! She joins host Robin Young with recipes for foods that can go on the patio, in the park or on the beach. They include:

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Switch-Pitcher Makes It To The Major League Mound

Pat Venditte of the Oakland Athletics throws in the eighth inning against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on June 7, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. ( Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Pat Venditte has the rare ability to pitch both left and right-handed. He even prompted a rule change in the professional rule book, requiring the pitcher declare which arm he plans to pitch with.

Last week, Venditte made his debut for his first professional major team – the Oakland Athletics. From Here & Now contributing station WPLN, Emil Moffatt reports on this ambidextrous pitcher’s journey to the major league mound.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Solar Gardens Grow Community Energy

Boulder's community solar garden, run by Clean Energy Collective, has the capacity to produce just under 1 megawatt of energy. (Grace Hood/CPR News)

A growing number of homeowners across the country are looking to get their electricity from solar energy, as the cost to install panels goes down.

But not everyone can put panels on their homes. Maybe it’s too shady, or the roof slope isn’t quite right. That’s where community solar comes in.

Grace Hood, an energy and environment reporter for Here & Now contributor station Colorado Public Radio, explains what it is and how it works.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Another Shot At The Triple Crown At The Belmont Stakes

Ahmed Zayat, owner of American Pharoah greets his horse after morning workouts prior to the 147th Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park on June 5, 2015 in Elmont, New York. (Al Bello/Getty Images)

The 147th Belmont Stakes are set to take place Saturday. Called “The Test of the Champion,” the high-pressure horse race is the final leg of the Triple Crown, coming after the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes.

All eyes are on American Pharoah, the horse that has a shot at becoming the 12th in history to sweep the three races. It would be the first sweep since the horse Affirmed did it in 1978.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

San Diego Is A Military Town

The USS Midway sits in San Diego Harbor in San Diego, California. The ship was decomissioned after Operation Desert Storm in the 1990s, and now serves as a floating museum. (Al_HikesAZ/Flickr)

Between the Navy and the Marines, there are around 80,000 military personnel in San Diego Country. The Department of Defense pumps billions of dollars into the area’s economy every year. Here & Now‘s Alex Ashlock looks at the connection between the city of San Diego and the military.

On a recent morning, the U.S. Navy’s past and present came together on the waters of San Diego Harbor.

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