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Here & Now

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NPR's midday news magazine.  

In the wake of disasters, there are a lot of people who need help — and a lot of people who want to offer it.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Bob Ottenhoff (@BobOttenhoff), president and CEO of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, about the best ways to give after a disaster.

Beaumont, Texas, is without running water after service from the main pump station broke down due to rising waters from the Naches River. Beaumont was hit by an intense second round of rain Wednesday, which left that region underwater.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with NPR’s Debbie Elliott (@NPRDebElliott) from Beaumont.

Some former homeland security officials have criticized the Trump administration for focusing on Muslim extremists at the expense of efforts to combat violent white supremacists at a time when hate crimes are on the rise. That conversation has taken on a new urgency since Charlottesville.

Lorrine Adamore is holed up in one of the three shelters the city of Dallas has set up for people fleeing Hurricane Harvey, now a tropical storm. It’s a familiar, and unsettling feeling. Twelve years ago she was rescued by boat when her New Orleans home was swamped by Hurricane Katrina and she relocated to Houston.

When Will The Rain Stop In Texas?

Aug 29, 2017

It’s been four days since Harvey struck Texas’ southeastern coast as a Category 4 hurricane. Harvey, now a tropical storm, has dumped more than 43 inches of rain in southern Houston since Friday, and forecasts predict more is on the way for the region and parts of southwestern Louisiana.

Officials expect more than 30,000 people may be forced out of their homes in Texas by surging flood waters. The damage is raising questions not only about the state’s preparation leading up to now-Tropical Storm Harvey, but also about the layout of its natural landscape and urban design.

Catastrophic Flooding Inundates Houston

Aug 28, 2017

Harvey, now a tropical storm, is expected to drop more heavy rain on the Houston area Monday. Officials say once Harvey moves out, drainage will continue to be a problem, and flooding that’s already devastated the region could get worse.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti checks in on recovery efforts with NPR’s Nathan Rott (@NathanRott) in Texas.

Hurricane Harvey is expected to make landfall near Corpus Christi, Texas, late tonight or early Saturday. Officials are warning the storm surge and torrential rain could cause significant damage.

KUT reporter Claire McInerny (@ClaireMcInerny) is in Victoria, Texas, and joins Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins with the latest on evacuations and storm preparations.

In Yemen, years of war have driven millions of people from their homes and left millions more without enough food and at risk of cholera.

Matthew Tueller (@USEmbassyYemen), the American ambassador to Yemen, tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti that the U.S. hopes to bring the warring sides together to try to negotiate a resolution.

Life-threatening allergic reactions to foods have increased by five times over the last decade, according to a new analysis of private insurance claims by FAIR Health, an independent nonprofit that collects and analyzes data on privately billed health insurance claims.

The National Hurricane Center says Tropical Storm Harvey is now Hurricane Harvey and is forecasting it will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti finds out what to expect from the storm over the weekend from Jen Carfagno (@JenCarfagno), meteorologist and host of “AMHQ” at The Weather Channel.

At least 20 organizations, including the American Red Cross and Cleveland Clinic, have now canceled fundraising events scheduled at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. But why do charities put on expensive galas in the first place?

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Doug White, former director of the Columbia University nonprofit management program, about what motivates nonprofits to spend big dollars at places like Mar-a-Lago.

Grayson, Kentucky, cafeteria manager Jason Smith didn’t have any formal culinary training, but he had a dream: to be a Food Network star. After 10 weeks of cooking, food demonstrations and exuding plenty of Southern charm, Smith’s dream came true.

Selling rhino horn internationally has been illegal for 40 years. But it’s now legal to sell rhino horn within the borders of South Africa, the country with 80 percent of the world’s rhinos. A court there removed a moratorium on the domestic rhino horn trade earlier this year.

As NPR’s Peter Granitz (@pgranitz) reports from the capital, Pretoria, one rhino farmer in South Africa hopes to auction some of his stockpiled rhino horn — and the sale is not without controversy.

Already this year, more than 6,000 people have illegally walked across the U.S. border into Quebec. Nearly half of them crossed last month. One of the most popular illegal border crossing areas is in Vermont just west of Lake Champlain, along a rural road in the woods.

Vermont Public Radio’s Kathleen Masterson (@kathmasterson) went to the border crossing spot, and has this report.

Ten sailors are missing from the USS John McCain after a collision with an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters.

Bradley Peniston (@navybook), deputy editor at Defense One, says it’s the fourth collision involving a U.S. Navy ship in just over a year. Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the latest.

Clemson, South Carolina, was one of the places across the U.S. located in the solar eclipse’s path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Nell Greenfieldboyce (@nell_sci_NPR), NPR science correspondent, about what she and other viewers in Clemson witnessed.

Doctors are warning spectators not to look directly at the sun without protection during Monday’s eclipse. It can cause permanent damage like solar retinopathy or blindness, especially for people outside the path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dr. Nhung H. Brandenburg, president of the Georgia Optometric Association, about how to view the eclipse safely.

Attacker Drives Van Into Barcelona Crowd

Aug 17, 2017

A white van jumped up onto a sidewalk and sped down a pedestrian zone Thursday in Barcelona’s historic Las Ramblas district, swerving from side to side as it plowed into tourists and residents.

NPR’s Camila Domonoske (@camilareads) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with the latest.

With reporting from The Associated Press

How Did North Korea Get Nuclear Weapons?

Aug 17, 2017

In an interview with The American Prospect, White House strategist Steve Bannon said “there’s no military solution” to North Korea’s growing nuclear weapons program. Going against President Trump’s threat of “fire and fury,” Bannon suggested Trump should tone down the brinkmanship with North Korea and focus on China instead.

But how did North Korea get its nuclear weapons in the first place?

President Trump is placing blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend on “both sides,” including counter-protesters. But what is true about what happened that day?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sarah Rankin (@sarah_rankin), a reporter for The Associated Press who was in Charlottesville that day.

A new study in Kentucky is raising alarms about teens’ mental health in the state. The biannual Kentucky Incentives for Prevention survey found that 8.2 percent of Kentucky high school sophomores had attempted suicide in the past year. For sixth graders, that rate was 4.2 percent. The study found increases in every age group it looked at.

There have been five mass extinction events in the history of the Earth. In his book “The Ends of the World,” author Peter Brannen looks at what happened to cause these crises — from massive volcanic eruptions to asteroids — and tries to determine what our future might bring.

In a few weeks, teenagers will stumble bleary eyed and yawning into middle and high schools to beat that early morning bell. But in California, that could change by 2020. That’s if the state legislature passes a bill next month which would require all middle and high schools to open at 8:30 a.m. or later.

In Seattle, where thousands of employees drive to work every day, parking can be a nightmare. But some companies and organizations — pushed by state and local government — are working to reduce the number of solo-car commutes by charging for parking by day, instead of on a monthly basis.

Suspended Fox News host Eric Bolling has initiated a $50 million lawsuit against HuffPost reporter Yashar Ali, after Ali released a report last Friday claiming Bolling sent unwanted, inappropriate text messages to female colleagues at Fox News in the past.

On Aug. 21, most North Americans will see at least a partial solar eclipse. But people in 12 states — in a 70-mile-wide swath from Oregon to South Carolina — will experience a total eclipse. The schedule is known with precision, but how do we know all this and when did we first know it?

North Korea is stepping up its rhetoric against the U.S. Early Wednesday morning, the North Korean military threatened on state-run television that the country is considering an attack on the U.S. territory of Guam, as a means to send a “serious warning signal to the U.S.”

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson responded to the threats during a stop in Guam. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly (@NPRKelly).

Nearly five years after Superstorm Sandy, thousands of victims have returned to their homes on the New Jersey shore. For most of them it’s a cause for celebration. But for others it can be the start of a new nightmare: Some who received aid money to rebuild are being asked to pay it back.

Joe Hernandez (@byJoeHernandez) from Here & Now contributor WHYY reports.

Scientists from 13 federal agencies have drafted a report, leaked to several news organizations, which finds that temperatures in the U.S. are rising and human activity — especially greenhouse gas emissions — is “primarily responsible.” Some scientists have expressed concerns that the Trump administration will suppress the report, since Trump and members of his cabinet doubt the effect of human contribution to climate change.

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