Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a3abe1c8428d5e1222ae|5182a3a6e1c8428d5e122298

Pages

Shots - Health Blog
1:04 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Ebola's Other Victims: Health Care Workers

A medical worker from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention works at the laboratory where Ebola specimens from the Congo were tested at the start of the latest outbreak.
Stephen Wandera AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:51 am

The Ebola virus continues to strike people in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since May, the World Health Organization has counted 72 confirmed, probable or suspected cases and 32 deaths.

As usual, a disproportionate share of those cases are health care workers — 23 of them, almost a third.

Read more
Law
1:04 am
Wed September 19, 2012

ACLU Pushes For Answers On Drone Strikes

A U.S. Predator drone flies through the night sky over Kandahar Air Field in Afghanistan. Drone strikes ordered by the Obama administration have killed more than a dozen al-Qaida leaders around the world.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:28 am

Drone strikes ordered by the Obama administration have killed more than a dozen al-Qaida leaders around the world, in places ranging from Afghanistan to Somalia. In speeches and public appearances, U.S. officials say those attacks are legal and essential to protect the nation's security.

But when civil liberties groups asked for more information about targeted killing, the CIA told them it's a secret.

On Thursday, they'll square off in front of a federal appeals court in Washington.

Pushing For Records

Read more
Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

The Big East Conference: What's In A Name?

Big East commissioner Mike Aresco answers questions from the media before an NCAA college football game. Aresco says there are no plans for the conference to change its name.
Jessica Hill AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:45 am

All you have to know about the nonsense of college athletic conferences in America today is that the Big Ten has 12 members, and the Big Twelve has 10. Honestly.

But as badly as athletic conferences flunk arithmetic, they do no better with geography. Next year, for example, San Diego State will be in the Big East. This is like, you never could believe that Vladivostok, way out there, was really in Russia, could you?

Read more
Food
6:11 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Golden Arches Adds McNoodles To Austrian Menu

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:05 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Zoo Staffers Gave Panda Pro-Pregnancy Pep Talks

Panda Mei Xiang hadn't given birth in seven years. After five attempts of trying to help her get pregnant, workers at the National Zoo were worried. So they started talking to her. One panda keeper told Mei Xiang, "I know you can do this." It worked — she gave birth Sunday night.

Africa
4:56 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Tunisians Fear Protests Scared Away Tourists

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's catch up, now, on protests that have swept through nation after nation, in response to an anti-Islamic film. And today, we go to Tunisia. It was the first nation to stage a successful uprising in the Arab Spring. It's a popular destination for tourists. And violence there, last week, took some by surprise. Eleanor Beardsley reports.

Read more
Afghanistan
4:51 am
Tue September 18, 2012

NATO Suspends Operations With Afghan Soldiers

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

At the heart of NATO's strategy to turn over security to Afghanistan, is the joint patrol: Afghan and international troops training and fighting shoulder-to-shoulder. Now faced with a rash of insider attacks - Afghans in uniform turning their guns on international troops - NATO is suspending most of those joint operations.

Read more
Business
4:11 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a delay in Arctic drilling.

A controversial oil drilling project in Arctic waters off Alaska is being pushed back to next year. Oil giant Shell blames a combinations of problems with an oil containment device, drifting sea ice and the need for permits. This is the second delay this year in oil companies search for oil in the Arctic. In July, BP shelved its plans to drill in the Beaufort Sea because of new stricter safety standards. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Business
4:11 am
Tue September 18, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: red, white or diet - wine, that is.

Weight Watchers has announced a new line of reduced-alcohol wines soon to be available in the U.K., the wines billed in the trend of popular diet alcoholic drinks in the United States.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
4:11 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney Forced To Explain 'Victims' Comment

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:04 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Mitt Romney says he's standing by the substance of his comments about American voters. A recording first revealed by Mother Jones magazine captured Romney at a fundraiser. He said 47 percent of Americans are hopelessly lost to President Obama, that they pay no income taxes, quote, "think they are victims, that they're entitled," and that he can't make them take responsibility or care for their lives.

Read more
NPR Story
4:11 am
Tue September 18, 2012

U.S. Calls For Calm Over Disputed Asian Islands

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Read more
NPR Story
4:11 am
Tue September 18, 2012

In China, Ex-Police Chief Waits For Trial Verdict

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The trial of the former police chief who ignited the worst political scandal in China in decades wrapped up today. Wang Lijun is accused of trying to defect to the U.S. and covering up a murder involving the wife of a one-time powerful Communist Party official. NPR's Frank Langfitt has been following the trial from Shanghai.

And first, Frank, remind us what this case is all about.

Read more
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era
1:42 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Shuttle Endeavour Begins Long Voyage To New Home

Workers remove a tree from a median in the middle of Manchester Boulevard in Inglewood, Calif., on Sept. 4 to make room for Endeavour.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:11 am

Space shuttle Endeavour begins a kind of farewell tour this week. The shuttle will set off on a cross-country trip to its retirement home, flying from Florida to Los Angeles on the back of a modified jumbo jet.

Along the way, the spaceship will stop off in Houston, home of NASA's Mission Control and, weather permitting, fly over NASA centers and various landmarks in cities that include San Francisco and Sacramento.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:36 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Becoming 'Anton,' Or, How Rushdie Survived A Fatwa

Salman Rushdie's other novels include Midnight's Children, Shame and Luka and the Fire of Life.
Syrie Moskowitz Random House

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:04 am

The recent violence sparked by the film Innocence of Muslims recalls a very different controversy from more than 20 years ago:

Read more
The Salt
1:36 am
Tue September 18, 2012

It's No Yolk: Mexicans Cope With Egg Shortage, Price Spikes

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:22 pm

There is a new crisis in Mexico. It's not the ongoing drug war or a plunge in the peso: It's eggs.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:24 am
Mon September 17, 2012

China Ratchets Up The Rhetoric In Island Spat With Japan

Protesters marched in front of the Japanese Embassy in Beijing today. They carried a banner declaring: "We are proud of China's rise. We resolutely oppose Japan's rightist forces."
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

China's state-run media is warning that Japan could endure another "lost decade" of economic stagnation should Beijing resort to trade retaliation over Japan's purchase of disputed islands.

The warning comes amid a surge of anti-Japanese nationalism across China that sparked huge and sometimes violent protests over the weekend. As the economic cost of the protests begins to escalate, it's becoming clearer exactly who might be behind them.

Read more
Politics
8:16 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama Launching China Trade Case

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

President Obama will launch a new trade enforcement case against China Monday, using the power of incumbency to counter Republican Mitt Romney's criticism that he is ceding American jobs to the Asian power.

Around the Nation
5:31 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Chicago's O'Hare Needs Help Clearing Brush

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a job opening at Chicago's O'Hare airport. Wanted: One herder with a flock of sheep, or goats are OK too. The Sun Times reports that O'Hare is looking for 25 grazing animals to clear out overgrown bushes surrounding the airport. Those bushes attract birds, which are dangerous to aircraft. O'Hare requires the herder to bring a mobile electronic fence to keep his herd off the runway, though apparently a shepherd's crook is optional. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
5:25 am
Mon September 17, 2012

South Korean Men Embrace Makeup, Skin Care

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. South Korea is a conservative society where men are dominant and also wear lots of makeup. A market research firm finds that this one small nation consumes more than 20 percent of the world's male skin care products. An AP reporter describes women applying lipstick to men, security guards behind layers of makeup and male flight attendants attending makeup class. A popular South Korean catch phrase is: Appearance is power. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

World
3:01 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Protests Continue Against Anti-Islam Film

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We begin this morning in the Middle East. The violent protests outside U.S. diplomatic missions in the region - sparked by a roughly made film insulting Muhammad - have ebbed.

INSKEEP: There is still plenty of tension, and in Kabul today, police held back more than 1,000 people who took to the streets throwing rocks at the police and chanting anti-American slogans.

Read more
Afghanistan
3:01 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Deadly Incidents Take A Toll In Afghanistan

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Read more
Business
2:48 am
Mon September 17, 2012

White House To Launch Trade Case Against China

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A trade dispute between the U.S. and China is at the top of NPR's business news.

The United States has filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization. Washington charges that China subsidizes its cars and auto parts, giving it an unfair trade advantage over U.S. automakers.

This move comes as President Obama campaigns in Ohio today. Ohio is a political swing state and a place where many jobs rely on the auto industry.

Business
2:48 am
Mon September 17, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: kicking the crack berry habit. That's what BlackBerry users at Yahoo are being encouraged to do.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And take up other addictions instead. Over the weekend, Yahoo announced it will buy employees the smartphone of their choice so long as it is not a BlackBerry. The company will however, pick up the tab with a data plan for the brand new iPhone 5 and the yet-to-be-released Windows Phone 8.

Read more
History
1:45 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Antietam: A Savage Day In American History

Between two farm fields in Sharpsburg, Md., there was a sunken road, which Confederates used as a rifle pit until they were overrun by federal troops. The road has since been known as "Bloody Lane."
Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:51 am

On this morning 150 years ago, Union and Confederate troops clashed at the crossroads town of Sharpsburg, Md. The Battle of Antietam remains the bloodiest single day in American history.

The battle left 23,000 men killed or wounded in the fields, woods and dirt roads, and it changed the course of the Civil War.

It is called simply the Cornfield, and it was here, in the first light of dawn that Union troops — more than 1,000 — crept toward the Confederate lines. The stalks were at head level and shielded their movements.

Read more
Around the Nation
1:38 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Kilpatrick Corruption Case A 'Classic Greek Tragedy'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:51 am

The city of Detroit is preparing for what could be the highest-profile public corruption trial in its history. Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick faces federal charges that he used city government to operate a widespread criminal enterprise.

In 2008, the then-mayor was embroiled in a scandal over racy text messages to his mistress, and his family was being pursued for interviews by what he labeled a white racist media. At the end of a televised State of the City address, before a handpicked crowd of supporters, Kilpatrick fired back at his critics.

Read more
Movies
1:38 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Toronto Looks East With Asian Film Summit

Luminaries including Mira Nair, Guneet Monga, Shailja Gupta, Nina Lath Gupta and Dibakar Banerjee attended TIFF's Asian Film Summit Banquet to discuss the growth of a new, realist South Asian cinema.
Peter Bregg Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

On Sunday, the annual Toronto International Film Festival came to a close after 11 days of screenings, meetings and, of course, parties. It's become an important place to kick off the fall film season. But this year, the festival wasn't only looking west to Hollywood — it was also sharpening its focus on the East, and the rise of new cinema from India, in particular.

One of the films at this year's Toronto festival was called Shanghai; it comes from Mumbai, and was directed by Dibakar Banerjee.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:03 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Aimee Mann: 'Charmer Is Just Another Word For Narcissist'

For Aimee Mann, the moment a song begins is often just before a performance.
Sheryl Nields

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

Fans of Portlandia may recall a recent episode in which its main characters (played by Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen) get a good look at their new cleaning lady. They think the cleaning lady might be — and realize that it actually is — the singer-songwriter Aimee Mann.

Read more
Africa
4:20 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Rwanda's Economy: An Unlikely Success Story

Rwanda's President Paul Kagame at the International Fund for Agricultural Development headquarters in Rome in February. Changes in agriculture have been part of the country's economic growth.
Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

East Africa is a tough place to do business. Want to open shop in Kenya? Prepare for a month of paper work, surly officials and bribes. To the west, in Rwanda, it's a different story.

"Registering a business takes just a matter of hours. It no longer takes months, weeks, as it used to be," says Rwandan President Paul Kagame.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:43 am
Fri September 14, 2012

What Anti-Islam Film Says About Free Speech And The 'Hecklers Veto'

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:47 am

After the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya earlier this week, Google took down the YouTube video said to have sparked the violence — but only in Libya and in Egypt, where anti-American protests also flared up.

It's an example of the challenges of balancing U.S. free speech concerns and of something known as the "heckler's veto."

The Innocence of Muslims isn't the only YouTube video that can be seen in the U.S. but not elsewhere. Nazi propaganda is banned in Germany, for example, and slurs against Turkey's founder don't appear in that country.

Read more
Strange News
3:49 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Cat Sneaks Onto Plane Bound For Disney World

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 9:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Pages