Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Around the Nation
5:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Daredevils Try Out Adult-Size Hot Wheels Track

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Hot Wheels and their twisty plastic tracks have long been a source of small scale thrills. But on Saturday, daredevils Tanner Foust and Greg Tracy went behind the miniature. They raced two rally cars around a 66-foot tall version of a Hot Wheels loop-de-loop racetrack. Seven times gravity was the hardest part. The only thing broken was a world record. Don't try this at home. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
2:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Fly Fishermen Benefit From Low Stream Levels

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:23 am

One of Colorado's recreational industries is experiencing an early season boon because of this year's low snowpack and ever-worsening drought. Fly fishing enthusiasts are loving the low stream levels, and fly shops are filled with customers. From Aspen Public Radio, Luke Runyon reports.

Business
2:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The chairman of the big British bank Barclays stepped down this morning. This comes just days after the bank agreed to pay British and U.S. regulators a total of $450 million, a fine to settle charges that Barclays' traders and executives had manipulated a key interest rate for profit.

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World
2:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Expedition To Search For Amelia Earhart's Lost Plane

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Another mystery that has long eluded many is the case of the missing aviatrix. Amelia Earhart disappeared on this day 75 years ago. She was attempting to become the first woman to circumnavigate the globe in an airplane when she vanished somewhere in the South Pacific. Her disappearance has stoked speculation ever since.

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Latin America
2:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Mexico's Former Ruling Party Returns To Power

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In Mexico, the party that ruled for more than 70 years is claiming victory in the presidential election. According to preliminary results, the PRI, or PRI candidate, Enrique Pena Nieto, won the most votes, but the apparent runner-up is refusing to concede. NPR's Carrie Kahn has more on this from Mexico City.

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Health Care
2:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

California Proceeds With Health Exchanges

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:23 am

Transcript

PAULINE BARTOLONE, BYLINE: I'm Pauline Bartolone in Sacramento.

California, unlike Mississippi, is already on the road to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. And after the law passed in 2010, it was the first state to get going to build an exchange.

Peter Lee is in charge of it. He never let uncertainty about the Supreme Court decision come in the way of building the new marketplace.

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Health Care
2:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Advocates Worry Texas Won't Expand Medicaid

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:15 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Texas, one in four people are uninsured, and the state's leadership has been vociferous in its opposition to the health-care law. Carrie Feibel, of member station KUHF in Houston, reports that despite the Supreme Court's ruling, political opposition to the Affordable Care Act remains strong. And that leaves many public-health advocates nervous about how the Lone Star State will implement the law.

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Business
2:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:07 am

More than 70 years ago, Samsung started as a company which sold dried fish and fruit. Now Samsung sells everything from life insurance, to hotels and chemicals. It's one of South Korea's biggest companies. And, it's still run by the same family: the Lees.

Sports
2:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

100 Meters Runoff To Decide 3rd Place Finisher

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The 100 meters is the fastest running event in Olympic track and field. But for the last nine days, the women's 100 at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field trials in Eugene, Oregon has been stalled by a much talked about tie. Today, finally, a resolution. Sprinters Alyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh will race in a run-off to break their tie for third place in the 100 they first ran two Saturday's ago. First one to cross the finish line today makes the U.S. women's 100 team. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us to talk about this.

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Analysis
2:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Democrats, GOP Say Health Ruling Works For Them

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 5:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Members of Congress have left town for the Fourth of July recess, but Washington is still reacting to the Supreme Court decision upholding President Obama's health care law. Each party is looking for ways to use the decision to its advantage in the fall campaign. Going into the weekend, a Gallup poll showed voters evenly split; 46 percent said they approved of the ruling, 46 percent disapprove.

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Science
1:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Is The Hunt For The 'God Particle' Finally Over?

This image, from a sensor at the particle accelerator at CERN, is an example of the data signature a Higgs particle might generate.
CERN

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:17 am

Before we get to the fireworks on the Fourth of July, we might see some pyrotechnics from a giant physics experiment near Geneva, Switzerland.

Scientists there are planning to gather that morning to hear the latest about the decades-long search for a subatomic particle that could help explain why objects in our universe actually weigh anything.

The buzz is that they're closing in on the elusive Higgs particle. That would be a major milestone in the quest to understand the most basic nature of the universe.

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Crime In The City
1:33 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Philly Author's 'Confession': I Lived These Stories

Author Solomon Jones bases his work on his own experiences on the streets of Philadelphia.
Milton Perry

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 2:49 pm

Philadelphia may be called the City of Brotherly Love, but author Solomon Jones sees the sadder, more complex side of the city.

Jones' books feature Philly police detective Mike Coletti. When we meet him in The Last Confession, he's on the verge of retirement, but before he can head off into the sunset, he's got to confront some demons from his past and catch a serial killer calling himself the Angel of Death.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:31 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Organ Donation Has Consequences Some Donors Aren't Prepared For

Most living kidney donors return to their daily lives in a matter of weeks, but for some, unforeseen physical and financial complications arise.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 9:44 am

Nearly a year and a half ago, Jeff Moyer donated a kidney. It's something he says changed his life forever. "Transplant surgery is a miracle," marvels Moyer. "I mean, to think that my kidney saved someone else's life — that's staggeringly wonderful."

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The Salt
1:29 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Pie-Making 101: How I Overcame My Fear Of Crumbling Crust

CIA Instructor George Higgins checks the slices of pie made by students.
Allison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 9:27 am

If you listen to my story on Morning Edition, you'll understand the generational divide that has led to my fear of making a pie crust.

So when I decided to overcome my fear, I did it the right way. I hopped on a train to the Culinary Institute of America, the nation's premier cooking school, in Hyde Park, N.Y. There I learned the foolproof pie crust formula that chef George Higgins teaches his students. "It starts with 3, 2, 1," he explains.

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Meat Week
12:17 pm
Fri June 29, 2012

If You Liked Meat Week, You'll Love Pie Week

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And we hope you've enjoyed Meat Week on MORNING EDITION. On next week's menu: pie.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HONEY PIE")

THE BEATLES: (Singing) Honey pie, you are making me crazy. I'm in love, but I'm lazy. So won't you please come home?

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Around the Nation
5:19 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Twitter Was On Fire After Court's Health Decision

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

World
5:11 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Train Offered For Auction Is Not A Toy

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Much excitement about a big bid on a New Zealand public transit train offered on an online auction. The broken-down train has close to three million miles on it. It's over 60 years old. That's significantly older than the highest bidder, who is four years old. The tech-savvy toddler's $30,000 bid has been removed, and the posting now reads: Adults only. This is not a toy. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Law
4:18 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Revisiting Some Recent Supreme Court Decisions

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 4:29 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Supreme Court's decision on health care yesterday was just one of several handed down this week. The justices also struck down mandatory life sentences for juveniles, citing cruel and unusual punishment.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

There are more than 2,000 inmates serving mandatory life sentences for crimes they committed as minors. The high court said judges should be allowed to consider mitigating factors such as a young defendant's immaturity or the circumstances of his or her upbringing.

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Around the Nation
4:00 am
Fri June 29, 2012

One Dead In Colorado Wildfire

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 12:06 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Politics
3:26 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Health Care Ruling To Fuel Presidential Campaigns

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 2:16 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

The Supreme Court surprised almost everyone yesterday when it upheld the heart of President Obama's health care law: a requirement that everyone either have insurance or pay a fine or tax. It's a big victory for president. It also gives his challenger, Mitt Romney, some important opportunities.

Here's NPR's national political correspondent, Mara Liasson.

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Business
3:00 am
Fri June 29, 2012

World's Biggest Brewer Acquires Another Company

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 5:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a new owner for Modelo.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The world's biggest brewer, Anheuser-Busch InBev, announced today it's becoming bigger. The Belgian company says it's buying the rest of the Mexican brewer known for the beer, Corona. InBev had already owned a non-controlling stake and is paying more than $20 billion for full control. Analysts say the buy will help InBev move into new markets. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
3:00 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Financial Markets React To Health Care Ruling

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 4:46 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Yesterday's ruling on health care took the financial markets by surprise. Stocks were mixed with some shares finishing the day sharply higher. By the end of the day, stock traders seemed to shrug off the ruling.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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Economy
3:00 am
Fri June 29, 2012

European Union Summit Convenes For Second Day

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 11:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And European leaders worked through the night last night, at a summit in Brussels aimed at tackling the eurozone's worsening debt crisis.

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: NPR's Philip Reeves is there and says they've reached an agreement on at least some issues.

Spain and Italy are among the largest economies in Europe. Their borrowing costs have been spiraling towards unsustainable levels. Spain has warned that it can't afford to pay them for much longer.

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Business
3:00 am
Fri June 29, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 5:30 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Our last word in business today comes from a giant in the advertising industry. Her name is Shelly Lazarus. The Brooklyn native began working at the ad agency Ogilvy and Mather at a time when the industry looked much like the one portrayed in the TV show "Mad Men."

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An industry run mostly by men. It was 1971 when Shelly Lazarus arrived at the company, fresh from Columbia University, with an MBA - a time when few women were earning business degrees.

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Law
3:00 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Chief Justice Robert's Vote Saves Health Care Law

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 4:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. The Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Obama's health care law defied many predictions: the outcome, the legal grounds, and the makeup of the court majority. For Chief Justice John Roberts, his definitive court opinion was either a triumph of judicial restraint, or a sellout, depending on who you talk to.

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Politics
3:00 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Undeterred, GOP Vows To Repeal Health Care Law

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 4:38 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Just last week, Republican leaders were warning their rank and file not to gloat if the health care law were overturned. Well, after the decision came yesterday, GOP leaders regrouped and vowed to keep fighting. NPR's Andrea Seabrook reports.

ANDREA SEABROOK, BYLINE: House Majority Leader Eric Cantor stepped up to the microphone.

REPRESENTATIVE ERIC CANTOR: If for nothing else, today's health care decision underscores the importance of this election.

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NPR Story
2:34 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Health Care Ruling Is A Mixed Bag For Insurers

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 3:57 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer sitting in for Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:34 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Results Of Court's Decision Will Be 'Devastating'

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 3:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

To Florida now, where yesterday's Supreme Court decision came as a complete shock to some elected officials. Florida's Republican Governor Rick Scott and his administration have done as little as possible to comply with the law. But now that the Supreme Court has acted, NPR's Greg Allen reports from Miami that Florida officials have some tough decisions ahead.

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StoryCorps
1:32 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Stories, Old Friends, A Good Time 'Til The End

Bishop Ricardo Ramirez visited StoryCorps in in Mesilla, N.M., to remember his grandmother, Panchita Espitia.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 2:15 pm

Bishop Ricardo Ramirez's grandmother lived a long and full life. But it was the way Francisca Espitia approached her final years that may have impressed her grandson the most.

Ramirez, 75, recently visited StoryCorps to remember his grandmother, whom he called Panchita, in a family story that begins in 1981. That's when he was elevated to bishop in the church. The occasion called for a reception — so Ramirez called his grandmother.

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Crime In The City
11:51 pm
Thu June 28, 2012

Sleuth Keeps His Good Eye On Mexico City's Crime

In heavily polluted Mexico City, crime writer Paco Ignacio Taibo II describes his exhausted detective Hector Belascoaran Shayne as looking out at his hometown and seeing "a city that was trying to hide itself in the smog."
Ronaldo Schemidt AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 2:16 pm

In the crowded heart of the Mexican capital, a fictional one-eyed private investigator shares a dingy flat with a flock of ducks and a rotating cast of lovers.

The central character in Paco Ignacio Taibo II's crime novels is Hector Belascoaran Shayne, a former engineer who got a "certificate in detection" through a correspondence course. Belascoaran is a cynical, bumbling private eye who marvels at the chaotic street life unfolding around him in Mexico City.

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