Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Around the Nation
4:47 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Restaurant Runs Out Of All-You-Can-Eat Fish

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR Story
2:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Certain Ford Retirees Face Major Pension Decision

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 7:05 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now to big money that's tied up in a company's pension fund. Tens of thousands of white-collar Ford retirees will soon have a big decision to make: Should they stay in the auto company's pension plan, or take their chances with a lump sum payout instead? The offer is believed to be the first of its kind for such a large, ongoing pension fund.

Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports.

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NPR Story
2:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:25 am

Fragrances for the man candles include Riding Mower, which smells like freshly cut grass, and First Down, which has the smell of orange and leather.

NPR Story
2:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

'Cloud City': Like Walking Inside A Kaleidoscope

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In New York City, there's a new structure taking shape high above Central Park.

ANNE STRAUSS: Once we started to hoist the modules with an enormous crane, people became aware of it. You can see if from great distances.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's Anne Strauss, an associate curator at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art. She's talking about a new exhibit in the Met's rooftop garden called "Cloud City."

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NPR Story
2:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Will John Edwards Take The Stand On His Own Behalf?

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 11:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In North Carolina, now this could be the last day of testimony in the John Edwards trial. At a federal courthouse, the former presidential candidate is being tried on six counts of campaign finance violations. Prosecutors say Edwards used nearly a million dollars to conceal an affair and hide the child he fathered with a mistress. The defense says Edwards wasn't fully aware of the cover-up and that any money connected with it did not come from campaign contributions.

Jeff Tiberii of North Carolina Public Radio has more.

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NPR Story
2:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a sign of confidence in the U.S. auto industry.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Berkshire Hathaway has bought 10 million shares of General Motors. The company owned by the billionaire investor Warren Buffett spent just over $200 million for that stake in GM. It is the first time Berkshire has invested in an American automaker.

NPR Story
2:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Debt Ceiling Debate Is Revived In Washington

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 4:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

If you thought the two political parties had moved past their differences over the debt ceiling, think again.

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Around the Nation
5:39 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Amusement Park Rider Conquers Battle Of The Bulge

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. People who are overweight often say there was that final moment - that's it; I'm sick of it. I'm making a change.

For Nat Ambrose, it was last year at King's Dominion, the Virginia theme park. He tried to get on his favorite ride, Volcano the Blast Coaster, but the harness wouldn't fit his 300-pound frame. He lost 30 pounds in a month. Tried again, still couldn't squeeze in. Finally, nine months later, 105 pounds lighter, Nat Ambrose has conquered the Volcano.

Around the Nation
5:28 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Super Glue Helps Man Go For Fist Pumping Record

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to James Peterson who sought the world record for fist pumping. Yes. Mr. Peterson made this gesture of triumph for 16 hours. The Akron Beacon Journal says to maintain proper form he super glued his hand into a clenched fist. Yes. A video crew recorded this feat and sent it to the Guinness World Record people. If they do not accept the record we hesitate to think what gesture Mr. Peterson will try next. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Europe
5:22 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Stevenage: A Place Where You Can't Be From

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The town of Stevenage, England, 30 miles north of London, was once a small patch of farmland with a few thousand people. After World War II, the British government created a massive planned community there and hoped it would become a model for public housing for the world.

Gary Younge is a writer for the Guardian newspaper. He grew up in Stevenage and found it to be a mixed blessing. Younge wrote an essay about it for the spring issue of the literary magazine, Granta. We began our conversation by asking him to read us a passage.

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World
4:40 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Quebec Students Clash With Police Over Tuition Costs

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's turn our attention now north of the border to Canada. New austerity programs are creating the kind of unrest we most often associate with Europe these days. In the Province of Quebec, a plan to hike university tuitions by 75 percent over the next five years has led to weeks of violent street rallies, often involving tens of thousands of students and protestors.

North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports.

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Latin America
3:27 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Mexican Police Investigate Latest Atrocity

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

A news item last weekend reminded us that we live in a largely peaceful country right next door to a country at war with itself. In northern Mexico on Sunday, authorities found the bodies of 49 people. They were left on a highway outside Monterrey about 75 miles from Texas. They are described as victims of the Zetas crime syndicate. And the dumping of bodies like this is not unusual in Mexico.

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NPR Story
2:42 am
Tue May 15, 2012

California Budget Deficit Grows

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

California Governor Jerry Brown wants to convince voters to accept two things they don't like: higher taxes and deep spending cuts. The Democrat proposed a budget yesterday which would only be the start of the pain. The other part would come in November with a ballot measure to raise taxes and spare education. Capital Public Radio's Ben Adler reports from Sacramento.

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NPR Story
2:42 am
Tue May 15, 2012

The Latest On JPMorgan Chase

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

JP Morgan Chase has long had the reputation of being one of the better managed big banks in the country. So how did it make a $2 billion blunder and what does it tell us about banking today, nearly five years after the onset of the financial crisis? When such questions are looming, we often turn to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

And, David, welcome back to the program.

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Around the Nation
5:52 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Pipe Shop Owner Fights For Free Expression

When Adam Spiegel rolls down the metal security doors at his Medford, Ore., store, a painting becomes visible. Officials told him to clean the graffiti or be fined. He tells the Mail-Tribune it's not graffiti: it's a mural. Some onlookers think the painting resembles a giant bong.

Around the Nation
5:29 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Columbia University Janitor Graduates With Honors

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 7:48 am

When Gac Filipaj fled war-torn Yugoslavia in 1992, he became a refugee in New York. He took a janitor's job at Columbia University because it included free tuition. But he first had to learn English. After a dozen years, he received a bachelor's degree in classics over the weekend.

Analysis
2:51 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Polticis In The News

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 5:10 am

The head of JPMorgan Chase says the trading strategy that cost it $2 billion in a matter of weeks won't really affect the bank's bottom line. But the trade happened during a presidential campaign where the economy and Wall Street are major themes.

Middle East
2:51 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Violence In Syria Has Not Abated

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Syria's violence has not let up. Over the weekend, Syrian troops continued their campaign against those who opposed the regime of President Bashar al-Assad. Let's talk about this with NPR's Kelly McEvers, who's on the line from Beirut. And Kelly, what's the latest?

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Science
2:51 am
Mon May 14, 2012

NPR Series To Examine Fracking

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:49 am

All this week, NPR is taking a deeper look at the natural gas boom in the United States. The series is called "The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers."

Sports
2:47 am
Mon May 14, 2012

NHL Action Moves On To Conference Finals

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:44 am

The conference finals are underway in the National Hockey League playoffs. In the East, the New York Rangers will face the New Jersey Devils Monday. In the West, the Los Angeles Kings have won Game 1 — beating the Phoenix Coyotes 4-2.

NPR Story
2:43 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Presbyterians' Views On Gay Marriage Vary

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:44 am

Twenty years ago, few Americans approved of homosexuality or thought gay marriage should be legal. Now, nearly half of all Americans support same-sex marriage, though most Christians are still opposed to it.

NPR Story
2:43 am
Mon May 14, 2012

South Dakota Tries To Avoid Oil Boom's Downside

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. The oil boom in western North Dakota has sparked one of the largest migrations to a single area in the United States since the Great Depression. Communities that once struggled to keep people at all, are now struggling to absorb all the newcomers as workers from across the country arrive to seek their fortunes in oil.

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NPR Story
2:43 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Ambassador Crocker Focuses On Afghanistan's Future

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 5:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Afghanistan's president, Hamid Karzai, travels soon to Chicago. He'll attend a summit of NATO, the North Atlantic Alliance, on whose troops Karzai's government depends. At that summit, NATO countries will be asked to pledge billions of dollars to support Afghanistan's security forces after NATO combat troops withdraw in the year 2014. The U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan will also attend that summit. And as he prepared to leave Kabul, he sat down with our own Renee Montagne.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Picture Show
1:29 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Dear Photograph: New-Age Nostalgia

Dear Photograph is a collection of photos that take us back to our early memories.
From the blog and book 'Dear Photograph'

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:47 am

You may have heard of Dear Photograph, a website that invites readers to submit photos of photos — images from the past, set in the present. Over the past year, the website received thousands of submissions. In fact, enough for a book, also called Dear Photograph, which was released earlier this month.

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Around the Nation
5:10 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Alaska Man To Make Uninhabited Island His Home

Charles Baird will be alone on the island for one year. He'll able to send short text messages, but won't be receiving any. By freeing himself from all media, he expects to have enough time to make a documentary about himself.

Around the Nation
4:58 am
Fri May 11, 2012

18-Month-Old Girl Turns Up On No-Fly List

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 5:10 am

JetBlue Airways apologized after removing a passenger from her flight because she was on a no-fly list. The passenger looks innocent enough — maybe because she's 18 months old. Her mother told WPBF-TV in Florida that the idea her daughter is a threat was "absurd" and "made no sense."

Around the Nation
3:27 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Arizona Sheriff Arpaio Plans To Fight DOJ Lawsuit

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 5:10 am

The Department of Justice has announced it is suing Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio because of civil rights violations. He became a controversial figure for his tough stance on immigrants. Arpaio says he will not surrender his office and will fight the suit.

Politics
3:14 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Pew Poll: More Americans Support Gay Marriage

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 5:10 am

For years, Andrew Kohut, president of the Pew Research Center, has been polling people on the issue of gay marriage. He tells Steve Inskeep his research suggests President Obama's evolution is very much in line with national trends.

Sports
3:14 am
Fri May 11, 2012

White Sox Groom Saladino For Big League Play

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 5:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This spring and summer, we're following two minor league baseball players. We're learning about the pressures on an athlete, the emotional highs and lows, and just what their lives are like. One of the players is a young man named Tyler Saladino. He's in the Chicago White Sox organization, and fans are excited about the future for this 22-year-old.

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Election 2012
3:14 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Romney Apologizes For High School Bullying Incident

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 5:10 am

Mitt Romney's presidential campaign is in damage control mode after an article in The Washington Post accused the candidate of bullying in high school. Romney says he does not remember the incidents. Several of his classmates independently recall him going after students who seemed different, vulnerable or effeminate.

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