Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Pages

Remembrances
4:42 am
Thu May 3, 2012

Seau's Death Being Investigated As A Suicide

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 8:31 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The sports world is mourning the death of a great football player, and by many accounts a great man. Junior Seau was only 43 years old when he died yesterday of a gunshot wound to the chest. Police in Oceanside, California, where Seau lived, and died, say they're investigating the death as a suicide.

Junior Seau played in the NFL for 20 years - 13 of them for the San Diego Chargers. He established himself as one of the greatest linebackers in NFL history. Joining me now is NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman.

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NPR Story
4:05 am
Thu May 3, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 8:31 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Last night at the Sotheby's auction house in New York, there was something to scream about. Our last word in business is: "The Scream."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As we reported yesterday, the Expressionist masterpiece by Edvard Munch went up for sale. There are four versions of this composition, but just one had been privately held by an heir of one of Munch's patrons.

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Asia
4:05 am
Thu May 3, 2012

Activists Changes His Mind About Staying In China

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 9:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Asia
4:05 am
Thu May 3, 2012

U.S. Tries To Clarify What Chinese Activist Wants

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 8:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's talk about this more with NPR diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen. She's traveling with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. She's in Beijing. And Michele, how did this seem to go so wrong so quickly?

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NPR Story
4:05 am
Thu May 3, 2012

Argentina Takes Over Spanish Energy Firm YPF

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 8:31 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with control of the energy.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: In South America, a shift towards political populism has led to the nationalism of an oil company in Argentina and an electricity provider in Bolivia. Both of the companies seized are Spanish. The nationalizations are hitting Spain during a time of deep economic crisis. And as we'll hear in a few minutes from reporter Lauren Frayer, they sparked a lot of anger in Spain.

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NPR Story
4:05 am
Thu May 3, 2012

Take Over Moves By Bolivia, Argentina Angers Spain

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 8:31 am

Bolivia and Argentina's nationalization of Spanish companies hasn't gone over well in Madrid. Spanish officials say Bolivia and Argentina will pay the price in the long run, as investors become weary of doing business if their assets could ultimately get seized.

It's All Politics
1:06 am
Thu May 3, 2012

That New Friend You Made On Facebook? He Might Be Named Mitt Or Barack

An image from the Republican National Committee's Facebook page advertises its new "Social Victory Center" app.
RNC via Facebook.com

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 8:31 am

As the presidential campaigns refocus on November, they're zeroing in on digital domains. In fact, the Obama campaign has spent six times as much money advertising online as it has on TV so far, though that's certain to change.

And Republicans are fighting back with a new Facebook app called the "Social Victory Center." (You have to be a Facebook user to access the site.)

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Around the Nation
6:13 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Thousands Of Bees Removed From New Jersey Home

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Law
5:53 am
Wed May 2, 2012

DOJ Downplays Expectation For Hate Crimes Law

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Nearly three years ago, Congress passed a federal hate crime law. It makes it illegal to target victims because of their race, religion or sexual orientation. The law drew protests from some Republican lawmakers and religious groups, who said it threatened their free speech rights. And the law has been used sparingly.

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Asia
5:42 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Bin Laden's Legacy Inspires Pakistani Extremists

Pakistanis walk past the rubble of the demolished compound of slain al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in the northern town of Abbottabad this week. Bin Laden's legacy in Pakistan appears mixed. Support for al-Qaida seems to be down, but bin Laden is still revered by extremists.
Sajjad Qayyum AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 11:07 am

The killing of Osama bin Laden in the Pakistani garrison town of Abbottabad one year ago Wednesday rocked the country's political and military establishment, and provoked widespread rage at what Pakistanis saw as a blatant violation of national sovereignty.

A year on, there are widely differing opinions among Pakistanis about the significance of the al-Qaida leader in a country where militant groups draw inspiration from him.

His legacy is in plain view at rallies across the country that evoke virulent anti-Americanism.

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Afghanistan
5:32 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Obama, Karzai Sign Partnership Pact In Afghanistan

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with David Greene in Washington.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Asia
5:19 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Chinese Dissident Leaves U.S. Embassy In Beijing

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

We are following developing news, this morning, in China. The Chinese dissident who sought protection with American diplomats in Beijing is now free and apparently heading to a new life.

INSKEEP: Chen Guangcheng is a human rights lawyer, a blind man who became involved in issues like forced abortion in China. Last week, he escaped house arrest by Chinese security forces.

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Politics
5:02 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Obama Accused Of Politicizing Bin Laden's Death

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 5:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Republicans have repeatedly criticized President Obama for what they contend is a weak foreign policy. Their criticism now extends to how the president talks about his signature foreign policy success.

Here's NPR national political correspondent, Mara Liasson.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: President Obama's visit to Afghanistan and his address to the nation were reminders of the responsibilities of the commander-in-chief and the attention he can muster at a moment's notice.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Presidential Election Protest In Egypt Turns Deadly

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 5:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Vast as they are, the interrelated problems of Afghanistan, Pakistan and al-Qaida are only some of the problems the president faces - and that will be faced by whoever wins this fall's election. Egypt is preparing for a presidential election of its own, the first since a revolution toppled President Hosni Mubarak. And today, a protest related to that election led to deadly violence.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Wed May 2, 2012

China, U.S. Resolve Blind Activists Fate

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 5:28 am

Richard McGregor, Washington bureau chief for the Financial Times, talks to Steve Inskeep about how Chen Guangcheng may impact Thursday's talks between the U.S. and China. The blind activist left the U.S. Embassy in Beijing Wednesday, and U.S. officials escorted him to a hospital.

NPR Story
4:37 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Occupy Protesters Mark May Day

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 5:48 am

The Occupy protest movement was out in force Tuesday. May 1 is traditionally a day for labor demonstrations. For the most part, the demonstrations were noisy and theatrical but restrained.

NPR Story
4:37 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Task Force Evaluates Consequences Of Stand Your Ground Law

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 5:39 am

The group was convened by Florida's governor and legislative leaders. The move comes after Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teen, was shot to death by neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman. Since the law's passage in 2005, there's been growing concern about the law among police, prosecutors and judges.

NPR Story
4:37 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Texas Battling Pollution From Poultry Production

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 10:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Americans are now eating more chicken than beef or pork. And meeting that demand is an industry that some have dubbed big chicken. Texas is a major player in the industry, and so now Texas must manage a problem that in other circumstances we might describe as fallout or blowback. Dave Fehling of member station KUHF in Houston explains what that problem is.

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Music
1:28 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Marcel Khalife: The Bob Dylan Of The Arab World

Marcel Khalife is a Middle Eastern musical and political icon.
Driss Ben Malek Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:03 am

The Lebanese classical musician and composer Marcel Khalife is often compared to Bob Dylan — not for his music, but for his politics. The Middle Eastern musical and political icon sings about freedom and nationalism.

Khalife is famous for translating poetry into music. For years, he collaborated with the nationalist Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish.

"It began when I graduated from the music conservatory in Beirut. The civil war started in Lebanon — I wanted to change the world with music," says Khalife.

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Europe
5:55 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Netherlands Celebrates Queen Beatrix

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:51 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Calif. City Debates Location Of Stone Head

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Africa
5:07 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Conflict Simmers Between Sundan, South Sudan

South Sudan is the country that voted to break away from Sudan. They've been jostling for control of border zones, including oil fields. And just as the two sides were sitting down to negotiate, fighting broke out.

National Security
4:47 am
Tue May 1, 2012

White House Official Acknowledges Drone Strikes

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The president's counterterrorism chief, John Brennan, made another statement yesterday. He argued that drone strikes to kill militants are legal.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Brennan's remarks were unusual. It's rare that the administration mentions drones at all. Yesterday, Brennan chose to say that the missile strikes by unmanned aircraft which take place in countries like Yemen and Pakistan fit within international law.

Read more
Asia
2:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

China Suppresses Coverage Of Two News Stories

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 8:05 am

Two stories out of China — the escape of a blind dissident from house arrest and the corruption scandal involving a top politician and his family — have attracted international attention. But inside China, the picture is different. The government has successfully suppressed the story about the dissident, Chen Guangcheng, such that most Chinese have never even heard of him. The Communist Party has waged a smear campaign against the fallen official, Bo Xilai, whom citizens see as a loser in a power struggle, a corrupt politician or both.

Author Interviews
2:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Caro Writes Alone Among Bookshelves, Filing Cabinets

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 4:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The writer Robert Caro has spent about 35 years writing about President Lyndon Johnson and he still isn't done. As we heard on the program yesterday, Caro has come out with his fourth book on Johnson's life.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Years ago, one reviewer noted that Caro's research was so exhaustive that his book on Johnson's youth in Texas described the average annual rainfall in the Texas hill country in the years before Johnson was even born.

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Europe
2:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

British Parliament To Issue Report On Phone-Hacking Scandal

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 5:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Over the course of more than 60 years in the media business, Rupert Murdoch has earned a reputation as a blunt-spoken businessman who comes out swinging. Well today, British parliamentarians didn't pull their punches against him. They released the findings of an investigative panel that spent months looking into the illegal phone-hacking practices at Murdoch's News of the World, the now-closed British tabloid.

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Music Interviews
5:02 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

How To Break Up With Attitude, According To Norah Jones

Norah Jones' latest album is called Little Broken Hearts.
Frank Ockenfels Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:38 am

More than 10 years ago, Norah Jones hit the national stage with her melancholic love song "Don't Know Why," in the process selling millions of copies of her debut album and becoming a Grammy winner.

But Jones' new album is different. She may sound like a fragile performer, but don't get her wrong: At 33, she's recorded a breakup album with attitude.

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Asia
5:23 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Wealthy Australian To Build 21st Century Titanic

Clive Palmer says he wants to build Titanic II to sale from London to New York. Like the builder of the original, Palmer says, "It is going to be designed so it won't sink."

Europe
5:12 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Paragliding Centenarian Regains World Record

Peggy McAlpine wasn't happy when she lost her world record. The Scottish woman was 100 when she became the oldest person to paraglide. That title was recently taken away by an American woman. So at age 104, McAlpine took the the skies again and regained the record.

Asia
3:23 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Two Crises Highlight China's Social Media Struggles

Blind lawyer Chen Guangcheng, seen in this image from a YouTube video, escaped last week after 19 months under house arrest. Searches for his name are banned on China's Twitter-like services.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 7:13 am

China is clamping down on social media as it grapples with a crisis over the escape of a high-profile dissident, apparently to U.S. protection. The case presents new difficulties for a Chinese leadership already struggling to deal with the scandalous downfall of a powerful politician, and it complicates U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's visit to Beijing this week.

Yet China's use of social media in dealing with these two recent crises has been a study in contrasts.

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