Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
2:47 am
Fri April 20, 2012

In Ohio, Romney Points To Obama's Failed Promises

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:46 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Renee Montagne is on assignment.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, good morning.

Lorain County, Ohio is a fading industrial community outside of Cleveland, and it's suddenly in the spotlight. President Obama campaigned there on Tuesday. Mitt Romney followed with a speech there yesterday.

As NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, Romney is chasing the president to accuse him of failing to live up to his campaign promises.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:47 am
Fri April 20, 2012

Murdoch's News Corp. Faces New Legal Threats

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And I'm Lynn Neary.

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NPR Story
2:47 am
Fri April 20, 2012

Examining Coverage Of The Trayvon Martin Case

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:46 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

The Florida judge in the case of George Zimmerman, who shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin in February, set bail this morning of $150,000. Zimmerman took the stand during the hearing and told Martin's parents that he was sorry for the loss of their son. Zimmerman is charged with second-degree murder, but he claims self-defense. Cable TV news channels carried the bail hearing live.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:42 am
Fri April 20, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:18 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a poor reception for Nokia's new smartphone.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NPR Story
2:42 am
Fri April 20, 2012

Federal Reserve Delays Enforcement of Volker Rule

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 2:31 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. The Federal Reserve and other banking regulators have granted banks a two-year grace period to come into compliance with the Volcker Rule. That's one of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill passed a couple of years ago. It restricts American banks from making trades that put the bank and depositor funds at risk.

But as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, regulators are struggling to iron out the details.

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NPR Story
2:42 am
Fri April 20, 2012

Google, Oracle Locked In High-Stakes Patent Battle

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:16 am

Two billionaires took the stand this week — both named Larry. Google's Larry Page and Oracle's Larry Ellison have very different styles and personalities. And that came across in court.

Planet Money
1:26 am
Fri April 20, 2012

When Lobbyists Pay To Meet With Congressmen

Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 3:49 pm

Yesterday, we reported on the fundraisers that lobbyists hold for Congressmen every day in Washington. Today, we hear what happens inside those events. The stories are part of our series on money in politics.

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Law
5:18 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Dutch Entertainer Sued Over Magic Trick

A Dutch magician has threatened to tell the secret behind one of Penn & Teller's most famous bits. In this shadow illusion, an untouched rose falls apart as Teller cuts at the shadow with a knife. Teller tried to make the offer disappear by paying the Dutchman the $3,000. When that was refused, Teller sued.

Around the Nation
5:04 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Is Nakedness Protected Political Speech?

John Brennan of Portland, Ore., was going through airport security when he was pulled aside for a closer look. So he removed all of his clothes, saying it was an act of protest. Facing charges, Brennan argues he was "nude but not lewd."

National Security
3:08 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Secret Service Forces Out 3 Agents

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 4:24 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, frpm NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, good morning.

The Secret Service scandal has now cost three men their jobs. The government says they were involved in misconduct in South America, and they are leaving the agency. Agents, as well as military personnel, allegedly hired prostitutes in advance of President Obama's recent trip to Colombia.

NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been following this story. She's in our studios. Good morning.

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Asia
3:08 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Avalanche May Alter Himalayan Combat Zone

Pakistani army soldiers work Wednesday at the site of a massive avalanche that buried 140 people, including 129 soldiers, April 7 at the Siachen glacier. Pakistan's army chief called for the peaceful resolution of the Himalayan glacier dispute with rival nuclear power India.
B.K. Bangash AP

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 3:44 pm

In the chill of the world's highest combat zone lies the prospect of warmer relations. Pakistan's army chief said Wednesday that there's a need to resolve the conflict that has Indian and Pakistani troops facing off at frigid altitudes of up to 20,000 feet in the Himalayan Mountains. An estimated 3,000 Pakistani soldiers have died from the atrocious weather conditions since deployments on the Siachen glacier began in 1984.

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Sports
2:42 am
Thu April 19, 2012

As NBA Playoffs Near, Teams Grapple With Injuries

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 5:39 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

There's one more week left in this lockout-shortened, action-packed NBA regular season and still it's anybody's guess which team will survive the playoffs and be crowned champion. You've got young, hungry teams, veteran teams trying to hang onto their legacies, and everywhere, it seems, injured star players. NPR's sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins me. Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Lynn.

NEARY: Tom, let's start with those injuries. Who's hurt and how's it going to affect the playoffs?

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Books
1:28 am
Thu April 19, 2012

'Boys On The Bus': 40 Years Later, Many Are Girls

Reporters surround Sens. George McGovern (left) and Hubert Humphrey after a Democratic presidential debate in 1972.
George Brich AP

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 8:15 am

The news business has changed a lot in recent years, and that's especially true of political news. But when you ask about a book that captures what it's like to report on a presidential campaign, one decades-old classic still rules: The Boys on the Bus by Timothy Crouse.

The rough-and-tumble account of the reporters who covered President Richard Nixon's re-election against George McGovern back in 1972 is part of a Morning Edition series on political history.

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Music Interviews
5:29 pm
Wed April 18, 2012

Anoushka Shankar: A Sitar Player In Andalusia

"There's a very primal, emotional response I feel when I hear flamenco," sitar player Anoushka Shankar says. "It's quite in the belly in a way."
Harper Smith

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 6:41 am

Anoushka Shankar is the daughter and protege of the renowned Indian sitar player Ravi Shankar, who is credited with introducing Indian classical music to Western audiences. Now, Anoushka Shankar carries on this tradition in more ways than one. On her new album, Traveller, she goes back in time to make the connections between India and Spain.

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Middle East
5:50 am
Wed April 18, 2012

Syrian Ceasefire Is Increasingly Under Threat

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And I'm Lynn Neary. Renee Montagne is on assignment.

In Syria, a ceasefire that's part of an U.N.-Arab League peace plan is unraveling, just six days after it got underway. Once again, dozens of people are dying each day, as the Syrian military pounds the cities and towns that have most fiercely resisted the government, and opposition rebels are fighting back.

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Europe
5:50 am
Wed April 18, 2012

French Village Takes Stock Of Election Issues

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

An outsized figure on the world's stage is fighting to keep his job. Nicolas Sarkozy has made headlines pressing for intervention in Libya, travelling abroad with his supermodel second wife Carla Bruni, pressing to free up France's economy and struggling with Europe's debt crisis. Now, with an election approaching, the French president is trailing in opinion polls against his main rival, the socialist Francois Hollande.

Sarkozy's future depends on voters like those who spoke with NPR's Eleanor Beardsley.

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Around the Nation
4:15 am
Wed April 18, 2012

Jamie Moyer Makes Major League Baseball History

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 5:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to Jamie Moyer. At age 49, the pitcher won a game in the major leagues. Many of today's baseball players were not even born when Moyer's career started. He never threw the ball very hard, but won with patience and control. This year, he made the Colorado Rockies and pitched seven innings last night against San Diego for a five - three win. Some pitchers throw a 95 mile an hour fastball. Moyer's was 78. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Around the Nation
4:00 am
Wed April 18, 2012

Roof Of Seattle's Space Needle Goes Retro

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 11:52 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Lynn Neary. The Seattle Space Needle is going retro. Built for the 1962 Seattle World's Fair, the Space Needle was meant to be a beacon of the future. At first, it was not universally well received. Prince Charles even scorned the landmark's original color. But to celebrate its 50th anniversary on Saturday, the Space Needle's sloped roof is being repainted that same shade. Some call it sienna. Designers call it Galaxy Gold. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Europe
3:03 am
Wed April 18, 2012

Britons Revel In Their Sporting Inventions

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 5:50 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

It's a mere one hundred days remain before the opening of the Olympic Games in London. From time to time, MORNING EDITION has been getting dispatches from NPR's London-based correspondent Philip Reeves, about the preparations. In his latest, Reeves says the British are gearing themselves up for this great contest, both physically and mentally.

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NPR Story
2:42 am
Wed April 18, 2012

Egypt's Banned Candidates Vow Not To Go Quietly

Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood presidential candidate Khairat el-Shater talks to reporters in Cairo on Tuesday. The elections commission has disqualified 10 presidential hopefuls, including el-Shater.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 6:48 am

Egyptian election officials upheld their ban of nearly half of the presidential candidates running in next month's contest. Among them are two leading Islamist candidates and the intelligence chief for former President Hosni Mubarak. The decision radically alters the race for a post that will shape Egypt's political landscape.

Minutes after official news outlets announced the election commission ruling, candidate Hazem Abu Ismail took to the airwaves to denounce it as a conspiracy.

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Asia
2:42 am
Wed April 18, 2012

Chinese Journalist: Bo Xilai Had History Of Bribes

Chongqing party secretary Bo Xilai attended a plenary session of the National People's Congress last month in Beijing, shortly before he was stripped of all his Politburo positions.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 12:10 pm

China is gripped by a tale of murder, betrayal, flight and intrigue that threatens the stability of the entire nation. At its heart is the death of a 41-year-old British businessman in a hotel room in the city of Chongqing last fall. The scandal has brought down a high-flying Chinese politician, Chongqing's party secretary Bo Xilai, and his wife, with China's state-run media hinting at their corruption and abuse of power.

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World
5:16 am
Tue April 17, 2012

Cardboard To Be Used In Temporary Cathedral

The New Zealand town of Christchurch is rebuilding after an earthquake left its 19th century cathedral in ruins. Its replacement has been dubbed "the cardboard cathedral." It's a temporary fix while the permanent building is under construction.

Around the Nation
5:06 am
Tue April 17, 2012

Couple Charges Rental Property Is Haunted

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 5:07 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Africa
3:09 am
Tue April 17, 2012

Crisis Between Sudan, South Sudan Intensifies

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 3:28 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

The crisis between Sudan and South Sudan has intensified with the north branding its recently independent southern neighbor the enemy. This follows two weeks of bitter fighting in the disputed oil-producing border area between the two Sudans. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is monitoring developments from her base in Dakar, Senegal and joins us now.

OFEIBEA QUIST-ARCTON, BYLINE: Good morning, Ofeibea.

Greetings.

NEARY: Now, Ofeibea, just bring us up to date on what is happening in Sudan and South Sudan right now.

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Space
2:00 am
Tue April 17, 2012

Shuttle Discovery To Be Flown To Washington

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 10:35 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

STEVE IINSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Tue April 17, 2012

Tri-State Tea Party Welcomes Romney To Philly

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 7:27 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Likely GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney is reaching out to a segment of the Republican base that has given him trouble in this year's primary season: the Tea Party. Last night in Philadelphia, he spoke to activists from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. And as NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea reports, what might have been a tough crowd turned out to be just the opposite.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Tue April 17, 2012

Why No Pulitzer Award For Fiction This Year?

The Pulitzer Prizes were awarded Monday, but not for fiction. The field had been narrowed to three finalists. Lynn Neary talks with Pulitzer fiction juror Susan Larson about why no prize was awarded in that category.

Politics
2:00 am
Tue April 17, 2012

Congressional Panels Probe Lavish GSA Spending

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 4:56 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, good morning.

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Religion
2:00 am
Tue April 17, 2012

China's Policy On Tibet 'Must Be Realistic'

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 4:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're going to hear now from a religious leader revered by Tibetan Buddhists and admired by countless others - the 14th Dalai Lama. A year ago he stepped down as the political leader of Tibet's government in exile to devote himself to spreading a spiritual message of compassion and peace. Still, he's been drawn into talking about violence since a wave of deadly protests swept through the Tibetan areas of China.

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Around the Nation
5:08 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Phish Organizes 'More Cowbell' Weekend In Vermont

In Burlington, Vt., hundreds of people showed up to try to break the record for world's largest cowbell ensemble. The jam band Phish organized the event to raise money for flood relief in Vermont.

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