Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri March 16, 2012

'Footnote' Takes On Ambition, Father-Son Rivalry

Originally published on Sun March 18, 2012 9:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Israeli film "Footnote" has racked up a pile of awards - Best Screenplay at Cannes, nine awards at Israel's Oscars, and a nomination for Best Foreign Language film at the Academy Awards.

Film critic Kenneth Turan says it's all deserved.

KENNETH TURAN: "Footnotes"'s subject matter sounds dry, unlikely, even obscure. The film is set in Jerusalem's Hebrew University and deals with the implacable rivalry between two scholars of the Talmud, the complex and sacred text of the Jewish religious tradition.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Business News

The Federal Trade Commission is looking at complaints raised last month when it was discovered Google was bypassing the privacy settings on Apple's Safari browsers to track user activity on the web. The agency wants to know whether the company "misrepresented" its privacy policy.

The Record
10:01 pm
Thu March 15, 2012

Ann Powers From The Streets Of Austin

Bruce Springsteen and the retooled E Street Band ripped through a nearly three-hour "secret" concert at the Moody Theater, the new home of Austin City Limits, during SXSW. Ever the showman, Springsteen crowd-surfed.
Michael Buckner Getty Images for SXSW

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:37 pm

The SXSW music convention takes over Austin, Texas, for five days each March. This year, NPR Music's Ann Powers is in Austin trying to catch as much of the action as she can. At South By Southwest's midpoint, Powers spoke to Morning Edition's Renee Montagne about the highlights so far (including that awesome Springsteen keynote, which you can listen to in its entirety), and what she's looking forward to seeing over the festival's second half.

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StoryCorps
10:01 pm
Thu March 15, 2012

After Tragedy, An Aunt Plays A New Role: Parent

Laura (left) and Phil Donney (right), with their Aunt Abby, whom they call "Tabby."
Liebman Family Photo

One night in 1995 completely reshaped the lives of Phil and Laura Donney. Their parents were arguing, and their father stabbed their mother, killing her. Phil was 7; his sister was 4.

Ken Donney was sent to prison, and the children went to live with their mother's sisters.

Phil, 23, recently sat down with his aunt, Abby Leibman, the twin sister of his mother, Nina Leibman.

"What was it like becoming a parent to my sister and I overnight?" Phil asks.

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Afghanistan
6:31 am
Thu March 15, 2012

Panetta, Karzai Meet After Villagers Are Massacred

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is in Afghanistan on a long-planned trip that has turned into something of a fence-mending mission. A U.S. soldier is accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians. That attack is the latest in a series of negative events involving U.S. forces.

Around the Nation
5:49 am
Thu March 15, 2012

'Downton Abbey' Actors Attend State Dinner

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:43 am
Thu March 15, 2012

Bottles Of Tide Turn Up In Drug Bust

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Business
2:00 am
Thu March 15, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: barbershop battle.

Barbers and beauticians are splitting hairs over the swirling red, white and blue striped pole that traditionally stands outside a barber shop. Barbers in several states are pushing legislation to prevent shops without a licensed barber from using the striped pole.

Many hair stylists say that they offer the same services as a licensed barber. But barbers say there are differences. For instance, only they can give shaves with a straight razor.

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Election 2012
2:00 am
Thu March 15, 2012

Biden Speeches To Frame Election Debate

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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Afghanistan
2:00 am
Thu March 15, 2012

On Afghan Trip, Panetta Meets With Karzai

Originally published on Thu March 15, 2012 6:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is in Afghanistan. It's a long-planned trip that's turned into something of a fence-mending mission. Yesterday, Panetta met with U.S. Marines and Afghan troops in the southern province of Helmand.

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Around the Nation
2:00 am
Thu March 15, 2012

Gas Prices Force More People To Take Rural Transit

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There is little question that rising gas prices are making life miserable for lots of motorists. But for small rural transit systems, it's both good and bad news. Good because it brings more riders on board. Bad because the cost of transporting them is busting budgets. Charlotte Albright from Vermont Public Radio has this report.

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Business
2:00 am
Thu March 15, 2012

Oil, Gas Drillers Face Higher State Taxes In Ohio

Originally published on Thu March 15, 2012 3:22 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Tax hikes and tighter regulations are in store for gas and oil drillers in Ohio, if the governor has his way.

Yesterday, Republican John Kasich called for sweeping changes and stricter controls in handling the state's shale gas boom.

Tim Rudell, of member station WKSU, reports Kasich is normally anti-regulation but is making an exception.

TIM RUDELL, BYLINE: Governor John Kasich told oil and gas companies to show him the money.

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Author Interviews
10:01 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

The Wild And Crazy 'Tweets Of Steve Martin'

Steve Martin has won two Grammys for his comedy albums. His film credits include Father of the Bride, Parenthood and The Spanish Prisoner.

After 40 years on the stand-up stage, countless comedy albums and iconic movies, Steve Martin is still finding new ways to make people laugh.

The comedian got on Twitter in 2010, and by now he has attracted nearly 2.5 million followers with his funny and slightly demented tweets.

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Africa
6:16 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Congo Warlord Convicted Of Recruiting Child Soldiers

Judges at a war crimes tribunal convicted Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers. A sentencing hearing will now be scheduled. Lubanga faces a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.

Around the Nation
5:40 am
Wed March 14, 2012

City Council Breaks Paper Products Stalemate

Originally published on Wed March 14, 2012 6:17 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:33 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Georgetown's Team Mascot Sidelined With Injury

March Madness has barely begun and a key figure in Georgetown basketball has suffered an injury. Team mascot Jack the Bulldog has torn the doggie version of his ACL. Jack's keeper tweeted the injury was likely from jumping on the couch.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Wed March 14, 2012

European Court Takes Up Crucifixes As Jewelry

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Britons are struggling with the issue of faith in the workplace. Two British women, one an airline employee and the other, a nurse, were suspended or barred from doing their jobs because they wore crucifixes at work. Now the two are taking their case to the European Court of Human Rights.

To find out how this debate is playing out in the UK, we called Lucy Kellaway, she's a columnist for the Financial Times. And she joined us from London.

Lucy, good to talk to you again.

LUCY KELLAWAY: Hello.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Wed March 14, 2012

The Last Word In Business

On the popular movie-rating website Rotten Tomatoes, Eddie Murphy's latest film A Thousand Words received zero positive reviews.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Santorum Sweeps Southern Primaries

It was a big night for Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum. He won the primaries in Mississippi and Alabama. Mitt Romney was running third in both states.

Business
2:00 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Business News

After 244 years in print, Encyclopaedia Britannica is making the move to all digital. The company said it was killing off its print edition to focus on its digital offerings.

Economy
2:00 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Major Banks Pass Fed's Recession Test

Originally published on Wed March 14, 2012 6:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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Business
2:00 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Wal-Mart Backs Hollywood's UltraViolet System

Wal-Mart announced an online video partnership with most of the major Hollywood movie studios on Tuesday. The idea is to make it easier for people to legally watch and share movies digitally.

Economy
2:00 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Fed Waits For Economic Growth To Pick Up

Originally published on Wed March 14, 2012 6:17 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Here's the good economic news: Employers have been hiring more quickly than the experts predicted.

INSKEEP: The bad economic news is that experts still are not sure why employers are hiring so quickly. While the U.S. economy is growing, economists are not sure it is growing quickly enough to justify the many jobs created in recent months.

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Around the Nation
5:43 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Buford, Wyo., Goes On Sale Next Month

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. You too could be the proud new owner of an entire town. Buford, Wyoming goes up for sale next month. It's at 8,000 feet, the highest town on the coast-to-coast Interstate 80. It's an old railroad town, once home to thousands, but now with a population of one. That person, Don Sammons, plans to retire from managing his businesses and move. So an auction comes in April - one gas station, one convenience store, a garage and a home. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:34 am
Tue March 13, 2012

World Pizza Games Begin In Las Vegas

Pizza chefs from around the world are gathered to compete in events like: largest dough stretch, fastest pizza-box folding and freestyle acrobatic dough-tossing.

Asia
2:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Beijing Bling: Wealth On Display In China's Congress

Yang Lan, TV host and delegate to the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, carries a Marc Jacobs handbag outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 3. Nicknamed "the Oprah Winfrey of China," Yang has also been seen wearing a Giorgio Armani jacket during the legislative session.
Wang Zhou/Imaginechina AP

Originally published on Tue March 13, 2012 1:14 pm

A leather belt from Hermes priced at almost $1,000 — nearly a year's salary for the average Chinese farmer. A bright pink, $2,000 trouser suit from Emilio Pucci. A red snakeskin Celine handbag that costs $4,500.

These weren't items at a fashion show, but luxury goods spotted on delegates hurrying to China's annual legislative assembly sessions.

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Middle East
2:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Syrian Government Accused Of Reprisal Attacks

Originally published on Tue March 13, 2012 4:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're following news this morning of more killings in the Syrian city of Homs. That's the city where rebel neighborhoods came under artillery fire for weeks and where two Western journalists were killed. Rebels later retreated, but residents and activists say pro-government militias have massacred dozens of civilians, mainly women and children. NPR's Kelly McEvers is following this story from Beirut.

And, Kelly, what evidence you have?

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Afghanistan
2:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Shooting In Kandahar Further Alienates Afghans

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When an American soldier reportedly walked through two villages in southern Afghanistan and methodically killed 16 civilians, including children, it caused an uproar from Kabul to Washington, D.C. Now, let's get a view from where the killings happened - Kandahar. I first met Ehsan Ullah two years ago when I reported on a Canadian-funded girls' school that he runs in that city.

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Afghanistan
2:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Shooting Adds To Afghans' Anti-American Feelings

U.S. officials have not released the name of the U.S. soldier accused of killing some 16 Afghan civilians in southern Afghanistan over the weekend. The shootings come as anti-Americanism already is boiling over in Afghanistan after U.S. troops burned Qurans last month.

Politics
2:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Why Compromise Is A Bad Word In Politics

Originally published on Tue March 13, 2012 4:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's one thing that many people mean when they say Washington is broken. They may mean that politicians from different parties seem unable or totally unwilling to compromise, and many voters hate that. And yet many voters also hate it if politicians from their own party should compromise with the other side. That could be considered giving in. NPR's science correspondent Shankar Vedantam joins us regularly to talk about social science research, and he's found some that relates to this political problem. Hi, Shankar.

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