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For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
3:05 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Senate Committee To Consider Fischer For Fed's No. 2 Spot

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 5:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Stanley Fischer used to be head Israel's Central Bank, and he was once second in command at the International Monetary Fund. Barring the unexpected, he'll soon be confirmed as vice-chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve. President Obama nominated him for that post. And today he'll go before the Senate Banking Committee.

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Code Switch
6:16 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Changing Demographics A Factor In Rhode Island's Gubernatorial Race

Two supporters of gubernatorial candidate Gina Raimondo walk past protesting union members outside a rally at which Raimondo announced her run for the Democratic nomination in Rhode Island in January.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 10:06 am

Parades, social clubs and awards dinners are part of the routine of political campaigns everywhere. But if you're running to be Rhode Island's next governor, then there's one more stop you just can't miss.

Namely, the makeshift studios of Latino Public Radio, which is housed in a two-story, single-family home complete with a living room, dog and cat.

This local Spanish-language radio station based in Cranston, R.I., was co-founded almost a decade ago by Pablo Rodriguez.

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World
4:50 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Unique Cell Phone Number Fetches Big Bucks In United Arab Emirates

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Back in 2008, eyes rolled at the news a license plate in the United Arab Emirates went for $14 million at auction. It wasn't gold-plated, but the plate had a very flashy number - one. This week, a charity auction in the Emirates sold a cell phone contract for an astonishing price. Its unique number, seven sevens, push the price up to over $2 million. Of course it did include 12 free hours of calls a month.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
4:35 am
Wed March 12, 2014

White House Meeting To Examine Women's Pay

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

President Obama is expected to meet on Wednesday with female members of Congress. There are reasons for the president's focus on women that involve both policy and politics.

Around the Nation
4:28 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Milkshake Mission Lands Car In Snowbank

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

A teenager in Michigan just wanted a milkshake. She and a cousin went to McDonald's, but it was closed. They used their GPS, found another McDonald's 12 miles away, also closed. The next McDonald's no longer existed. Around this point, their car got caught in a snow bank. Worried family members called police, who searched for hours. The cousins spent the night in the car, and walked to a business in the morning to call for help.

Politics
4:12 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Feinstein: CIA Tampered With Senate Panel's Work

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Senator Dianne Feinstein has accused the CIA of interfering with efforts by Congress to oversee the agency. Feinstein said the CIA had removed documents from computers used by her committee's staff.

Around the Nation
4:12 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Missoula County Attorney Tells Justice Department It's Wrong

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Accused of bias against female victims of sex crimes, the Missoula county attorney turned around and accused the Justice Department of bully tactics. DOJ officials showed up in Missoula two years ago.

Politics
3:10 am
Wed March 12, 2014

In Closely Watched Congressional Election, GOP Wins In Florida

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A special election for a congressional seat on Florida suggests trouble ahead for Democratic candidates who backed Obamacare in swing districts. Republican David Jolly claimed victory last night in a congressional district that includes part of St. Petersburg, beating a strong Democratic candidate, Alex Sink. As NPR's Greg Allen reports, the results aren't encouraging for Democrats looking ahead to the fall midterm elections.

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Europe
3:10 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Russia Tightens Stranglehold On Crimea

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. As Michele mentioned, Russia is tightening its control over Crimea. One sign of that: flights to other parts of Ukraine were cut off yesterday. The only flights available now are to Moscow.

Russian troops and pro-Russia militias are also taking over military installations. There is this referendum this weekend on whether Crimeans want to join Russia, but Moscow is sending a pretty clear message ahead of that.

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Europe
3:10 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Ukraine's Interim Prime Minister To Visit White House

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Television
3:10 am
Wed March 12, 2014

'Everything But The News' Lightens Up Staid PBS News

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The PBS "NewsHour" has a new Web-only spin-off. It is called "Everything But The News." It's the creation of former "NewsHour" producer Steve Goldbloom. The show takes a satirical look at the daily grind of a "NewsHour" field reporter. Think HBO's "The Newsroom" meets "The Office."

(SOUNDBITE OF SHOW, "EVERYTHING BUT THE NEWS")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (as Jordan) OK, listen. Great. We set up 30 interviews for you over three days.

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World
8:28 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Why Is Locating A Lost Airliner So Hard?

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Food
5:01 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Tiny Sushi Is A Big Hit At Tokyo Restaurant

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The sushi at No Hatchi Restaurant in Tokyo packs a big flavor, but it's so small customers might need tweezers rather than chopsticks to eat it. That's because the sushi is made with a single grain of rice. The restaurant's chef told Reuters that his miniature sushi started as a joke and then it became a hit. Radish and chili give the teensy pieces a bit - even though they're gone in a bite.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
4:53 am
Tue March 11, 2014

New Zealand Man Wagers His Name In A Poker Game

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. And I'm looking for a Mr. Frostnova. He's a 22-year-old from New Zealand who lost a poker bet a few years ago. He wagered his name. And after losing, he had to change his name to one just shy of the hundred-character limit for new names in New Zealand; this came to light recently because his passport expired. His full legal name, a mouthful, wait for it: Full Metal Havok More Sexy N Intelligent Than Spock And All The Superheroes Combined With Frostnova.

Europe
4:48 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Ukraine Crisis Weighs Heavy On Other Foreign Policy Issues

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our next guest is Aaron David Miller, a longtime Middle East policy advisor at the State Department. He came to our studio this morning to weigh in on the consequences of the Ukraine crisis on two other major foreign policy issues: The Syrian Civil War and the Iran nuclear negotiations.

Good morning.

AARON DAVID MILLER: Morning.

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Around the Nation
4:38 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Maryland Transportation Bill Held Up Over War Reparations

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now to a story of how a long ago association with the crimes of Nazi Germany could stop a French company from doing business today in Maryland. A Maryland House committee heard testimony yesterday on a bill that would bar companies that played a role in the Holocaust from bidding on state contracts unless the companies pay reparations to victims.

State officials told the hearing that if that bill passes, it could jeopardize federal funding for a major light rail project. NPR's Allison Keyes explains.

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NPR Story
3:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Fla. Lawmakers Turn Deaf Ear Toward 'Stand Your Ground' Protesters

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

Inside Florida's Capitol, calls to change or repeal Stand Your Ground are having little impact.

On Tuesday, several hundred people in Tallahassee, Fla., gathered outside the Capitol building calling for changes in the law. The march and rally came a month after a jury in Jacksonville deadlocked on a murder charge in the case of Michael Dunn. Dunn is the software designer who shot and killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis in a dispute over loud music.

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NPR Story
3:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Dropcam Lets Owners Keep Tabs On Their Pets

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Doggie Cam.

There has been a lot in the news lately about the Internet and privacy. And now it seems that even pets are under surveillance by owners.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's right. Thanks to a newly-improved smartphone app and device called the Dropcam, pet owners can check in on their furry friends while they're at work or out of town. Through the app, you can not only see your dog, but talk to them through a speaker as well.

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NPR Story
3:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Ice And Snow Forced Airlines To Cancel Thousands Of Flights

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So far this winter, lots of snow and ice has forced major U.S. airlines to cancel more than 74,000 flights. At an aviation conference in New York yesterday, top executives of some of the nation's biggest airlines spoke about how those cancellations are affecting business.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: American Airlines said it cancelled 28,000 flights in January and February. Almost as many flights were grounded by United Continental. At Southwest 6,500 flights were cancelled.

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Science
1:36 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Trapping And Tracking The Mysterious Snowy Owl

Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 9:02 am

This is Hungerford, a large female snowy owl. Last summer she was just a hatchling — a gray ball of fuzz in the middle of the Arctic tundra. In the fall, newly equipped with adult plumage, she flew thousands of miles south until she reached the coast of Maryland. And this winter, she became an important part of an unprecedented research project.

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Code Switch
8:11 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Stokely Carmichael, A Philosopher Behind The Black Power Movement

Martin Luther King Jr., shown here with Stokely Carmichael during a voter registration march in Mississippi in 1966, regarded the younger Carmichael as one of the civil rights movement's most promising leaders.
Lynn Pelham Time

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 10:26 am

Before he became famous — and infamous — for calling on black power for black people, Stokely Carmichael was better known as a rising young community organizer in the civil rights movement. The tall, handsome philosophy major from Howard University spent summers in the South, working with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as SNCC, to get African-Americans in Alabama and Mississippi registered to vote in the face of tremendous, often violent resistance from segregationists.

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NPR Story
5:07 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Model Cannolo Takes To The Skies In Sicily

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Sicily has joined the space-age.

Amateur scientists have launched the Sicilian Space Program with a homemade spacecraft, a helium balloon, and at the tip of the tiny vessel: a cannollo put the cherry on top.

Well, given the extreme conditions, the clay cannollo, still, cameras filmed the classic cream filled pastry soaring into the stratosphere, capturing a sweet view of the sunrise. One small step for pastry.

Around the Nation
3:09 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Italy's Culture Minister Takes Aim At U.S. Weapons Manufacturer

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

ArmaLite is a weapons manufacturer in Illinois and they're facing an unlikely opponent. His name is Dario Franceschini, he's Italy's culture minister and he's upset about an image from ArmLite's "Work of Art" ad campaign. It shows Michelangelo's David cradling an assault rifle. Franceschini says the ad "offends and infringes on the law."

Research News
2:57 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Military Conflict Decisions: Why Weakness Leads To Aggression

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

From Syria to Afghanistan, to Russia and Ukraine, the United States finds itself confronting some major foreign policy challenges. There are old rivalries and new one testing the limits of the United States.

NPR social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam regularly joins us to talk about matters related to individual and organizational behavior, but today, he's found some new research that's relevant to the way we think about foreign conflicts and he's in our studios. Shankar, welcome back.

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Around the Nation
2:57 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Indiana To Mandate Concussion-Awareness Training

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The National Football League has been confronting questions about head injuries and the danger of concussions among its players. But football is a contact sport beginning at a much younger age, and many states are implementing - or at least considering new policies - to protect student athletes from head injuries.

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Economy
9:39 am
Fri March 7, 2014

February Job Growth Beats Expectations; Jobless Rate Ticks Up

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It was pretty clear that the recent bout of winter weather that many of us have seen was going to have an effect on job growth in February. The question was how much. And it turns out less than expected. That's the message from the government's monthly employment report that's out today. It found that U.S. employers added 175,000 jobs to their payrolls last month. As NPR's John Ydstie reports, it's more than expected.

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Around the Nation
4:40 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Feds Break Up Multi-State Shoplifting Ring

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 9:39 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. A family business in Chicago folded this week because of the Fed. It was a mother father daughter shoplifting ring that went from Maryland to Texas. The family stole millions of dollars worth of retail - Legos, electronics, bags of coffee. They auctioned the items on eBay, making more than four million bucks over the past decade. The tool of their trade - clothing. The family's matriarch had a special black dress outfitted with compartments to stuff stolen goods.

Around the Nation
4:35 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Teen Enlists A Capella Group For Prom Invite

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 9:39 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Spring has not yet sprung but high schoolers are thinking ahead to prom. A Florida teen enlisted the a cappella group Straight No Chaser for his video invite to Megan.

STRAIGHT NO CHASER: (Singing) Let it go. Let it go...

UNIDENTIFIED BOY: Megan, will you go to prom with me?

(APPLAUSE)

WERTHEIMER: He showed the video in class. It's on YouTube. Megan said yes. Heaven knows he tried.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
4:13 am
Fri March 7, 2014

U.S. Knew Of 'Imminent' Move In Crimea, Top Official Says

Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee last month.
Lauren Victoria Burke AP

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 9:39 am

Senior U.S. officials were warned of imminent Russian military action in Crimea about a week before the troop movements that have sparked a major international crisis over Ukraine, the head of the Defense Intelligence Agency tells NPR.

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Books
3:00 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Publisher Releases Lullabies From 'Goodnight Moon' Author

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 9:39 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Goodnight stars. Good night air. Good night noises, everywhere.

A woman named Margaret Wise Brown wrote those words. And you probably recognize them. You've probably read them out loud many times. It's from her book, "Goodnight Moon." Margaret Wise Brown died in 1952. But much of what she wrote was never published, including her songs and poems.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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