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Arts/Life

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When playwright Sarah DeLappe was growing up, she loved war movies. So she decided to write a play that was like a war movie – but about girls soccer.

The Wolves opens at New York's Lincoln Center on Monday. As the lights come up, nine teenage girls are in a circle atop a green expanse of artificial turf, stretching before a match. And they're all talking at once.

John Banville has written a novel that is at once an epochal act of imitation, salutation and imagination. He's taken Isabel Archer, Henry James' protagonist in his 1881 novel The Portrait Of A Lady, and painted a portrait beyond that classic frame. The result is a sequel, Mrs. Osmond, in much of the manner of Henry James.

On a sunny weekday afternoon, chef Bonnie Morales leads me past the Q subway line in the Brighton Beach neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y. We are going shopping for Russian food.

Morales owns Kachka, a restaurant in Portland, Ore., that serves food from the former Soviet Union. It's one of the most popular places to eat in one of the hottest food cities in the country.

By day, Liz Climo works on the animated TV show The Simpsons, where she's a character artist and storyboard revisionist. Off the clock, she draws comics of cute animals with human aspirations — some of which have been gathered into children's books. Her latest is called Rory The Dinosaur Needs A Christmas Tree.

Given all the time she's spent illustrating members of the Simpson family, we thought we'd ask her about Jessica Simpson — the pop star.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is open now, after winning praise and prizes at film festivals in Toronto and Venice.

Hoaxes work when we want them to. These longings can be benign: think of Herman Rosenblat's beautiful, fake story about a girl who kept him alive by throwing apples over the fence of a concentration camp, and meeting her years later on a blind date. Who wouldn't want to believe a love story like that?

One of America's most coveted dining experiences is a 40-seat restaurant in a converted grist-mill in the rural village of Freedom, Maine.

Chef Erin French, who is self-taught, opened the Lost Kitchen in her hometown of Freedom without much of a plan. She loved the space, and at first thought she would make English muffins and offer brunch, not convinced that the village of just over 700 people could become a dinner destination.

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Hari Kondabolu is a Brooklyn-based standup comedian, the child of Indian immigrants, and a big fan of...

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UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) The Simpsons.

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Letters Witch

Nov 17, 2017

In this word game, contestants must identify a common two-word phrase, then move the first letter of the second word to the end of the first word to form a completely new phrase. Perfect for fans of wordplay, cruise ships, and Cruise's hips.

Heard On Mozhan Marnò: Diaries, Screenplays, And Blacklists

Actor and writer Mozhan Marnò started writing at a very young age, in a very serious place: her diary. She kept a journal between the ages of 8 and 22, then picked it up again ten years later. Her earliest entries, she told host Ophira Eisenberg, tended to focus on one theme in particular. "It was like, 'why I like John,' and then the next week it was like, 'pros and cons of John,' and then the next week it was like, 'why I hate John.'"

Say It With A Song

Nov 17, 2017

In this audio quiz, contestants must identify numbers from special musical episodes of non-musical TV shows. Not included: That 70s Musical!

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Closed Mondays

Nov 17, 2017

Welcome to the Museum of Ask Me Another Game Descriptions! In this game, contestants have to identify whether a museum we describe is real or fake.

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The In Crowd

Nov 17, 2017

If you want to win Ask Me Another, just channel the Arthur theme song and "Believe in Yourself." Case in point: We challenged our contestants to a final round in which every answer is a three-word phrase with the middle word "in."

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Mystery Guest

Nov 17, 2017

We spoke to Chloe Swantner, who practices an unusual craft. Can you solve the mystery before Ophira and Jonathan figure it out?

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Sounds Like Teen Spirit

Nov 17, 2017

Finally, a game that combines the glitz of bromocriptine with the glamour of phosphocreatine! We rewrote Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit" to be about other things that end with "teen."

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Simple Solutions

About Wendy Troxel's TED Talk

Sleep expert Wendy Troxel says teens are sleep-deprived because of early school start times that cater to adults. She says high schools should start classes at least an hour later.

About Wendy Troxel

We get a lot of movies about America's racist past, but Mudbound tackles a part of our history that its siblings tend to overlook: the Jim Crow South. Apart from The Color Purple, it can be tough to find a dramatic representation of black life from the time period. From a storytelling standpoint, Jim Crow was lacking in both the obvious visual shackles of slavery and the easy catharsis of Civil Rights victories, so you can see why filmmakers might not be so easily drawn to it: Mere bigotry, on its own, isn't "movie" enough.

A guy walks into an Alaska bar at night. The bar is called Chums, and his two pals are deep in heated discussion about an upcoming election and the fabulous age of business dominance to come in its wake. The dialogue is not played for winks at the audience, and Sweet Virginia is not, now or later, one of those jokey neo-noirs that keeps poking the genre in the ribs. Next thing you know, a stranger — young, good-looking, intense — comes in demanding the Early Bird Special.

At one point during Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond — Featuring a Very Special, Contractually Obligated Mention of Tony Clifton, a documentary about Jim Carrey and the making of Andy Kaufman biopic Man on the Moon, Carrey gets emotional when asked about his father. Carrey remembers his dad as the funniest person in the room and a brilliant saxophonist who gave up his musical ambitions in order to care for his family. Then he lost his job as an accountant at 51 and it broke him. He hadn't just failed to achieve his dreams. He failed at the compromise.

'Wonder': Why?

Nov 16, 2017

Life is hard for the Pullmans, the affluent Brooklyn family at the heart of the watchable but underachieving Wonder — or at least that's what this semi-comic weepie sets out to demonstrate. Yet the Pullmans' troubles, which stem from their youngest member's medical condition, turn out to be as superficial as the boy's disability.

'Justice League' Is Just OK

Nov 16, 2017

Howard Hawks, whose four-dozen-feature filmography didn't include a single superhero flick, had a formula for success: "Three great scenes and no bad ones." Justice League, the DC Comics movie-verse's inevitable all-star-charity-single-team-up catch-up movie, has at least three pretty good scenes and, um ... maybe we can just talk about those for a while. They're enough to average things out to roughly a C-grade B-movie wherein all involved fully satisfy their contractual obligations. Isn't that inspiring?

In 1963, Alfred Hitchcock had a huge amount of power in Hollywood. That's when he plucked actress Tippi Hedren from relative obscurity to star in his new movie, The Birds. It was a big break for Hedren.

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Last night, someone spent the most money in history on a work of art at Christie's auction house in New York.

JUSSI PYLKKANEN: Four-hundred million.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

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Actress Greta Gerwig has made a career starring in movies about quirky women. She played a driftless dancer in Frances Ha and a punk photographer in 20th Century Women. Now she's written and directed her first film, an exploration of mother-daughter relationships called Lady Bird.

"I don't know any woman who has a simple relationship with their mother or with their daughter," Gerwig says. "It has a tremendous amount of love — and a tremendous amount of angst."

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