Arts/Life

Author Interviews
3:11 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

Beyond The 'Sometimes Sentimental' Story Of Filipino Migrants

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 4:18 pm

Mia Alvar was born in the Philippines, but as a small child her family moved to Bahrain. A few years later, they moved again, this time to New York.

The cities of her childhood are the settings in her debut collection of short stories, In The Country. The nine stories feature very different characters, in and outside of the Philippines, who are grappling with some form of exile or emigration.

"Part of the project," she tells NPR's Arun Rath, "was getting behind the official, sometimes sentimental, narrative about overseas Filipino workers."

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Arts & Life
3:11 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

Remembering James Salter, A 'Writer's Writer' Who Died Friday

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 4:21 pm

The acclaimed U.S. author died in New York at age 90. A master of his craft, Salter never received the mainstream success many believe he deserved. His novels include A Sport and a Pastime and All That Is.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Sunday Puzzle
6:08 am
Sun June 21, 2015

A Mental Block May Help Solve This Puzzle

NPR

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 1:48 pm

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "Monkey Business." Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase starting with "M" and "B" — as in "monkey business."

Last week's challenge: Think of an adjective that describes many shampoos. Add the brand name of a shampoo in its basic form. The result, reading the letters in order from left to right, will name a famous musician. Who is it?

Answer: Herb Alpert.

Winner: Mark Dressner of Long Beach, Calif.

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Book News & Features
5:57 am
Sun June 21, 2015

A Boy And A Brutal Slaughter In 'Caminar'

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 8:26 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Book News & Features
5:03 am
Sun June 21, 2015

Words Made Flesh: Literature And The Language Of Prayer

Lately, my prayers have become a form of artistic expression: Carefully chosen words, praise reports like songs, and sometimes pissed-off pronouncements entwined with polite requests that I please not screw something up. This season of life has required thoughtful consideration of even my private devotional time — and that makes me think of the conviction of Flannery O'Connor.

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Author Interviews
3:40 am
Sun June 21, 2015

After Years Of Blackouts, A Writer Remembers What She 'Drank To Forget'

Emily Bogle Emily Bogle

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 11:34 am

When Sarah Hepola got her very first writing job at The Austin Chronicle, her editor-in-chief gave her an unlikely Christmas gift — a hat that could hold beers. "It was my top boss," Hepola recalls, who had drawn her name in a Secret Santa gift exchange. "He just threw it on my desk and said: 'So you can drink more at work.'"

Hepola's new memoir -- Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget -- is filled with such funny/tragic stories, about drinking until last call, blacking out, and then trying to piece it all together the following day.

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The Salt
3:39 am
Sun June 21, 2015

Do Try This At Home: Hacking Chicken Sous Vide

To make Christina Tosi's Bird in a Bag, you'll need a chicken breast or boneless thigh, seasoning, buttermilk (or even bottled ranch dressing), a heavy-duty zip-top freezer bag and a straw.
Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle NPR

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 12:28 pm

This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This At Home series, top chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen.

First up: making magically moist sous vide chicken without the fancy equipment.

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Author Interviews
3:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

From Civilian To Spy: How An Average Guy Helped Bust A Russian Agent

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 11:28 am

For years, Naveed Jamali gave secrets to the Russians, selling out his country for cash.

Or so the Russians thought. In fact, Jamali was working for the FBI by pretending to be a spy for the Russians: a real-life double agent.

Jamali chronicles his experiences in his new book, How To Catch A Russian Spy: The True Story of an American Civilian Turned Double Agent.

The story starts back when Jamali was a child. A well-dressed Russian man entered his parent's bookstore to buy some books.

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My Big Break
3:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

The Man Behind 'The Most Interesting Man' Is Interesting, Too

Jonathan Goldsmith plays "The Most Interesting Man in the World" in beer company Dos Equis' ad campaign.
Bobby Quillard Anderson Group Public Relations

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 11:42 am

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

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Music Interviews
3:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

'Lester, You Changed Our Lives': Channeling Bangs In 'How To Be a Rock Critic'

Erik Jensen portrays rock critic Lester Bangs in the new one-man play How to Be a Rock Critic.
Craig Schwartz

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 4:42 pm

In his 33 years on earth, rock critic Lester Bangs left behind tens of thousands of pages of writing. He died of a drug overdose in 1982 — but this month, at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City, Calif., Bangs and his ideas are coming to life on stage in the new one-man play How to Be a Rock Critic.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:59 am
Sat June 20, 2015

Not My Job: Mindy Kaling Gets Quizzed On Do-It-Yourself Projects

Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 9:05 am

Mindy Kaling started out as the youngest writer on the staff of NBC's The Office and ended up being a star, producer and director of the show. She went on to create her own sitcom, The Mindy Project and now, she's the voice of Disgust in the new Pixar movie, Inside Out.

Since Kaling was the star of The Mindy Project, we're going to ask her to play a game called "The Home Improvement Project" — three questions about do-it-yourself projects.

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Monkey See
6:03 am
Sat June 20, 2015

In 'Not A Game,' The Story Of A Star Player And A Hard Fall

Courtesy Atria Books

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Television
5:35 am
Sat June 20, 2015

HBO's 'The Brink' Puts The Situation Room In Situation Comedy

The Brink imagines how the White House situation room —€” and the U.S. secretary of state, played by Tim Robbins —€” respond when Pakistan is taken over by a certifiably crazy general.
Merie W. Wallace HBO

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 2:04 pm

HBO's new comedy The Brink refers to a world on the brink of nuclear warfare — possibly one of the least-funny premises imaginable. But the two brothers who created the show cut their teeth on a particular kind of political scripted satire that had its heyday in the 1960s and '70s. Think Dr. Strangelove, M*A*S*H and Network and other films by Paddy Chayefsky.

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Book News & Features
5:03 am
Sat June 20, 2015

Summer Of Love: Meet Our Expert Panelists!

Mary McLain

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 11:20 am

While our intern is diligently tallying up the 18,000 nominations that came in for the Summer of Love reader poll (sorry, Intern Laura!), we thought we'd take the time to introduce you to the expert panel that will help us wrestle this massive list down to 100 finalists.

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Author Interviews
3:52 am
Sat June 20, 2015

Survival Is Insufficient: 'Station Eleven' Preserves Art After The Apocalypse

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 8:40 am

Emily St. John Mandel's new novel, Station Eleven, opens with a vain actor — and is there really any other kind? — who dies of a heart attack onstage as he plays King Lear in Toronto. His co-stars can't remember if he had a family to notify. But soon, within minutes, the death of one man playing Lear disappears into the vast, mass death of a worldwide plague called the Georgia Flu.

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The Two-Way
2:34 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

After Verses Turn To Versus, Poet Emerges With Renowned Oxford Post

Simon Armitage frowns with dignity after being awarded the Commander of the British Empire medal at Buckingham Palace in 2010. Though he began the nomination process for the Oxford post as an underdog, he emerged from the ensuing drama with the professorship.
WPA Pool/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 3:47 pm

It's been a scuffle of candidate platforms, fickle endorsements and even a few dignified bouts of mud-slinging — and for once, the hubbub had nothing to do with American politics. In fact, it featured a cast of characters you might not have expected: those men and women of letters, the poets.

On Friday, British poet Simon Armitage won election as the newest Oxford professor of poetry. He edged out Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka and American poet A.E. Stallings.

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Monkey See
12:47 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

The Weird — Weirder? — Thing About The Ferrell-Wiig Lifetime Movie

This is the real promo art for a real Lifetime movie starring Kristen Wiig and Will Ferrell.
Lifetime

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Movie Reviews
11:26 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Pixar's 'Inside Out' Is A Mind-Opening Masterpiece

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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Author Interviews
11:26 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Jacqueline Woodson On Growing Up, Coming Out And Saying Hi To Strangers

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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Monkey See
8:59 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Why The Key Character In 'Inside Out' Is The One Who Isn't There

Riley is on her own in Inside Out.
Pixar

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 9:38 am

Villains are staples of stories for kids. Making them bigger, meaner, madder, more impossible to defeat — that's how you build the ideas of fear and then, inevitably, of courage. A small person faces a giant, or a witch, or a wolf, or Jafar, or Cruella De Vil, or the Buy 'N' Large, and by watching that happen, you learn. You learn what it takes to beat the bad guy. You learn that you, too, can beat the bad guy. You learn not to lose heart and not to give up. You use something inside yourself to beat something outside yourself.

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Monkey See
7:30 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Inside Out' And Moms And Dads In Love

Joy (Amy Poehler) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith) catch a ride on the Train of Thought in Disney and Pixar's Inside Out.
Pixar

I'm just going to tell you right off the bat, you guys: we really liked Inside Out. This does not exactly make us outliers in the critical landscape, but we sit down this week with the great Kat Chow of NPR's Code Switch team to talk about the film. It's a thought-provoking story and visually inventive, so we'll spend some time on the various creative forces at work. At the same time, we ding its one weak scene that unfortunately shows up in a lot of the trailers and we debate who cried the most.

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TED Radio Hour
6:36 am
Fri June 19, 2015

When Do We Become The Final Version of Ourselves?

"Human beings are works in progress that mistakenly think they're finished," says psychologist Dan Gilbert.
Ryan Lash Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 7:41 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Shifting Time

About Dan Gilbert's TED Talk

Psychologist Dan Gilbert shares research on what he calls the "end of history illusion," where we think the person we are right now is the person we'll be for the rest of time. Hint: that's not the case.

About Dan Gilbert

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TED Radio Hour
6:36 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Which Time Of Day Is Both Too Early And Too Late?

Poet Rives explores why 4 a.m. has become synonymous with the strangest hour of the day.
Bret Hartman Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 7:41 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Shifting Time

About Rives' TED Talk

Poet Rives explores why 4 in the morning has become popular shorthand for the strangest hour of the day.

About Rives

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TED Radio Hour
6:36 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Can You Remember Your Life 1 Second At A Time?

Cesar Kuriyama explains his app 1 Second Everyday at TED.
James Duncan Davidson Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 7:41 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Shifting Time

About Cesar Kuriyama's TED Talk

Director Cesar Kuriyama shoots one second of video every day as part of an ongoing project to remember the special moments of his life.

About Cesar Kuriyama

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Movie Interviews
3:03 am
Fri June 19, 2015

'Sadness Is Like A Superhero': Amy Poehler On Pixar's 'Inside Out'

"[Sadness is] such a funny opposite energy to Joy, who is literally jumping up and down," Poehler says. "And Sadness just wants to lie down and kind of feel her feelings." Poehler plays Joy (left) and Phyllis Smith plays Sadness in the new film Inside Out.
Disney/Pixar

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 10:37 am

A new animated feature from Pixar aims to do the near-impossible, as any parent would tell you: get inside the mind of a preteen girl. Inside Out is about an 11-year-old girl named Riley, but the real stars are her emotions — five colorful characters representing joy, sadness, anger, fear and disgust.

Pete Docter, the creative force behind Up and Monsters, Inc., wrote and directed the film, and actress Amy Poehler plays Joy. Both of them laugh about one of the biggest challenges of the movie: deciding how many emotions to include.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

One 'Overnight,' Two Couples, Countless Boundaries Violated

Adam Scott and Taylor Schilling in The Overnight.
John Geleserian The Orchard

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:31 pm

"I thought you wanted to loosen up," Charlotte (Judith Godrèche) asks Alex (Adam Scott) close to the end of Patrick Brice's The Overnight. "I do," Alex replies warily. "But I guess I'm just wondering what loosen up means at this point."

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

The House Music Of Paris Takes Center Stage In 'Eden'

Felix De Givry in Eden.
Broad Green Pictures

A subtle portrait of an EDM Adam, Eden is neither a star-is-born fable nor a soul-is-lost parable. In 1992, teenage Paul (Felix de Givry) gives his life to Paris' house-music scene. Two decades later, he reluctantly takes it back.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

From The 'Inside Out,' A Lively Look Inside A Young Mind

Fear (Bill Hader), Joy (Amy Poehler), and Disgust (Mindy Kaling).
Pixar

Pixar's Inside Out is the perfect tool for coming to grips with what has happened to Pixar itself. The film's most valuable insight is that it's natural to feel sad about growing up, which is true even when the thing growing up is a movie studio that has shepherded countless childhoods.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

Difficult Times With A Difficult Father In 'Infinitely Polar Bear'

Mark Ruffalo, Imogene Wolodarsky and Ashley Aufderheide in Infinitely Polar Bear.
Claire Folger Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 5:26 pm

Cam Stuart (Mark Ruffalo), the bipolar father of two at the center of Maya Forbes' amiable domestic comedy Infinitely Polar Bear, comes to us attired in a scarlet swimsuit with matching bandana as he bangs furiously on the window of a car containing his departing wife, Maggie (Zoe Saldana), and small daughters Amelia (Imogene Wolodarsky) and Faith (Ashley Aufderheide). When his family visits soon after, Cam is an institutionalized zombie, medicated to the gills, his weight ballooning from the side effects of Lithium.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

Kids' Art Show Takes Over 2 Billboards In Times Square

Who? by Sharon Yang, 10, a fifth-grader in Brooklyn. Of this work, she says: "I put a lot of effort in my artwork to make the texture on the tree and the feathers on the owl."
Isaak Liptzin WNYC

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 4:49 am

For the next few days, two large billboards in New York's Times Square are being given over to art created by the city's public school students. The project highlights students' work that's part of a new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

"Art is my favorite subject. It lets me see new things," artist and fifth-grader Sharon Yang told a crowd Wednesday, according to member station WNYC.

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