Arts/Life

TED Radio Hour
7:34 am
Fri June 6, 2014

How Does Henry Ford's Great-Grandson Envision The Future?

"This is the kind of technology that will merge millions of individual vehicles into a single system" — Bill Ford
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting There.

About Bill Ford's TEDTalk

Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford describes how we can create a green future of smart roads and smart cars.

About Bill Ford

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TED Radio Hour
7:34 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Is Space Tourism Finally About To Take Off?

"When the rocket stops, you will be in space, there will be complete silence, you will unbuckle, you will float around" — Richard Branson
Robert Leslie TED

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting There.

About Richard Branson's TEDTalk

Entrepreneur Richard Branson shares his vision for private, commercial space travel.

About Richard Branson

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TED Radio Hour
7:34 am
Fri June 6, 2014

How Do You Make New York's Mean Streets A Little Nicer?

"When you build it they will come — we've seen quadrupling of bike commuting in New York City since 2000" — Janette Sadik-Khan
Ryan Lash TED

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting There.

About Janette Sadik-Khan's TEDTalk

Former New York City Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan says cities can tackle the challenges of tomorrow by completely re-imagining our streets today.

About Janette Sadik-Khan

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TED Radio Hour
7:34 am
Fri June 6, 2014

If We Want to Live In Cities, Will We Have To Share Cars?

"If you live in a city and don't need a car to get to work, you're crazy to be owning one" — Robin Chase
Robert Leslie TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting There.

About Robin Chase's TEDTalk

Zipcar co-founder Robin Chase makes the case for car-sharing as the solution to global gridlock.

About Robin Chase

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Monkey See
7:21 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Seeing Books Everywhere And Moments Of Grief

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week's show brings back our friend Petra Mayer of NPR Books. Like me, Petra is fresh off a trip to Book Expo America (a/k/a BEA, FYI), where we both heard about a whole lot of new books. We'll mention some of the titles (though in many cases we haven't actually received the books yet), and we'll try to give you a sense of how this enormous trade show followed by a fan event actually works.

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Author Interviews
2:20 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Wait A Second ... Is That Hitchhiker John Waters?

Filmmaker John Waters recently hitchhiked across America and said it reaffirmed his belief in the goodness of people.
Jason Kempin Getty Images for EJAF

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 3:23 am

A couple of years ago, film director and writer John Waters decided to hitchhike alone from his Baltimore home to his apartment in San Francisco — and see what happened. The so-called Pope of Trash — the man behind the films Pink Flamingos and Cry-Baby — managed to get many rides — 21 in all. He chronicles his cross-country adventure in a new book called Carsick.

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NPR Ed
6:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

A Diverse #SummerReading List For Kids

Ruby in Ruby's Wish is a determined protagonist any boy or girl can learn from.
Courtesy of Lara Starr

In children's books, it can be easier to find talking pandas than characters of color.

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Movie Reviews
4:23 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

A Lively 'Tomorrow,' Lived Over And Over

Tom Cruise as Maj. William Cage, a soldier who's woefully unprepared for battle, in Edge of Tomorrow.
Warner Brothers Pictures

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 11:14 am

It's rarely a compliment to say that a movie is video game-like. That's usually shorthand for effects-heavy, narratively lightweight, CGI shoot'em-ups. Don't get me wrong: Edge of Tomorrow has no shortage of big effects set pieces, a lot of invading aliens getting shot at, and the seemingly ageless Tom Cruise performing death-defying acts on a battlefield. Except that he doesn't defy death, and that's where the film borrows an important quality of video games to anchor its story: Death is never the end.

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Movie Reviews
3:33 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Bringing A Book Phenomenon To The Screen, With Sadly Ordinary Results

Hazel (Shailene Woodley) and Gus (Ansel Elgort) take on a variety of challenges in The Fault in Our Stars.
James Bridges Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:56 pm

Josh Boone's The Fault in Our Stars is the kind of careful, listless adaptation that makes a critic want to rave at length about the wonderful novel on which it's based.

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Movie Reviews
3:23 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Seeing The 1980s Twice Over, But Done Better With Dance

Scott Marlowe in Test.
Variance Films

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:00 pm

A Run-DMC tape. A boom box. A pair of Nike sneakers and bright red tracksuit pants. These are the objects that we see in the opening shot of Ping Pong Summer, the cultural markers that would clearly peg the film to a particular decade even without a subtitle further specifying the year: 1985.

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Movie Reviews
3:08 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

All Eyes Turn To One 'Beauty' In Interwoven Tales Of Families And Politics

Isabelle Huppert in Dormant Beauty.
Emerging Pictures

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 11:45 am

Four stories and at least that many themes interlace in Dormant Beauty, veteran Italian director Marco Bellocchio's latest bid to combine the personal and the political. The central issue is euthanasia, which became a national argument in 2009, when the father of Eluana Englaro asked to end her life after 17 years in a vegetative state.

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Theater
2:56 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

In Leap From Page To Stage, UK's Take On 'Catch-22' Gets It Right

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Catch-22 is widely considered a great novel; until now, it has been a disaster as a play. Though Joseph Heller adapted his work for the stage decades ago, every production had been a failure. Now, however, a new production of his play seems to have broken the curse: It is touring the UK and receiving strong reviews.

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Sports
1:35 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

For Jockey Donna Barton Brothers, Horse Racing Runs In The Family

Brothers rides down the front stretch before the 88th Black-Eyed Susan Stakes at Pimlico Race Course on May 18, 2012, in Baltimore.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

When the thoroughbreds burst out of the starting gate at the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, fans will have their eyes on California Chrome as a potential Triple Crown winner. And there to interview the winner on horseback will be Donna Barton Brothers, an analyst for NBC Sports.

Before she was an analyst, Brothers had a distinguished career as a jockey, winning more than 1,100 races before retiring in 1998. When she retired, Brothers tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, she knew it was time to get out in part because it started to feel dangerous.

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Theater
1:19 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

1936 'Show Boat': A Multiracial, Musical Melodrama, Now Out On DVD

Allan Jones plays debonair leading man Gaylord Ravenal and Irene Dunne is the enchanting Magnolia in the 1936 film version of Show Boat, which has just been released on DVD.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Digital Distribution

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 7:32 am

Broadway had never seen anything like it when Show Boat arrived at the Ziegfeld Theatre in 1927. The score was unforgettable and the story tackled complex racial issues. There have been three movie versions, but the best one — James Whale's 1936 production — has only just been released on DVD.

Show Boat was the first great serious Broadway musical. Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II, who wrote the songs, and Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., who produced it, departed from typical musical comedy material, with its chorus lines and songs showcasing star performers.

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Arts & Life
10:57 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Couple Goes High-Tech And Low Cost For Their Big Day

Putting on a wedding in New York City can be financial suicide. But one young couple, profiled in Fast Company, say they priced their upcoming celebration at just $10,000 by using online startups.

Books
10:50 am
Thu June 5, 2014

'Guns Kept People Alive' During The Civil Rights Movement

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:10 pm

This year marks the 50th anniversary of many pivotal events in the civil rights movement, and to commemorate "Freedom Summer," Tell Me More is diving into books that explore that theme.

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Music
10:50 am
Thu June 5, 2014

With 'So Much Trouble In The World,' Music Calms Theater Director

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to end today with a regular feature we call In Your Ear. That's where we invite some of our guests to tell us about some of the top songs on their playlist. Today we hear from a Brit in Baltimore. Award-winning playwright and actor, Kwame Kwei-Armah, is the artistic director of Baltimore Centerstage Theater. When we caught up with him to talk about making a life, and making art across the pond, he also shared the music that helps him relax from the rigors of the transatlantic life.

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Monkey See
7:40 am
Thu June 5, 2014

The Muscle-Flexing, Mind-Blowing Book Girls Will Inherit The Earth

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 8:14 am

The first ever BookCon, planned as an extension of the mega trade show Book Expo America by the same people who do Comic-Con, took place last weekend. It was headlined by, among other things, a robust diversity debate that bloomed on social media around the hashtag #WeNeedDiverseBooks. But it also functioned as an impressive, invigorating show of force for one of the most important nascent cultural interest groups we have: the Book Girls.

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Europe
5:53 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Cave-Dwelling In Spain Offers A Welcome Inconvenience

Cave dwellings, inhabited for centuries, are perched on hillsides in Spain's Granada province.
LOOK Die Bildagentur der Fotogra Alamy

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 11:13 am

Have you ever fantasized about getting away from it all — going somewhere without smartphones, computers or Twitter?

Tuning out from technology can be challenging, but for the truly daring, there is an even more radical solution. In southern Spain, thousands of people live completely unplugged — in caverns.

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The Two-Way
5:05 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Book News: Experimental Debut Novel Wins Prestigious Baileys Prize

Eimear McBride won the 2014 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction for her debut novel, A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing. The novel was rejected by publishers for almost a decade.
Stuart C. Wilson Getty Images for Baileys/Diageo

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 9:03 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Suspense Along The Sepik With The Young Scientists Of 'Euphoria'

Lily King's fourth novel (after the award-winning Father of the Rain) was inspired by a moment in 1933 when the lives of three young anthropologists — Margaret Mead and her second and third husbands, Reo Fortune and Gregory Bateson — intersected along the Sepik River in New Guinea. Using this as a point of departure, and changing the actual story line drastically, King weaves together the tale of a tragic love triangle and an exhilarating description of three rivals working to shape a new social science discipline.

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Movie Interviews
1:31 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Film Critic Kenneth Turan Picks 54 Films That Are 'Not To Be Missed'

The 1950 film Sunset Boulevard, starring Gloria Swanson and William Holden, is one of the 54 movies Kenneth Turan says should not be missed.
CinemaPhoto Corbis

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 10:40 am

You normally hear Los Angeles Times and Morning Edition film critic Kenneth Turan reviewing new movies, but this week, we're talking about old films with him instead. That's because he's written a new book called Not to Be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film. In it, he offers up tidbits of Hollywood history and behind-the-scenes drama, as well as his critical analysis of some of the world's greatest movies — some familiar, some obscure.

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Author Interviews
1:30 am
Thu June 5, 2014

John Green's 'Stars' Shines Bright On The Silver Screen

Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort play the cancer-stricken lovers in The Fault in Our Stars.
Temple Hill Entertainment

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 10:40 am

It's a writer's fantasy. You author a book. It hits the young adult jackpot. It sells 10 million copies. Hollywood actors fight for parts in the movie.

Welcome to John Green's reality. Not too long ago, in New York City, he introduced a screening of the film based on his novel, The Fault in Our Stars, to an audience of hundreds of teenagers ecstatically screaming his name. They cried copiously throughout the film, which follows a romance between two teenagers with cancer.

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Movies
2:08 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

'Nerdfighters' Mobilize For Film Premiere, Armed With Favorite Lines

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

John Green's love story, The Fault in Our Stars, is a cult classic for young readers. The film adaptation comes out Friday, and excitement has reached a fever pitch among middle-schoolers obsessed with the book.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Law
1:28 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

'Burning Down The House' Makes The Case Against Juvenile Incarceration

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 2:57 pm

The American rate of juvenile incarceration is seven times that of Great Britain, and 18 times that of France. It costs, on average, $88,000 a year to keep a youth locked up — far more than the U.S. spends on a child's education.

But the biggest problem with juvenile incarceration, author Nell Bernstein tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, is that instead of helping troubled kids get their lives back on track, detention usually makes their problems worse, and sets them in the direction of more crime and self-destructive behavior.

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Theater
9:26 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Anika Noni Rose Breathes New Life Into Classic 'Raisin In The Sun'

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 11:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now you may think you know the play "A Raisin In The Sun" from its many stage and screen performances, but the latest revival starring Denzel Washington, Sophie Okonedo and Anika Noni Rose is bringing new life into the American classic. The production has already received five Tony Award nominations, including one for Anika Noni Rose's performance as the spirited, aspiring doctor, Beneatha Younger.

(SOUNDBITE OF PLAY, "A RAISIN IN THE SUN")

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Book Reviews
5:43 am
Wed June 4, 2014

'Night Heron' And 'The Director' Provide A Double Shot Of Intrigue

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 8:39 am

I suppose it's preaching to the converted to announce that David Ignatius has done it again. But here he is, having written yet another deeply engaging spy thriller, rooted at that point where the intricacies of the intelligence community and the everyday world of civilians converge. However, it's a reviewer's duty to point out some fascinating new turns in the man's work — in particular, the highlighting of Internet communications as a source of secret information over the conventional collection of data in the field, and the actual manipulation of events by means of writing code.

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Author Interviews
3:36 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

From Lunch (n.) To Balding (adj.), Some Words Are Just 'Bad English'

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 9:02 pm

Ammon Shea, author of Reading the OED, has just come out with a new book about words — words like "dilapidated," "balding" and "lunch." Shea says those words were once frowned upon, as were more than 200 other words he has compiled.

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Movie Interviews
2:08 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

In 'Night Moves,' Filmmaker Dredges The Tension That Lives In Quiet

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 6:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Director Kelly Reichardt's films live between the spaces of words unsaid. Her body of work includes "Wendy And Lucy," "Meek's Cutoff" and "Old Joy." All of her films are marked with deliberate pacing and sparse dialogue, with the Pacific Northwest as their backdrop.

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Book Reviews
2:08 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Book Review: 'The Director' and 'Night Heron'

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 6:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Now, two new spy novels, both written by journalists - one by an old hand of the genre, Washington Post columnist David Ignatius - the other by a first-time novelist, Adam Brookes at the BBC. Alan Cheuse has our reviews.

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