Arts/Life

Media
1:36 am
Wed August 15, 2012

The Next Frontier In TV: English News For Latinos

Millions of Americans rely on Univision anchor Jorge Ramos to tell them about the news, but his children aren't among them. Like many Latinos who've grown up in the U.S., they get their news in English.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 10:15 am

This is the third in a three-part series about major American networks trying to appeal to a broader Latino audience.

Jorge Ramos has a humbling problem.

He is one of the best-known Hispanics in the U.S. and a respected news anchor for the Univision networks on which millions of Americans routinely rely.

And yet, in Ramos' telling, his 14-year-old son, Nicolas, and his 25-year-old daughter, Paola, don't watch his newscasts.

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Kitchen Window
12:39 am
Wed August 15, 2012

Travel The World Through Portuguese Cooking

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 9:58 am

It was day 12 of our trip through Spain and Portugal, and my friend and I were ready for some traditional Portuguese cooking when we arrived in the quaint, cobblestoned city of Lisbon.

Walking along the tiered and winding roads, the Atlantic Ocean horizon would greet us and then disappear again behind the hilltops. Above, clothes hung out to dry along white, curved iron balconies, a rainbow of clips holding the waving pants or undergarments in place.

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Movie Interviews
12:28 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Julie Delpy, Keeping It Real In '2 Days In New York'

Julie Delpy stars in 2 Days in New York, which she also directed, produced and co-wrote.
Jojo Whilden Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 11:07 am

Actress Julie Delpy first beguiled American audiences in 1995, playing the enigmatic French student in Richard Linklater's film Before Sunrise. Ever since, Delpy has enjoyed life on the Hollywood fringe, preferring indie projects where she can help shape her roles.

She co-wrote the Oscar-nominated script to Linklater's sequel, Before Sunset, and has also begun directing her own projects. For her latest, 2 Days in New York, she directed, produced and helped write the script.

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Author Interviews
11:03 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Climate 'Weirdness' Throws Ecosystems 'Out Of Kilter'

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the past year through June 2012 has been the hottest year in the continental U.S. since modern record-keeping started in 1895. Above, New Yorkers flocked to Coney Island to try to beat the heat in early August.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 11:47 am

Science journalist Michael Lemonick doesn't want to be a doomsday prophet, but he does want to be realistic about the threat of climate change. "Since I started writing about climate change all the way back in 1987, we've known what the cause is, we've known what the likely outcome is, and we've had time to act — and essentially we haven't acted," he tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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The Picture Show
10:56 am
Tue August 14, 2012

A Dark Chapter Of American History Captured In 'Colors'

Young women wearing kimonos chat during an Obon celebration honoring ancestors at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center in Wyoming.
Bill Manbo Courtesy of Takao Bill Manbo/University of North Carolina Press

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 1:00 pm

They look like vacation photos at first glance. Women in flowery kimonos gossip together in a circle. A boy on ice skates takes his first steps on a crowded rink. Two sumo wrestlers share a chuckle in the ring as a crowd watches on.

But behind the smiles, the same shadowy presence looms in the background: the tar paper barracks that housed the thousands of Japanese-American prisoners of the Heart Mountain Relocation Center in Wyoming.

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Arts & Life
9:30 am
Tue August 14, 2012

With Ryan's Ascent, A Few Thoughts On 'Entitlement'

Rep. Paul Ryan has made changes to social safety net programs like Medicare and Social Security — often called "entitlements" — a key part of his political agenda.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 1:27 pm

People are saying that Mitt Romney's selection of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate creates an opportunity to hold what Ryan likes to call an "adult conversation" about entitlement spending. In the present political climate, it would be heartening to have an adult conversation about anything. But bear in mind that "entitlement" doesn't put all its cards on the table. Like a lot of effective political language, it enables you to slip from one idea to another without ever letting on that you've changed the subject.

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Arts & Life
9:10 am
Tue August 14, 2012

An Inner-City School With Gallery-Like Halls

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 10:13 am

Chicago's Dixon School looks more like an African-American art gallery than a public school. In the largely black blue-collar neighborhood of Chatham, a school where art plays a central role in the lives of students is a rarity. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with director Pamela Sherrod Anderson about her documentary, The Curators of Dixon School.

Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Screwball Satire With A Warm Heart In 'Bernadette'

What happens when a talented, Type A, hyperachieving woman married to an even more successful man quits working? In former television writer Maria Semple's experience — which she's channeled into her first two novels — the mood swings, loss of bearings, and toxic dissatisfaction aren't pretty, though she plays them for laughs.

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Media
2:07 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Eyeing Latinos, NBC News Snuggles Up To Telemundo

Telemundo anchor and reporter Jose Diaz-Balart made a notable, if fleeting, appearance during NBC's Republican primary debate last summer. This past June, NBC News and Telemundo announced they would be collaborating on the rest of their 2012 election coverage.
Steve Mitchell AP

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 7:47 am

This is the second in a three-part series about major American networks trying to appeal to a broader Latino audience.

Every morning at 11:45, NBC News officials hold a conference call with their counterparts at sister networks to sort through stories of interest. Among those on the line are executives at CNBC, MSNBC and The Weather Channel; digital news editors; and executives at Telemundo, a Spanish-language broadcast network.

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Author Interviews
1:32 am
Tue August 14, 2012

In The 'Shadow' Of Death, Stories Survive

Vaddey Ratner's novel is derived from her own experiences — she spent four years of her youth working in forced labor under the Khmer Rouge.
Kristina Sherk Simon & Schuster

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 3:00 am

When she was just 5 years old, Vaddey Ratner's comfortable and protected life as the child of an aristocratic Cambodian family came to an abrupt end, as Khmer Rouge soldiers entered the capital, Phnom Penh. They banged on the gates of the family compound and ordered them to leave — it was the start of the Khmer Rouge reign of terror, which left hundreds of thousands of Cambodians dead, including all of Ratner's family except her mother.

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Reporter's Notebook
1:29 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Through Thick And Thin, Simmons Still 'Sweatin'

Fitness advocate Richard Simmons, wearing his signature shorts and tank top, leads Capitol Hill staff and visitors through an exercise routine July 24, 2008, in Washington, D.C.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 3:20 pm

NPR producer Sam Sanders headed to Beverly Hills, Calif., recently to see longtime fitness guru Richard Simmons in action and find out how he has been at it so long. He sent this reporter's notebook of his encounter with the man who's been helping people lose weight for nearly 40 years.

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Monkey See
3:00 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Ten Fall Shows That Need More Sharks

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 4:32 pm

I'm sure you've already noticed — from the parades, the fact that your mail hasn't been arriving, and the way everyone gets the week off of work — but this is Shark Week, when the Discovery Channel generates a week of shark-themed programming. (Tonight: Sharkzilla, which is, surprisingly enough, not a SyFy movie, and the Mythbusters shark special.) (Trivia: Did you know the decorative shark that is traditionally displayed on or near Discovery's Silver Spring, Md. headquarters to celebrate this special week is named "Chompy"?

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Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!
3:00 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Sandwich Monday: Bacon S'Mores

Bacon s'mores.
NPR

A recipe for bacon s'mores has been making its way around the Internet today, prompting many people to wonder how they hadn't thought of it before. It was probably like this when a caveman first figured out the wheel and put something about it on his blog.

Robert: I feel really sorry for the pig who was excited about being invited to a campfire.

Ian: He's like "wait ... you're putting s'me in them?"

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Remembrances
2:38 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

'Cosmo' Editor Helen Gurley Brown Dies At 90

When Helen Gurley Brown took the reins at Cosmo in 1965, it was a foundering monthly known for fiction. She remained at the helm for more than 30 years. Here, Brown poses at her office in New York in September 1985.
G. Paul Burnett AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 3:22 pm

Helen Gurley Brown, the longtime editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, died Monday in New York at age 90.

If Cosmo was her biggest legacy, it was her 1962 best-seller, Sex and the Single Girl, that launched her to fame. She was 40, with a high-paying job in advertising and a recent marriage to Hollywood producer David Brown.

But she was writing for the single girls, not her privileged peers, says Jennifer Scanlon, author of a Brown biography called Bad Girls Go Everywhere.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
2:03 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Wicked And Delicious: Devouring Roald Dahl

cover detail

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 4:09 pm

D.W. Gibson is the author of Not Working: People Talk About Losing a Job and Finding Their Way in Today's Changing Economy.

The bright white Heritage Park library opened up a mile from my house when I was 13, and the first thing I checked out was Roald Dahl's story collection Someone Like You. I should have known what I was in for because of that giant eyeball on the cover; but somehow I saw it as more of a temptation than a warning.

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The Salt
1:40 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

From A British King To Rock 'N Roll: The Slippery History Of Eel Pie Island

F. Cooke's, one of the few remaining places to get eel pie in London.
Davia Nelson NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:59 am

We were in London, searching for Hidden Kitchen stories, when we came upon an Eel Pie & Mash shop. It was full of old white marble tables, tile walls, pots of stewed and jellied eels, and piles of pies. These shops are now a dying breed, along with the eels they serve. Our search for the source of these vanishing eels led us to southwest London — to Eel Pie Island, a tiny slice of land with a flamboyant history that stretches from Henry the VIII to the Rolling Stones.

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Monkey See
12:23 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Comics Legend Joe Kubert, 1926-2012: An Appreciation

Cover of 1969's DC Special #5, featuring Joe Kubert
DC Comics

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 7:33 am

Yesterday morning the comics medium lost one of its greatest creators, and one of its most influential teachers, with the passing of Joe Kubert.

Comics historian Mark Evanier posted a remembrance that highlights how warmly the man was regarded in the comics community — and how astonishgly quickly he worked.

Comic Book Resources has posted 25 of his classic comic covers; go look.

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Author Interviews
10:51 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Looking To The 'Stars' For A Reason To Live

iStockphoto.com

When Peter Heller sat down to work on his first novel, all he knew was that he wanted to have the experience of writing without knowing the ending. As an expedition kayaker, Heller was already the author of many works of travel and outdoor-adventure writing. With his debut novel, The Dog Stars, Heller returned to fiction — his first love. But as the novel took a post-apocalyptic turn, he found himself relying on his real-life scrapes and survival skills.

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Monkey See
10:27 am
Mon August 13, 2012

'Stars Earn Stripes': It's Offensive, But At Least It's Boring

Terry Crews is one of eight celebrities supposedly getting a taste of military life in Stars Earn Stripes.
Chris Haston NBC

The fact that NBC's new reality show Stars Earn Stripes is kind of an offensive concept should not distract you from the fact that it's stultifyingly boring as television and badly designed as a reality-competition show.

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Remembrances
9:56 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Al Freeman Jr. Remembered For Soaps To Spike Lee

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Now, from Olympic legacies to Hollywood legacies, we want to take a moment to pay tribute to a pioneer actor and director, Al Freeman, Jr. Freeman is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Nation of Islam leader, Elijah Muhammad in Spike Lee's 1992 epic film "Malcolm X." Freeman's performance won him an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Motion Picture.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "MALCOLM X")

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Television
9:56 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Hardcore Job Program Helps Unlikely 'Get To Work'

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we get the cross-cultural flavor of New Orleans music with writer and radio host, Gwen Thompkins. She talks to songwriters, musicians and producers in Louisiana for her program, Music Inside Out, and she shares their stories with us in just a few more minutes.

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My Guilty Pleasure
5:03 am
Mon August 13, 2012

You'd Have To Be Psycho To Not Pass This 'Test'

Carol Rifka Brunt is author of Tell the Wolves I'm Home.

There's this moment in Jon Ronson's book The Psychopath Test that caught me completely off guard. It comes a little less than halfway through, shortly after he's outlined the 20-point psychopath checklist. I'd read through the list and although most didn't really apply to me there were a handful that gave me pause: "Item 3: ... proneness to boredom," "Item 13: Lack of realistic long-term goals," "Item 15: Irresponsibility."

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Crime In The City
1:28 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Sleuthing Through The Shadows In Sunny Honolulu

For author Victoria Kneubuhl, the lost world of old Hawaii casts a long shadow. But through her writing, she says, readers can see that world again.
Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 2:23 am

Honolulu, on the lush, green island of Oahu, is paradise for surfers and sunbathers — but author Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl sets her mysteries in a darker, more sinister version of the tourist mecca.

"I think that juxtaposition between things that are horrible and terrible happening in a beautiful setting adds a lot of tension and depth to things," she tells NPR's Renee Montagne.

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Author Interviews
3:51 am
Sun August 12, 2012

This Election Season, Vote 'Sneaky Pie For President'

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Best-selling author Rita Mae Brown, pictured here in 1993, is know for her "Sister" Jane and Mrs. Murphy mystery series.
Wyatt Counts AP

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 8:34 am

There are many election-related books you could choose to help you endure the final months of the presidential race, from desk-pounding policy proposals to thick, shelf-crushing biographies.

Or, you could turn to Sneaky Pie.

Now, full disclosure, Sneaky Pie is a cat, and she's usually solving mysteries as the main character in Rita Mae Brown's bestselling Mrs. Murphy series.

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'Weekend Edition's' Taste Of Summer
3:51 am
Sun August 12, 2012

Summer Wine: Look For Light, Bright And Affordable

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 7:40 am

Before the summer slips away, we raise a glass to hot August nights — and their perfect wine pairings. A good summer wine will be "light, bright and affordable," Leslie Sbrocco, author of The Simple and Savvy Wine Guide, tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer.

Whether you're on the beach, on the go or at the grill, Sbrocco offers recommendations for affordable reds and whites under $25.

When You're On The Go ...

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Americandy: Sweet Land Of Liberty
3:51 am
Sun August 12, 2012

Chukar Cherries Offers A Year-Round Taste Of Summer

Chukar Cherries uses 250,000 pounds of cherries annually in its candies and other treats. The company dries them all over just a few weeks each summer.
Melisa Goh NPR

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 10:01 pm

Over the course of just a few sun-soaked weeks every summer, Chukar Cherries in central Washington state dries 250,000 pounds of fresh cherries.

"It's almost like going into your mom's kitchen and she's just taken a cherry pie out of the oven," says co-owner J.T. Montgomery. "A little bit like that."

Not surprisingly, the dried fruit goes into lots of Chukar Cherries' products, including the company's most popular: chewy, semi-dried cherries, rolled in oval nuggets of chocolate.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:54 pm
Sat August 11, 2012

In The End, There Will Be Chemistry

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 7:40 am

On-air challenge: You are given the ends of the names of three things that are all in the same category. You name the category. For example, "fur," "dine" and "sten" are all ends of chemical elements (sulfur, iodine, tungsten).

Last week's challenge, from listener Annie Haggenmiller of Chimacum, Wash.: Take the name of a well-known U.S. city in four syllables. The first and last syllables together name a musical instrument, and the two interior syllables name a religious official. What is the city?

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Pop Culture
1:59 pm
Sat August 11, 2012

Misadventures In Reporting: My Brush With Bieber

Justin Bieber was raised in Stratford, Ontario. When he returned to the town and played at his old busking spot outside the Avon Theatre, NPR's Bob Mondello was sitting six blocks away, oblivious.
Brendon Thorne Getty Images

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Books
12:36 pm
Sat August 11, 2012

Batman's Biggest Secret (No, It's Not Bruce Wayne)

Bill Finger (left) helped create the Batman we know today, including his iconic costume, his tragic backstory, and many of his adversaries.
Ty Templeton

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 2:41 pm

Batman has many secrets — the best-known one, of course, being his millionaire alter ego, Bruce Wayne. But that may not be the Dark Knight's biggest secret.

Since the 1930s, only one man has been given credit for creating the caped crusader and his home city of Gotham. Bob Kane's name appears in the credits of all the movies, the campy TV show and the associated merchandise, from video games and action figures to sheets and underwear.

But what if Bob Kane didn't do it all by himself?

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Author Interviews
12:03 am
Sat August 11, 2012

'This Will End In Tears': Soundtracks For Down Days

HarperCollins

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 1:31 pm

Even the strongest among us get the blues: You can't get out of bed, you don't want to talk to a single other humanoid, and you just want to close the curtains and turn on the music. The songs you choose for those miseries have to be just right.

Adam Brent Houghtaling is something of a connoisseur of the melancholy moment. Perhaps to cheer himself up, he's put that expertise to use by producing a kind of encyclopedia of the best soundtracks for lonely days and nights. It's called This Will End in Tears: The Miserablist Guide to Music.

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