Arts/Life

Author Interviews
4:35 am
Sun November 4, 2012

'Richard Burton Diaries' Unveil A Theatrical Life

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Richard Burton was one of the most acclaimed actors of his time.

(SOUNDBITE OF PLAY, "RICHARD BURTON'S HAMLET")

RICHARD BURTON: (as Hamlet) Frailty they name is woman. A little month, or ere those shoes were old with which she followed my poor father's body. Like Niobe, all tears. Why she, even she...

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Movies
3:08 am
Sun November 4, 2012

'SEAL Team' Film Adds Drama To Bin Laden Raid

A still image from a clip of the National Geographic Channel's SEAL Team Six. The film, which depicts the events leading up to the raid that killed Osama bin Laden, premieres Sunday night.
The National Geographic Channel

Originally published on Sun November 4, 2012 10:08 am

The story of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden has captured the imagination of authors and film directors.

Just this year, the mission carried out by Navy SEAL Team Six has already been re-told in three books, including one written by a former Navy SEAL. Acclaimed film director Katherine Bigelow, who directed the film The Hurt Locker, is getting ready to release her treatment of the bin Laden raid in December.

On Sunday night, the National Geographic Channel will air its film about the raid, SEAL Team Six: The Raid on Osama bin Laden.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat November 3, 2012

What's In A Name?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sat November 10, 2012 4:12 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer today consists of the names of two famous people. The last name of the first person is an anagram of the first name of the last person. Given the nonanagram parts of the names, you identify the people.

Example: Madeleine ________ Aaron.

Answer: Madeleine KAHN and HANK Aaron

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:12 pm
Sat November 3, 2012

The Movie RZA Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Clint Eastwood in a scene from Sergio Leone's film The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 3, 2012 3:36 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Books
5:03 am
Sat November 3, 2012

6 Book Stories That'll Cast The Election In New Light

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 1:43 pm

With plenty of election ennui going around, NPR Books dug into the archives for new ways to look at the election story. Here you'll find accounts of past campaigns gone wrong, an examination of the science and art of prediction and an idea of what happens when the pre-presidential storyline gets a dose of sci fi, fantasy and puberty, respectively.

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Fine Art
3:17 am
Sat November 3, 2012

The Story Of Steadman, Drawn From His 'Gonzo' Art

Among his many accomplishments, Ralph Steadman illustrated Hunter S. Thompson's 1971 novel, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, about a journalist's reporting trip turned hallucinogenic bender.
Courtesy of Itch Film

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 7:36 am

Every morning, British illustrator Ralph Steadman wakes up in his country estate in rural England and attacks a piece of paper, hurling ink, blowing paint through a straw and scratching away layers to reveal lines and forms that surprise even him.

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Author Interviews
3:16 am
Sat November 3, 2012

Nick, Nora (And Asta) Return In 'Thin Man' Novellas

Myrna Loy and William Powell (and a wire-haired terrier) starred as Nick and Nora Charles (and Asta) in the 1934 film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's The Thin Man.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sun November 4, 2012 12:33 pm

Dashiell Hammett's The Thin Man invented a new kind of crime fiction. It was hard-boiled, but also light-hearted; funny, with a hint of homicide. Nick and Nora Charles — and Asta, their wire-haired terrier — were rich, witty and in love, when America was in the middle of the Depression. They also drank a lot — Nick and Nora, not Asta, though he got an occasional leftover slurp.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:38 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

Smithsonian's Wayne Clough Plays Not My Job

Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sat November 3, 2012 9:31 am

The Smithsonian Institution is often called The Nation's Attic, because of all the treasures crammed into it ... which makes Wayne Clough, secretary of the Smithsonian, the crazy guy up in the attic collecting everything.

Since Clough is in charge of the nation's stuff that's worth keeping we've decided to quiz him on the stuff that isn't — turns out people are hoarding stuff so weird, even A&E wouldn't think to broadcast it.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
1:16 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

How 'Black Beauty' Changed The Way We See Horses

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 9:45 pm

NPR's Backseat Book Club is back! And we begin this round of reading adventures with a cherished classic: Black Beauty by Anna Sewell. Generations of children and adults have loved this book. With vivid detail and simple, yet lyrical prose, Black Beauty describes both the cruelty and kindness that an ebony-colored horse experiences through his lifetime — from the open pastures in the English countryside to the cobblestone grit of 19th-century England.

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Animals
11:09 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Animal Stage Trainer Makes Stars Out Of Pound Pups

Bill Berloni was responsible for making sure that chihuahua Bruiser could both bend and snap in the Broadway production of Legally Blonde.
Paul Kolnik

This interview was originally broadcast on Fresh Air on July 18, 2008.

A new revival of the hit musical Annie is now in previews on Broadway, scheduled to open Thursday. In the new production, the canine co-star Sandy is played by "Sunny," who has an understudy named "Casey." Bill Berloni trained them both — and, like the original Sandy in the original Broadway show, those dogs, too, were rescue dogs, found in animal shelters.

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Theater
11:00 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Past is Present in 'An Enemy Of The People'

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:40 am

Although it was written in 1882, Henrik Ibsen's play An Enemy of the People still resonates today. Richard Thomas and Boyd Gaines, the stars of a new production of the play, join Ira Flatow to talk about the play's themes of power and truth, and the role of whistle-blowers.

Author Interviews
10:50 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Rin Tin Tin: A Silent Film Star On Four Legs

Susan Orlean is a staff writer for the New Yorker and has contributed articles to Vogue, Rolling Stone and Esquire. She is the author of several books, including The Orchid Thief.
Gasper Tringale

This interview originally aired on Fresh Air on Jan. 9, 2012. Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend is now out in paperback.

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Movie Reviews
4:27 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

'The Details': Dirty Doings In A Stepford Suburb

Nealy and Jeff Lang (Elizabeth Banks and Tobey Maguire) struggle with infidelity, secrets, guilt and a raccoon problem in The Details.
Jan Cook Radius-TWC

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:28 pm

The well-explored notion that something's rotten beneath the neighborly pleasantries and manicured lawns of suburbia has proved to be a durable one, if properly tweaked, updated or, in the case of The Details, taken literally and inflated to absurd, Lynchian heights.

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Performing Arts
3:35 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Broadway To Sandy: The Show Is Back On

Superstorm Sandy starting hitting New York on Monday. By Wednesday, life had returned to the Time Square theater district.
John Lamparski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 4:42 pm

One of New York's biggest economic engines reopened on Wednesday after being dark in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. Broadway brings in more than $1 billion in annual ticket sales and billions more in revenue from hotels, restaurants and other businesses in the Times Square area. But getting Broadway running, with much of the transportation system down, required some extreme measures.

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Author Interviews
3:35 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Reading 125 Titles A Year? That's 'One For The Books'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 5:37 pm

Joe Queenan reads so many books, it's amazing that he can also find time to write them. Queenan estimates he's read between 6,000 and 7,000 books total, at a rate of about 125 books a year — (or 100 in a "slow" year). "Some years I just went completely nuts," Queenan tells NPR's Robert Siegel. "A couple years ago I read about 250. I was trying to read a book every single day of the year but I kind of ran out of gas."

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Movie Reviews
3:07 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

In 'The Bay,' A Plunge Into Suspense For Levinson

The dog days of summer turn deadly in The Bay.
Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:02 pm

For most of us, the enjoyment of horror movies depends on the sheer unlikeliness of their storylines. Knowing that the average swamp does not contain a slimy monster or that a nest of cannibals would have a hard time surviving in a depopulated desert — at some point, even mutants have to make a Wal-Mart run — is the cocoa that helps us sleep. And that's the challenge for The Bay: This astonishingly effective environmental nightmare is based on reasoning that, if you've been following the science, seems all too possible.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Amid Discord, A 'Quartet' Strives For Harmony

Members of a famous string quartet (Mark Ivanir, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Christopher Walken and Catherine Keener) fight to stay together despite internal conflict.
RKO Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 10:56 am

It's rare these days to see an old-fashioned, elegant chamber-piece movie about life and art — let alone one with Christopher Walken as, of all things, a steadying influence.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Eyeliner, Lipstick And Finding Your 'Place'

Aging musician Cheyenne (Sean Penn) and his wife, Jane (Frances McDormand), live a relatively normal life out of the spotlight.
The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 5:46 pm

A near-agoraphobic musician is an odd protagonist for a road movie, but then "odd" is the operative term for This Must Be the Place, Italian director Paolo Sorrentino's first English-language film. This mashup of genres and themes doesn't entirely succeed, but it is warm, funny and ably crafted.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

A Life And A Plane, In Free Fall From 20,000 Feet

Airline pilot Whip Whitaker (Denzel Washington) is hailed as a hero after averting disaster when his plane malfunctions — but as Flight goes on, it turns out he's anything but a shining example.
Robert Zuckerman Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 5:21 pm

For Whip Whitaker, the commercial airline pilot played by Denzel Washington in Flight, daily life is about achieving a practiced but tenuous equilibrium between the professional he's required to be and the wreck he really is. As the opening scene reveals, it involves keeping his poisons in harmony: Peeling himself off a hotel bed after a wild night, Whip guzzles the stale swill from a quarter-full beer bottle, does a couple of lines of cocaine as a pick-me-up and strides confidently out the door in his uniform. This is the morning routine.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Battered But Not Broken, Vets Seek 'High Ground'

Spc. Steve Baskis goes on patrol in Iraq.
Steve Baskis

Mountain climbing asks a lot of its devotees. One should ideally be in top physical condition, with all senses at peak performance, and possessed of a quality that, if it's not best described as fearlessness, is at least a willingness to ignore the natural instinct not to dangle precariously above a drop of several thousand feet.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

'Ralph': An 8-Bit Hero With Plenty Of Heart

Wreck-It Ralph (John C. Reilly) grows tired of being overshadowed by Fix-It Felix Jr., the "good guy" star of their game, and sets off on a quest to prove he's got what it takes to be a hero.
Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 10:15 pm

After a very long engagement that began with the original Toy Story, Disney finally made an honest woman out of Pixar in 2006, when it paid the requisite billions to move the computer animation giant into the Magic Kingdom. But Disney's spirited 2010 hit Tangled made it abundantly clear that Pixar had a say in the creative marriage: The story of Rapunzel may be standard Disney princess fare, but the whip-crack pacing and fractured-fairy tale wit felt unmistakably Pixar. From now on, it would seem, Mickey Mouse and Luxo Jr.

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Author Interviews
12:26 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Ricks: Firing 'The Generals' To Fight Better Wars?

Penguin Group USA

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 3:17 pm

When Thomas Ricks first learned that Terry Allen, the successful general in charge of the 1st Infantry Division during World War II's Sicily campaign, had been fired, he says, his jaw dropped.

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Opinion
11:30 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Even Americans Find Some Britishisms 'Spot On'

Geoff Nunberg says that, like a lot of the Britishisms peppering American speech these days, "spot on" falls somewhere in the blurry region between affectation and flash.
Zdenek Ryzner iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 1:26 pm

Mitt Romney was on CNN not long ago defending the claims in his campaign ads — "We've been absolutely spot on," he said. Politics aside, the expression had me doing an audible roll of my eyes. I've always associated "spot on" with the type of Englishman who's played by Terry-Thomas or John Cleese, someone who pronounces "yes" and "ears" in the same way — "eeahzz." It shows up when people do send-ups of plummy British speech. "I say — spot on, old chap!"

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
10:50 am
Thu November 1, 2012

November Kids' Book Club Pick: 'The Red Pyramid'

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 10:21 am

Mention the name Rick Riordan to adults, and they might say, "Huh?" But kids? They know. Riordan has been burning up the best-seller lists with three different series of books that all feature modern-day kids entangled in the lives of ancient gods. The Red Pyramid — the December pick of NPR's Backseat Book Club — features a brother and sister who have no idea they are descended from age-old sorcerers until their archaeologist father accidentally unleashes ancient gods into modern society.

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The Salt
7:49 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Day Of The Dead, Decoded: A Joyful Celebration Of Life And Food

Skeletons: Skeleton imagery pervades this holiday. In pre-Columbian times, the Day of the Dead was celebrated in August. It now takes place on Nov. 1 and Nov. 2, coinciding with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 1:19 pm

Sugar skulls, tamales, and spirits (the alcoholic kind) — these are things you might find on homemade altars to entice those who've passed to the other side back for a visit. The altars, built in homes and around tombstones, are for Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, a tradition originating in central Mexico on Nov. 1 and 2.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu November 1, 2012

'Elsewhere' Has Beauty, But No Happy Ending

Knopf

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 6:07 pm

Richard Russo sits in his elderly mother's home, holding her hand. She's just been diagnosed with dementia, one more illness to add to the long list of ailments she's been battling for years. She wonders aloud whether she'll ever be able to read again, plainly scared at the prospect of a life without her favorite hobby. She takes a look around her small apartment, and tells her son that she hates it.

"I just wish you could be happy, Mom," he says, heartbroken. "I used to be," she responds. "I know you don't believe that, but I was."

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Author Interviews
3:06 am
Thu November 1, 2012

'Smitten Kitchen' Takes The Fuss Out Of Cooking

Deb Perelman

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 1:26 pm

Think of the smallest kitchen you can imagine, and then take away a few square feet. That's Deb Perelman's New York kitchen. It's so small that the blogger, and now author, literally has to wedge herself between the stove and the refrigerator to cook.

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Arts
3:31 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

C.W. Ayon

KRWG Music Spotlight 109 - C.W. Ayon

Arts & Life
3:11 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

A 'Witch Queen' Who Casts Her Spells Year-Round

Courtesy of Faith in the Five Boroughs

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 1:53 pm

Lady Rhea is not the kind of witch you'll find in a pointy hat this Halloween. She is a real workaday witch, grinding out a living selling magic products in a booth at Original Products, a grocery store-sized botanica in the Bronx. She's been a practicing Wiccan for nearly four decades, making her one of the longest-serving high priestesses in New York City.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
12:43 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

Possessed By 'The Exorcist': Are You Terrified Yet?

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:51 am

Mark Danielewski is the author of The Fifty Year Sword.

When I was 12, the movie was forbidden. What my parents matter-of-factly declared too scary, friends confirmed with added notes of hysteria: "Nothing more terrifying!" "The most horrifying film ever made!" "People pass out!"

In Provo, Utah, where I grew up, Mormon children — and in my world that meant all of my friends — reported how just a glimpse resulted in actual, irreversible possession.

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