Arts/Life

The Salt
9:13 am
Mon June 11, 2012

The Psychology Of The Honor System At The Farm Stand

Swanton Berry Farm's famous honor till
Sarah Twitchell Flickr.com

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 10:04 am

In a state full of tasty surprises, count the Swanton Berry Farm, along the coast highway just north of Santa Cruz, California, among the most charming. At this pick-your-own, certified-organic berry field and farm stand cafe on the planted bluffs above a tumbling surf, you can pick or picnic with ocean views — and, if you're lucky, catch a glimpse of a grey whale and her calf migrating north from Baja.

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Monkey See
9:00 am
Mon June 11, 2012

The Most Intriguing, Promising, Not-Here-Yet Games Of E3

A scene from the new version of video game Halo 4, shown at the Microsoft Xbox E3 2012 media briefing.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 4:53 pm

The controlled chaos and wonderfully oppressive din of E3 (the Electronic Entertainment Expo), the world's most important videogame expo, has ended. During the event in downtown Los Angeles, many journalists and fan sites distributed awards purporting to name the best games of the show. The problem? These games aren't even completed. Sometimes, they aren't even playable at the show. These awards, therefore, have become both ubiquitous and nearly meaningless.

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Monkey See
2:36 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Picturing Tunisia: A Favorite Hollywood Location Through A Different Lens

A scene from the Kairouan medina - where some of the street scenes from Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark were filmed.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 4:48 am

Here's a movie scene burned into my brain: Harrison Ford, playing Indiana Jones, is on a chase through the streets of Cairo. It's in the original movie Raiders of the Lost Ark, which I saw as a kid. Today I couldn't tell you who was chasing whom or why, but I remember the climax. Jones is pushing through a mass of people when the crowd abruptly parts. He's confronted by a swordsman, who flips his giant scimitar around both artfully and menacingly.

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Movie Interviews
3:05 pm
Sun June 10, 2012

'Mr. Cao' Recalls Rookie Congressman's Unlikely Rise

When Anh "Joseph" Cao beat Democratic incumbent Rep. William Jefferson in 2008, he became the first Vietnamese-American ever to serve in Congress. Two years later, he failed to win a second term.
Bao Nguyen Walking Iris Films

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 4:11 pm

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Author Interviews
12:08 pm
Sun June 10, 2012

Bear Grylls on Family, Faith And Drinking Pee

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 6:31 am

Survivalist Bear Grylls has been an almost inescapable figure on the Discovery Channel for years.

His show Man vs. Wild has a global audience of millions and peaked as the highest-rated cable show in the U.S. But in March, Grylls and the Discovery Channel parted ways over a contract dispute.

He's currently taking some time away from television, developing ideas for a return, and spending time with his wife, Shara, and their three young sons, Jesse, Marmaduke and Huckleberry.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

This Changes Everything!

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

On-Air Challenge: Given a sentence, change one letter in one word to make a new word which completely reverses the meaning of the sentence. For example, given "The singer is not coming on stage." Changing the "T" in not to a "W" in the word "not" makes the sentence, "The singer is now coming on stage."

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Books
4:05 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Two Poems From The Nation's New Top Poet

English professor Natasha Trethewey was named the 19th U.S. poet laureate last week.
Jalissa Gray Creative Commons Image

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 4:14 pm

Natasha Trethewey is the newly announced, 19th U.S. poet laureate. The position is described by the Library of Congress as "the nation's official lightning rod for the poetic impulse of Americans."

Trethewey tells Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin that it's a lot of responsibility.

"Just trying to be the biggest promoter of poetry; someone who's really got to do the work of bringing poetry to the widest audience possible," she says.

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Books
4:04 am
Sun June 10, 2012

No One In 'The Red House' Gets Away Unscathed

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 10:50 am

Ah, the family getaway. All of you together in one space — maybe a cabin in the mountains or a beach house. Delightful family meals, maybe some Scrabble. A time of togetherness and familial harmony.

That is decidedly not the kind of family vacation writer Mark Haddon draws inspiration from. In his latest novel, The Red House, Haddon peers inside the messy dynamics of a group of relatives, each grappling with their own fears and trying to make sense of themselves as a family, all while stuck in a vacation house in the remote English countryside.

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Books
4:03 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Audiobooks That'll Make The Family Road Trip Fly By

Chris Silas Neal

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

It's time to rev up the old minivan and hit the road for summer vacation. One way to stave off those "are we there yet" questions is to get 'em hooked on an audiobook.

It just so happens that this is the season when there are a lot of new audiobooks to choose from. Last week, prizes for the best audiobooks of the year were announced at the annual Audie awards.

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Theater
10:03 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Behind The Stars, The Sets That Help Them Shine

The idea behind Ost's design was to keep the set out of the way of the storytelling --€” and of Newsies' kinetic ensemble.
Mike Coppola Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Broadway caps off its 2011-2012 season June 10 at the 66th annual Tony Awards, and while the focus will mostly be on the nominated shows and actors, some attention must be paid to the set designers — the people who help create the environments that let those shows and actors shine.

Take Daniel Ostling: When he read Bruce Norris' script for Clybourne Park, a play that takes place in a very realistic Chicago bungalow, the veteran scenarist quickly came to a realization: "The house is actually a character."

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Theater
10:03 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Tony Predictions From A Record-Breaking Season

Philip Seymour Hoffman (center) and Andrew Garfield (left) with Finn Wittrock and Linda Emond in the revival of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. The play received seven nominations in total.
Brigitte Lacombe New York Magazine

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 5:43 pm

Let's get this out of the way: The most anticipated show of the past two Broadway seasons — Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark -- finally opened, after multiple delays, cast injuries, the firing of its writer-director Julie Taymor and the longest preview period in Broadway history, on June 14th, 2011, a few days after last year's Tony Awards.

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Arts & Life
2:55 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Kansas Arts Budget Restoration Builds Goodwill

Children rehearse for a production of The Wizard of Oz at the Lawrence Arts Center in Lawrence, Kan.
Stephen Koranda Kansas Public Radio

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 5:41 pm

Last year, Kansas became the first state in the nation to completely eliminate arts funding. Republican Gov. Sam Brownback has always said he supports the arts, but when the state was facing a tight budget, he said Kansas needed to cut back.

"As we look to grow Kansas' economy and focus state government resources to ensure the most efficient use of taxpayer dollars, we must do all we can to protect the core functions of state government," he said.

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Author Interviews
2:13 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Steve Guttenberg Writes His Own 'Bible'

Steve Guttenberg (left), Michael Winslow (center) and G.W. Bailey star in 1987's Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol, part of the film franchise launched by 1984's Police Academy.
Warner Bros./Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 5:41 pm

When Steve Guttenberg was 16, he went to see an agent about starting his acting career.

That agent told him: "You are the last guy I would pick to be a movie star."

Guttenberg decided to become an actor anyway.

The summer before he was supposed to start the University of Albany, he moved from Long Island to Los Angeles to try his luck. Once there, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, he snuck onto the Paramount Studios lot, set up his own office, and started making phone calls to agents and producers.

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Author Interviews
4:10 am
Sat June 9, 2012

'Mission': Secrecy And Stardom On The Edge Of War

Mission to Paris book cover

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 8:58 am

Fredric Stahl is "the sympathetic lawyer, the kind aristocrat, the saintly husband, the comforting doctor, or the good lover." At least onscreen.

He's an American movie star, born in Vienna, and says "my dear" with a kind of dreamy, trans-European cosmopolitan allure that makes him seem "a warm man in a cold world." He's also the hero of Alan Furst's new novel, Mission to Paris, set in Furst's favorite locale: Europe on the brink of war.

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Author Interviews
12:03 am
Sat June 9, 2012

How 'The Queen Of British Ska' Wrestled With Race

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 5:44 am

The British ska-revival band The Selecter formed in the late 1970s, playing what can be described as rock fused with calypso and American jazz.

Much of what set the band apart was its charismatic lead singer, Pauline Black. As one of few women in a musical movement dominated by men, she was called "The Queen of British Ska."

That experience is one of many recounted in her new memoir, Black by Design, which has just been released in the U.S.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:30 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

White House Chef Sam Kass Plays Not My Job

Kevin Dietsch-Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 9:32 am

Sam Kass was working as a private chef in Chicago when one of his clients got a new job, so he moved with that client to Washington, D.C., where he now cooks in large building with an Oval Office, a rose garden ... and a tiny kitchen. He's the first family's personal chef and an important player in Michelle Obama's healthful food initiative.

Since Kass is so good at doing things that are really good for you, we've invited him to play a game called, "You'll put an eye out!" Three questions about things that are really, really bad for you.

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Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
1:45 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 1:55 pm

Michelle Obama's diary of her White House garden, American Grown, debuts at No. 4.

The Salt
1:30 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Food Truck Cookbook Tracks Best Meals Served On Wheels

The crew of Shindigs sets up shop in a parking lot in Birmingham.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 4:59 pm

With recent news that even Paris has one, food trucks are certainly in vogue these days. In the U.S., they're now spreading from the hot scenes in Los Angeles and New York to smaller cities, like Milwaukee and Madison. Even school systems are jumping on the food truck bandwagon.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
1:28 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 1:52 pm

Mitchell Zuckoff's Lost in Shangri-La, a World War II rescue adventure, debuts at No. 9.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
1:26 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 1:55 pm

The Sense of an Ending, Julian Barnes' Booker Prize-winning look at self-delusion, debuts at No. 6.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
1:20 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 2:00 pm

The Yard, Alex Grecian's tale of early forensics and murder in Victorian London, debuts at No. 13.

The Salt
11:10 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Our Obama Family Dinner Survey Shows Brown Rice Is Still A Tough Sell

First Lady Michelle Obama, here with students from Bancroft Elementary School and Kimball Elementary School, has done a lot to promote healthy family dinners and garden-fresh food.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

More than 10,000 of you took our recent survey about how your family meals stack up against the Obamas'. And it turns out, you're a pretty healthy bunch.

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Monkey See
10:53 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: An Exploration Of Strange Creatures

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

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Poetry
10:27 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Natasha Trethewey: 'Poetry's Always A Kind Of Faith'

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 11:39 am

Portions of this interview were originally broadcast on July 16, 2007, Jan. 20, 2009 and Aug. 18, 2010.

This week, the Library of Congress announced that Natasha Trethewey, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Native Guard, will be the next poet laureate of the United States.

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Movie Reviews
10:13 am
Fri June 8, 2012

In 'Dark Horse,' A Wasted Life Plays Out On Screen

In Dark Horse, Abe (Jordan Gelber) and Miranda (Selma Blair) meet at a wedding and start a relationship soon after, though not for the most romantic reasons.
Jojo Whilden

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 1:46 pm

It's tough to get on Todd Solondz's wavelength, but boy is it worth the emotional gyrations. Just when you've decided he has too much contempt for his characters to do more than take cheap shots, he'll shock you with flashes of empathy, insights that cast a revelatory light over what came before. You could never call Solondz a humanist, but he achieves something I've never seen elsewhere: compassionate revulsion.

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Remembrances
10:07 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Ray Bradbury: 'It's Lack That Gives Us Inspiration'

"I'd like to come back every 50 years and see how we can use certain technological advantages to our advantage," said science-fiction author Ray Bradbury. He died Tuesday at age 91.
Steve Castillo AP

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 12:27 pm

This interview was originally broadcast in 1988.

Ray Bradbury didn't like negative people. The science-fiction writer and author of Fahrenheit 451 told Terry Gross in 1988 that he found out about negative people in fourth grade, shortly after his classmates started making fun of him for collecting Buck Rogers comic strips.

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Books
9:58 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Luke, I Am Your Father, Now Pick Up Your Toys

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 10:41 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now, Father's Day is a little over a week away and we try to take the day to appreciate the dads in our lives, but if you think you had some tough times with your dad, you've got nothing on this famous film father and son.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STAR WARS: EPISODE V - THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK")

JAMES EARL JONES: (as Darth Vader) Obi Wan never told you what happened to your father.

MARK HAMILL: (as Luke Skywalker) He told me enough. He told me you killed him.

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Monkey See
9:16 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Hello Again, My Gooey Friends: On Loving 'Alien' And Seeing 'Prometheus'

Michael Fassbender plays a replicant in Ridley Scott's Prometheus.
Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 1:40 pm

Strap in, pioneers! The FTL drive is spun up, the moorings cleared, the life-support system supportive. We are go for launch to a remote, mysterious, possibly hostile landscape in search of our — okay, my — origins.

Its human designation? One-niner-eighty-six.

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TED Radio Hour
7:49 am
Fri June 8, 2012

How Do Introverts Share Ideas?

"There's something about [solitude] in our culture that's... not permissable, or threatening, or not cool." — Susan Cain
James Duncan Davidson TED

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TED Radio Hour
7:49 am
Fri June 8, 2012

What Happens When Ideas Have Sex?

"There's a sense in which this meeting and mating of ideas has ... a momentum of its own" — Matt Ridley
James Duncan Davidson TED

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