Arts/Life

TED Radio Hour
7:55 am
Fri June 22, 2012

How Do Schools Suffocate Creativity?

"There's a terrible tendency to confuse raising standards with standardizing." — Sir Ken Robinson
Robert Leslie TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Building A Better Classroom. Watch Sir Ken Robinson's full Talks — Schools Kill Creativity and Bring On The Learning Revolution -- on TED.com

About Sir Ken Robinson's Talks

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TED Radio Hour
7:55 am
Fri June 22, 2012

How Can Fourth-Graders Solve World Problems?

Educator John Hunter says being a teacher is like reaching through time. "You're making an effect right here, in this room today you're not even aware of, and yet decades later — maybe even generations later, the effect can become apparent."
James Duncan Davidson TED

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Cabinet of Wonders
7:48 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Cabinet Of Wonders: Episode Five

This week's Cabinet of Wonders lineup sing "Religious Experience" to close the show.
Patrick Monaghan Courtesy of Cabinet of Wonders

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 2:07 pm

  • Listen to this Episode

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Monkey See
6:47 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Silverdocs Catch-Up: Poets, Politics, And George Plimpton As Himself

George Plimpton plays with the Detroit Lions in Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton As Himself.
Silverdocs

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Movie Interviews
1:00 am
Fri June 22, 2012

A Timeless Story Takes A 'Brave' Female Twist

Brave's Princess Merida, like any teenager, clashes with her mother, Queen Elinor.
Disney Pixar

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 5:17 am

After movies starring the likes of Buzz Lightyear, a little robot named Wall-E, a fish called Nemo and a car named Lightning McQueen, Pixar is releasing its first film with a female lead.

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Games & Humor
4:25 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Are You Better Than Bieber?

Are You Better Than Bieber?
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images Entertainment

Originally published on Thu December 20, 2012 10:04 am

  • Listen to 'Better Than Bieber' from Ask Me Another
  • Listen to 'Pen It Like Porter' from Ask Me Another

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Pop Culture
3:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Branding 'Brave': The Cultural Capital Of Princesses

In Brave, the character of Merida is a skilled archer and sword fighter who rebels against what is expected of her as a princess.
Disney/Pixar

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 11:42 am

For little girls, princesses hold roughly the same value that tulips did for the Dutch back in the 1500s, and that princess mania is sure to get a boost with the new Pixar movie Brave, which stars a Scottish princess named Merida.

For a keyhole glimpse into the pink and glittery world of pre-K princess culture, consider the scene at a recent princess-themed birthday party in a suburb of Washington, D.C.

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Movie Reviews
3:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Time In 'To Rome With Love': It Doesn't Make Sense

Antonio the newlywed (Alessandro Tiberi, left), Uncle Paolo (Roberto Della Casa) and Anna the prostitute (Penelope Cruz) in one of To Rome With Love's four independent stories. This one features Anna attempting to teach Antonio something about love.
Philippe Antonello Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 4:19 pm

For four decades, Woody Allen's been churning out movies at a rate of almost exactly one film per year, a phenomenon that I'd describe as being "like clockwork" if my whole sense of time hadn't been scrambled by his latest comedy, To Rome With Love.

Pleasantly scrambled, but still.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

The Visible Costs Of The Military's 'Invisible War'

Kori Cioca is the linking thread among many stories in The Invisible War. Kirby Dick's documentary reveals a shocking culture of sexual assault in the U.S. military.
Cinedigm/Docurama Films

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 9:55 am

In documentaries, showing is almost always more effective than telling. But The Invisible War, an expose of sexual assault in the U.S. military, is compelling despite being all talk. Footage of the many crimes recounted in the film is, of course, nonexistent — and would be nearly unwatchable if available.

So director Kirby Dick addresses the subject directly, without gimmicks or gambits. Stylistically, The Invisible War is conventional and plainspoken, from its opening clips of vintage recruitment ads for women to its closing updates on the central characters.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Hank Williams Takes A Back Seat In 'The Last Ride'

In The Last Ride, Silas (Jesse James, right) is hired to drive Hank Williams (Henry Thomas) to his New Year's gigs and must learn to stand up to the country singer's hectoring behavior.
Melody Gaither Mozark Productions

The Last Ride recounts the final days of country-music legend Hank Williams, but it's strangely short on actual information about the singer. We only sparingly hear snippets of his music on the radio, and we learn almost nothing of his past. In fact, no one ever refers to the man by his proper name.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Two Couples Bunk Up For 'A Burning Hot Summer'

in Philippe Garrel's A Burning Hot Summer, Angele (Monica Bellucci) and Frederic (Louis Garrel) make up the more tempestuous of two couples living together in Rome.
IFC Films

Lovely people, beautiful places, a suicide attempt and echoes of a French New Wave classic — these ingredients seem to promise lots of passion in A Burning Hot Summer. But this existential-romantic roundelay barely simmers, and certainly doesn't scorch.

Veteran director Philippe Garrel's latest film opens with apparently parallel events: a woman reclines naked, alone in a room, as a man guns his car, heading straight for a tree.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Lincoln's Life, Stylized (And Somewhat Embellished)

Abraham Lincoln (Benjamin Walker) and Will Johnson (Anthony Mackie) in one of the slick action sequences from Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Lincoln's weapon of choice in the film is a silver-plated ax.
20th Century Fox

Two films into his English-language directing career, and already Timur Bekmambetov is spinning his wheels. But at least when the Kazakh director does so, the wheels have glistening silver rims and spin in hyperdetailed, superslow motion, all while the car is spinning through the air in a graceful, arcing corkscrew.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

In 'Brave,' A Pixar Princess At Odds With Her Place

Merida, the heroine in Pixar's Brave, causes much family drama by refusing to get married — and acting more like her father, King Fergus, than a "proper princess."
Disney/Pixar

Not since Walt Disney's heyday has an animation company enjoyed a creative — and technically innovative — run like Pixar, now on a two-decade stretch that started with Toy Story in 1995 and continued with modern classics like Finding Nemo, Monsters Inc., The Incredibles, WALL-E, Ratatouille and two Toy Story sequels that took on improbable depth and complexity. Over the years, the only persistent knock against Pixar is its lack of one thing Disney movies had in spades: female heroines.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Sharing Small Moments While Waiting For A Big Bang

In Seeking a Friend for the End of the World, Penny (Keira Knightley) and Dodge (Steve Carell) help each other reconnect with distant family and an old love before an asteroid destroys life on Earth.
Darren Michaels Focus Features

Like the romance it portrays, Seeking a Friend for the End of the World is brief, sweet, funny and sad. It's also tonally uncertain and occasionally foolish, but somehow these flaws never derail the story's wistful pleasures, not the least of which — if we ignore an unpleasant speech by Patton Oswalt — is its pleasing lack of the frat-boy vulgarity that has come to define so much of the genre.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

'To Rome': Allen, Fiddling Again With Familiar Ideas

In Woody Allen's latest, John (Alec Baldwin, left) begins to live vicariously through complications in Jack's (Jesse Eisenberg) love life.
Philippe Antonello Sony Pictures Classics

Woody Allen's slack new movie, To Rome with Love, comes fortified with a fine bit of nonsense involving a shower, a loofah and a nervous Italian tenor who's terrified of performing in public.

Allen repeats the joke at well-spaced intervals, and he's right to: It represents what's best in his comedy, a goofball grace note in which he invites us to join in his delight in the sublime absurdity of artistic endeavor. Around my local screening room, it seemed that just about everyone obliged.

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Remembrances
10:23 am
Thu June 21, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Film Critic Andrew Sarris

Film critic Andrew Sarris was married to fellow critic Molly Haskell.
Dave Kotinsky Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 10:56 am

This interview was originally broadcast on August 8, 1990.

Andrew Sarris, who popularized the auteur theory and was called the "dean of American film critics," died on Wednesday. He was 83.

In 1962, Sarris became the first American film critic to write about the auteur theory. That's the idea that the director of a movie is the person most responsible for it, and that movies can be better understood if they're seen in the context of a director's complete body of work.

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Television
10:11 am
Thu June 21, 2012

'The Newsroom' Caught Up In A Partisan Divide

In Aaron Sorkin's new HBO drama, The Newsroom, producer MacKenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer) and anchorman Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) tackle real hard-hitting news stories and call out those who don't tell the truth.
HBO

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 10:56 am

If anyone in Hollywood wears his idealism like a boutonniere, it's Aaron Sorkin. As The West Wing made clear, Sorkin loves telling stories about principled individuals — especially liberals — struggling with institutions that might compromise their integrity.

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Books
10:03 am
Thu June 21, 2012

Will Your Children Inherit Your E-Books?

Goddard works with a steel combustion chamber and rocket nozzle, around 1915.
Fotosearch Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 3:05 pm

In 1898, a man bought a book for his 16-year-old nephew. "Many happy retoins [sic]. Uncle Spud," he wrote on a blank page at the front.

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Monkey See
9:25 am
Thu June 21, 2012

Silverdocs: The Scramble For Care In 'The Waiting Room'

Certified Nurse Assistant Cynthia Johnson handles some of the intake at Highland Hospital's ER, featured in The Waiting Room.
Ken Light Silverdocs

Highland Hospital in Oakland has what's supposed to be an emergency room, and that's where the documentary The Waiting Room is set.

But as it turns out, at a big public hospital in Oakland, an ER only does so much actual trauma care; it only handles so many things you would usually think of as emergencies. The rest of the time, it functions as a primary care health provider that's not at all designed to be one — largely for people who have no insurance.

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Monkey See
6:58 am
Thu June 21, 2012

Silverdocs: 'Time Zero' For All Those Heartbroken Polaroid Photographers

Time Zero: The Last Year Of Polaroid Film looks at what happened when Polaroid decided to discontinue its instant film.
Silverdocs

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu June 21, 2012

'Windeye': Gripping Tales Of Horror And Mystery

iStockphoto

As if wooing Sisyphus, I push hungrily through the 25 stories in Brian Evenson's new collection, Windeye, trying each time to get to The Answer. Is the man a maniacal killer, or trapped in an experiment? What happens in the caves? Will the dead boy be avenged? Can Halle survive until the end of the oxygen shortage?

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American Dreams: Then And Now
1:50 am
Thu June 21, 2012

Native American Comic Living The 'Indigenous Dream'

Comedian Charlie Hill says he's achieved the American dream, but that it's been out of reach for many fellow Native Americans.
Courtesy of Charlie Hill

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 7:53 am

Native American comedian Charlie Hill says he's living the American dream.

Actually, make that the "indigenous dream," which he prefers to call it.

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Theater
1:49 am
Thu June 21, 2012

50 Years Later, Still Free, Still Battling The Weather

Orlando (David Furr), Rosalind (Lily Rabe, right) and Celia (Renee Elise Goldsberry) in As You Like It. The Public Theater's production opens the 50th-anniversary season at New York's Delacorte Theater.
Joan Marcus The Public Theater

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 4:21 am

On Monday evening, one of New York's most cherished cultural institutions celebrated an anniversary. The Delacorte Theater, home of the free annual Shakespeare in the Park, turned 50, and Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline led an all-star cast in a staged reading of Romeo and Juliet.

When Kline was still a student in the drama program at The Juilliard School, he made his professional debut at the Delacorte. "My first job was carrying a spear in Richard III," he remembers.

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Art & Design
3:21 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

340 Tons Of Art: 'Levitated Mass' To Rock L.A.

A 2011 sketch by artist Michael Heizer shows the walkway visitors will use to pass under the granite boulder at the center of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's installation. (Click here to enlarge.)
Courtesy of Michael Heizer

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 7:39 am

Los Angeles has a new rock star — a 340-ton boulder perched above a long walk-through trench at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The installation, called Levitated Mass, is a new work by artist Michael Heizer that opens to the public on June 24.

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Television
3:21 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

Facing Up To Bullies, Everywhere But On Reality TV

Simon Cowell in his early days as an American Idol judge. The success of Cowell and others shows that bullying is acceptable, says Eric Deggans, so long as it's done on reality TV.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 4:23 pm

Over the past couple of years, the topic of bullying has come to the forefront of public discourse: on TV, in social media, in newspapers and in movies.

So it only makes sense all this talk would eventually seep into the nation's largest Rorschach test: prime-time television. From Law and Order: SVU to The Simpsons, from House to Nurse Jackie, the word "bully" gets thrown around a lot these days, even when it's describing behavior that's less bullying and closer to rudeness.

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Ask Me Another
2:57 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

Jeremy Schaap: The Cheese Rolls Alone

Sports journalist Jeremy Schaap in the hot seat on the Ask Me Another stage.
Steve McFarland NPR

Originally published on Fri December 21, 2012 1:20 pm

As legend has it, Jeremy Schaap caused his father, legendary sports journalist Dick Schaap, to miss two of the three home runs hit by Reggie Jackson during Game 6 of the 1977 World Series. Why? Apparently, Jeremy had sent his dad on successive trips to get him a hot dog and a soda. Luckily, his dad refused to get him a beer.

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Television
9:57 am
Wed June 20, 2012

Jeff Daniels: Anchoring The Cast Of 'The Newsroom'

After a public meltdown and a wholesale staff defection, Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) decides to take a different approach with his nightly news show.
HBO

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 10:22 am

Aaron Sorkin's new HBO drama The Newsroom revolves around Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels), a popular cable-news anchor floating happily along with his nightly newscast, which does well in the ratings but doesn't tend to delve into anything that could offend or alienate anyone.

After McAvoy has a public meltdown at a university lecture, he's put on a three-week hiatus by his boss (Sam Waterston). During McAvoy's time off, his staff defects and a new executive producer named Mackenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer) is hired to take the helm of McAvoy's show.

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Monkey See
7:02 am
Wed June 20, 2012

Silverdocs: 'The Imposter' And The Mystery Of The Nervous Laughter

This is not Nicholas Barclay.
Silverdocs

They really give it away in the title, don't they?

In 1994, a 13-year-old boy named Nicholas Barclay disappeared in Texas. In 1997, a man showed up in Spain and claimed to be the 16-year-old Nicholas. He wasn't – he was a 23-year-old con man – but he managed to get himself brought to the United States with a passport in Nicholas' name. He moved in with Nicholas' family. They accepted him as Nicholas.

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Kitchen Window
5:43 am
Wed June 20, 2012

A Twist On Tea And Cookies

Reem Rizvi for NPR

As a child, I never appreciated the joy of tea. In fact, I never really had the chance, as my grandmother would say, "Children should not be drinking tea; it is not good for them." If it had been any other beverage, I would have fought with her, but I didn't care enough about tea. I did, however, outgrow that stage. I began to experiment with different teas and learn how to flavor tea with my real passion: spices.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed June 20, 2012

A Question Unanswered: 'How Should A Person Be?'

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 8:36 am

The unexamined life isn't worth living, according to Socrates, and you'd be hard-pressed to find a writer who disagrees. Few, though, have taken it to the extreme that Toronto author Sheila Heti does with How Should a Person Be? The relentlessly introspective "novel from life" earned critical raves when it was released in Canada in 2010. The book chronicles Heti's struggle — sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking — to answer the seemingly simple questions: "What was the right way to react to people? Who was I to talk to at parties? How was I to be?"

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