Arts/Life

Music
9:51 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Major U.S. Folk Music Archive Makes Online Debut

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 12:52 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, I'll share some of my thoughts in my weekly essay. That's in just a few minutes.

But first, if you are a fan of folk music - or so-called world music - there is a new treasure to be found online. Alan Lomax spent decades traveling the world, braving all sorts of conditions and even risking his life and health, to collect recordings of music, spoken-word performances, and more.

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Author Interviews
9:44 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Creating A New Vision Of Islam In America

Feisal Abdul Rauf is the author of three books on Islam, including What's Right with Islam is What's Right with America.

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 11:54 am

Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, a leading moderate Muslim leader in the U.S., was once the lead cleric associated with the proposed Islamic community center some critics called the "ground zero mosque." In late 2010, a debate over the location of the community center, now called the Cordoba House, became a contentious issue during the midterm elections.

During the debate, Rauf was called a "radical Muslim" and a "militant Islamist" by critics of the proposed community center. He was accused of sympathizing with the Sept. 11 hijackers and having connections to Hamas.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed May 9, 2012

'Tai Lake': Murder Most Ecological In China

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 6:16 am

It's always bad news when a detective books a vacation. Where other frolickers find fun in the sun, investigators are more likely to stumble over stiffs in the sand. The Orient Express was a train enthusiast's dream until Hercule Poirot — and Death — stepped aboard; in Dorothy Sayers' classic mystery, Busman's Honeymoon, Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane can't even enjoy a little nookie in their nuptial hideaway without bumping into an intrusive cadaver in the cellar. In detective fiction, Death never takes a holiday.

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Arts & Life
9:08 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Tina Brown's Must Reads: Resistance

Former Yukos CEO Mikhail Khodorkovsky walks into court in Moscow, Russia, May 24, 2011. A Moscow appeals court upheld the second conviction of Khodorkovsky, reducing his prison sentence by one year for a total of 13 years. He will be released in 2016.
Misha Japaridze AP

Originally published on Wed May 30, 2012 2:24 pm

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call "Word of Mouth." This month, Brown selects two recent pieces of news commentary and a memoir on political resistors.

A Son's Plea For A Dissident Father

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Kitchen Window
5:09 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Power Puff: Flex Your Culinary Muscle With A Souffle

Nicole Spiridakis for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 12:49 pm

Souffle. Just a whisper of the word strikes fear into the heart of the most accomplished (not to mention inexperienced) home cook. First, the neurosis: Are the eggs fresh enough? Will it rise? What if it comes out horribly misshapen? Then, the biting of the fingertips: Did I whip the egg whites to the correct consistency? Will green garlic work with the asparagus? Was I nuts to try strawberries? Finally, the calm reward: This tastes delicious. What was I so worried about? Souffles aren't so difficult to make after all.

Er, maybe that's just me.

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Remembrances
9:39 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Remembering Children's Book Author Maurice Sendak

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 12:13 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we want to honor someone who's work fired the imaginations of many children and their parents. Award-winning author and illustrator Maurice Sendak died today at the age of 83.

Maurice Sendak is best known for that classic children's book "Where the Wild Things Are." He wrote and illustrated the story of the mischievous hero Max, who gets sent to bed without dinner and his imagination takes him to a land of colorful giant monsters.

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Remembrances
8:38 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Sendak's Legacy: Helping Kids 'Survive Childhood'

Sendak talks with children about his book Where the Wild Things Are at the International Youth Library in Munich in June 1971.
Keystone/Hulton Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:49 am

When author and illustrator Maurice Sendak entered the world of children's books, it was a very safe place. Stories were sweet and simple and set in a world without disorder. But Sendak, who died Tuesday at age 83, broke with that tradition. In Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak explored the darker side of childhood. Upstairs in young Max's bedroom, a jungle grows, and he sails off to a land of monsters.

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Remembrances
8:26 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Beloved Children's Author Maurice Sendak Dies

Maurice Sendak, the well-known children's book author and illustrator, has died. He was 83. Sendak is widely known for his book Where the Wild Things Are. Steve Inskeep has this remembrance.

Remembrances
7:11 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Author Maurice Sendak

In this Sept. 25, 1985 file photo, author Maurice Sendak poses with one of the characters from his book Where the Wild Things Are, designed for the operatic adaptation of his book in St. Paul, Minn. Sendak died, Tuesday, May 8, 2012 at Danbury Hospital in Danbury, Conn. He was 83.
LS AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:49 am

Author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, whose classic children's book Where the Wild Things Are became a perennial and award-winning favorite for generations of children, died Tuesday. He was 83.

Sendak appeared on Fresh Air with Terry Gross several times over the years. In 1989, he told Terry Gross that he didn't ever write with children in mind — but that somehow what he wrote turned out to be for children nonetheless.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Haunted By 'Hunger' In The Soviet Gulag

iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 8:51 pm

For the sake of full disclosure, I'll tell you that I had not read Herta Muller for a number of reasons before the appearance of Nadirs, her brilliant collection of short takes about a family of German-speakers living in the Romanian countryside. I don't know that I would have picked it up if Muller, a Romanian-born writer who works in German, had not won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2009. I can tell you I was pretty happy that I did.

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Theater
1:16 am
Tue May 8, 2012

A Test Of Hearts, Minds And 'Hands On A Hardbody'

Hands on a Hardbody
La Jolla Playhouse

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 2:04 pm

About 20 years ago, a Texas car dealership started a competition: Contestants had to keep one hand on a brand-new, fully loaded truck; the last person standing got to keep it.

It may not seem like a gripping drama, but it was the subject of a 1997 documentary. And now, it's the basis of a musical.

It's called Hands on a Hardbody, and that hardbody is, yes, the truck. At a rehearsal at the La Jolla Playhouse in California, it's on casters so the actors can spin it around the stage.

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Monkey See
1:13 pm
Mon May 7, 2012

The Tyranny Of Character: Will The Real Sacha Baron Cohen Please Stand Up?

Sacha Baron Cohen as Admiral General Aladeen in The Dictator.
Paramount Pictures

If you've had an eye on pop culture recently, chances are you've seen Admiral General Aladeen, the subject of Sacha Baron Cohen's upcoming movie The Dictator.

You might have seen him on this weekend's Saturday Night Live, trading quips with Seth Meyers (and prisoner Martin Scorsese!).

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Pop Culture
9:50 am
Mon May 7, 2012

Ready To Step Into Your Favorite Superhero's Shoes?

The movie The Avengers broke box office records this weekend. That's just one sign of the growing interest in comic book heroes, science fiction, and other fantasy genres. Host Michel Martin speaks with writer George Gonzalez about covering a recent convention for die-hard fantasy fans.

Television
9:13 am
Mon May 7, 2012

Lena Dunham Addresses Criticism Aimed At 'Girls'

Girls has been compared to Sex and the City. The characters, played by (from left) Allison Williams, Jemima Kirke, Lena Dunham and Zosia Mamet, navigate the ups and downs of life in New York City.
HBO

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 9:42 am

Lena Dunham was just 23 years old when her second feature film, Tiny Furniture, won the best narrative feature prize at the South by Southwest Film Festival. The movie's success led to Dunham striking a deal with HBO for a comedy series about a group of 20-something girls navigating New York City.

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Three Books...
5:02 am
Mon May 7, 2012

Three Cheers (And Three Books) For Mummy Dearest

iStockphoto.com

In England our Mother's Day comes a little before yours in America. This year my youngest son wrote me a poem, and ingeniously rhymed "good book" with "good cook," "fun" with "mum," and "great jokes" with "not giving pokes" — that was clearly a hard one.

I appreciated the challenge of nailing down motherhood in a short space. Here are three books that do the same thing.

Author Interviews
12:49 am
Mon May 7, 2012

'Drift': Rachel Maddow On Why We Go To War

Courtesy MSNBC

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 10:34 am

In past wars, the U.S. practically dismantled its military after the troops came home. But today, says MSNBC News anchor and writer Rachel Maddow, we find ourselves in a state of almost permanent war.

In her new book Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power, Maddow invokes Thomas Jefferson, pointing out that one of Jefferson's main concerns was the danger of having a large military.

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Fine Art
12:49 am
Mon May 7, 2012

The Serious Comic Art Of Daniel Clowes

Artist Daniel Clowes says Enid, the cantankerous heroine of Ghost World, would probably hate the book she stars in.
Daniel Clowes Oakland Museum of California

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 9:09 am

Comics used to be seen as cheap throwaway entertainment for children and teenagers. But over the last few decades, comics have grown up; they're even released in longer formats, on nice paper with hard covers, as graphic novels.

Daniel Clowes is one of the artists cited for turning the form into serious art — in fact, the art has gotten so serious that his work is now in a museum. Clowes is one of the best-known comic artists working today, with two of his books made into Hollywood films: the Academy Award-nominated Ghost World and Art School Confidential.

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Arts & Life
3:42 pm
Sun May 6, 2012

When Dick Cavett Shared Carnegie Hall With Groucho

In 1970, Groucho Marx appeared on the Dick Cavett Show. Two years later, Cavett introduced Groucho in Carnegie Hall.
Ann Limongello ABC via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 4:39 pm

Forty years ago Sunday, history was made at Carnegie Hall.

On May 6, 1972, comedian Groucho Marx made his debut at the famed New York venue to a packed house. Tickets sold out as soon as it was announced.

Marx was 81 at the time and had been out of the spotlight for many years. His one-man show only toured a handful of venues, and his Carnegie Hall show was later released as an album called An Evening with Groucho.

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NPR Story
3:22 pm
Sun May 6, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction: This Week's Featured Stories

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 4:39 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

She closed the book, placed it on the table and finally decided to walk through the door. That's the starting sentence for Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction. That is our contest where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes. We are no longer accepting submissions for this round.

Our readers from across the country are almost done going through all of the more than 6,000 submissions this round. So let's hear a few samples of their favorites so far.

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Food
5:27 am
Sun May 6, 2012

Sacrilegious Lunch?: The Cuban Sandwich Debate

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:38 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Philadelphia has its cheesesteak sandwich, Buffalo its wing. Now, Tampa has officially claimed the Cuban sandwich. The Tampa, Florida city council last month passed a resolution designating the Historic Tampa Cuban Sandwich and specifying its ingredients. From member station WUSF in Tampa, Bobby O'Brien found that claim has drawn ridicule from Miami's Cuban community.

(SOUNDBITE OF CUTTING AND PAPER UNWRAPPING)

BOBBY O'BRIEN, BYLINE: An authentic Tampa Cuban starts with the bread.

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Food
5:27 am
Sun May 6, 2012

'No Capers In The Kitchen:' Oyster Joint Turns 100

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:38 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

One hundred years ago this past week, Frank and Rose Snock opened their fish restaurant in Philadelphia. A century later, Snockey's Oyster and Crab House is still serving up deep-fried fish fillets, deviled clams and, of course, oysters.

They've got as many as a dozen varieties. Today, it's the Snock's grandchildren, Ken and Skip, who are running the show. But apparently, not much else has changed. Snockey's is still making the same oyster stew that Rose cooked for 79 years.

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Author Interviews
5:27 am
Sun May 6, 2012

'A Wedding In Haiti': Making Good On A Promise

John Seaton Callahan iStock Photo

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:38 am

Growing up in the Dominican Republic, author Julia Alvarez says she was taught to view neighboring Haiti with suspicion, given the cultural divisions between the two countries.

But because of a promise made one expansive night, Haiti, and a particular Haitian boy named Piti, would became ingrained in her heart — so much so that she would find herself smuggling Piti out of Haiti with his new family.

And after the earthquake that devastated the country in 2010, Alvarez and her husband trekked from Vermont to Haiti to help Piti find his family.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:17 am
Sun May 6, 2012

Brave Sir Robin Ran Away, But The Puzzle Is Still OK

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 4:11 pm

On-Air Challenge: You'll be given a series of categories. For each one, name something in the category beginning with each of the letters of the word "robin." For example, given the category "two-syllable boys' names," the answers could be "Roger," "Omar," "Barry," "Isaac" and "Neville."

Last Week's Challenge: Name the capital of a country that, when said out loud, sounds like a three-word phrase. This phrase might describe the reason why the police did not catch a barefoot thief. What is the capital, and what is the reason?

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Author Interviews
4:06 am
Sun May 6, 2012

'Birdseye': The Frozen Food Revolution

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:38 am

You may not have heard of Clarence Birdseye, but odds are you've eaten the results of his culinary innovation.

Birdseye is the man credited with inventing frozen food. Everything you see in supermarket freezers today, from vegetables to pizzas to frozen dinners, can be traced back to Birdseye's work. His name would come to symbolize a veritable frozen food movement in the United States.

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Fine Art
4:06 am
Sun May 6, 2012

Keith Haring: A Return To His Radiant Roots

Keith Haring Foundation

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:50 am

Keith Haring has come home. A new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum focuses on the late artist's work at the beginning of his career, from his arrival in New York in the late 1970s, through his rise to international fame four years later.

The show features rare early drawings Haring made as a young art student from Kutztown, Pa., bowled over by the sights and sounds of New York City.

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Arts & Life
4:03 am
Sun May 6, 2012

The Story Of 'How You Met Your Other' Can Say A Lot

(R-L) Jeremy Sussman and his wife Becky, along with their two children Gabby and Sammy. The couple met 22 years ago when a friend suggested they meet.
Photo provided by WNYC

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 10:06 am

If you're part of a couple, chances are you remember the exact moment you first met your mate. Well, it turns out that how a couple first met isn't just fodder for Hollywood romantic comedies, but might just predict whether a relationship thrives or falters.

That's according Faith Salie and Mario Correa, hosts of the RelationShow, a show about couples and relationships on member station WNYC.

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Movies
3:09 pm
Sat May 5, 2012

Million Time Movies: What's Your Comfort Film?

Virginia Huston and Robert Mitchum in a scene from the 1947 movie, Out of the Past.
RKO Radio Pictures/Photofest

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 11:29 am

Weekends on All Things Considered's series, Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For writer-director Lawrence Kasdan, whose credits include The Big Chill, The Empire Strikes Back and Raiders of the Lost Ark, the movie he can't get enough of is Jacques Tourneur's Out of the Past. Kasdan says that the 1947 movie is a great piece of film noir cinema.

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Author Interviews
5:11 am
Sat May 5, 2012

'Bring Up The Bodies': Taking Down Anne Boleyn

Originally published on Sat May 5, 2012 11:01 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

When Hilary Mantel's new book opens, the spark has gone out of Henry the VIII's marriage; second marriage, in fact. Anne Boleyn hasn't given him a son. Now, he finds the sharp remarks she makes that used to charm sometimes come at his expense. His roving eye begins to settle on Jane Seymour, another woman at court. But in Henry's time, a monarch doesn't go to a marriage counselor or divorce lawyer, not when Thomas Cromwell is the king's chief advisor.

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Art & Design
5:11 am
Sat May 5, 2012

I Shall 'Scream' At Such A Price Tag

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 8:26 am

One of four versions Edvard Munch made of his masterpiece, The Scream, one of the most recognizable works of art in the world, was auctioned at Sotheby's this week for a record-setting price: $119 million.

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