Business

The Salt
1:42 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Farmers Fear Legal Status For Workers Would Lead Them Off The Farm

Nahun Villagomez Sanchez washes freshly dug Red LaSoda potatoes at T&D Willey Farms near Madera, Calif.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 8:00 am

The political battle over immigration, now provoking a confrontation between Congress and the White House, touches all of us in one very direct way: our food. That salad mix, and those apples, may well have been harvested by workers who arrived here in the U.S. illegally.

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The Two-Way
1:08 am
Thu February 26, 2015

The FCC's Net Neutrality Vote: Here's What You Need To Know

Protesters demonstrate in favor of net neutrality across the street from the Comcast Center in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 11:21 am

Later this morning, the Federal Communications Commission will take a vote on adopting new rules that would keep the Internet neutral.

Update at 1 p.m. ET 2/26: FCC Adopts Net Neutrality

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The Two-Way
8:41 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Dentists Have No Right To Limit Who Can Whiten Your Teeth, Justices Say

Want to get your teeth whitened? You may soon have more options. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that a state board of dentistry unfairly drove competitors out of business by trying to block non-dentists from providing whitening services.
Vince Bucci Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 8:54 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the North Carolina dental board does not have the authority to regulate teeth-whitening services. By a 6-to-3 vote, the court said that the state board, composed mainly of dentists, violated the nation's antitrust laws by regulating the activity of competitors.

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All Tech Considered
4:28 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

What Net Neutrality Rules Could Mean For Your Wireless Carrier

T-Mobile CEO John Legere pitches a plan that allows unlimited music streaming without additional data charges. Some net neutrality proponents want the FCC to limit plans like these; the commission says it will review them on a case-by-case basis.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:37 am

After a decade of debate, the federal government is poised to change how it regulates Internet access, to make it more like telephone service and other public utilities.

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Africa
2:58 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Terrorism Fears Complicate Money Transfers For Somali-Americans

Customers wait to collect money at the Juba Express money transfer company in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Feb. 12.
Mohamed Abdiwahab AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:46 pm

Regulations intended to block money from getting into the hands of terrorist groups has led the last bank that handles most money transfers from the United States to Somalia to pull out of the business.

Somali refugees in the U.S. say their families back home need the money they send each month to survive, and they're counting on lawmakers and Obama administration officials, who are meeting in Washington on Thursday, to try to find a solution.

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Code Switch
2:12 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Supreme Court Looks At Abercrombie & Fitch's Hijab Discrimination Case

Samantha Elauf was not hired by the preppy retailer Abercrombie & Fitch because she wore a headscarf during her job interview, which the company said conflicted with its dress code.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:27 pm

A closely watched case before the Supreme Court Wednesday could have big consequences for religious rights in the workplace. It involves Abercrombie & Fitch, the preppy, mall-based retailer, and a young Muslim woman who wore a headscarf to a job interview at the company seven years ago.

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All Tech Considered
12:14 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

The World Loves The Smartphone. So How About A Smart Home?

Guido Rosa Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 1:23 pm

My coffee maker is texting me again. It's scheduled to make coffee tomorrow, the message says, but I need to refill its water tank. Welcome to the future.

The Mr. Coffee Smart Optimal Brew Coffeemaker with WeMo — yes, that is its official name — is just one of many household appliances being remade to connect to the Internet and take care of themselves. There are thermostats, smoke alarms, washing machines and even $1,000 Bluetooth-connected toilets.

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Parallels
12:06 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Saudi Women Still Can't Drive, But They Are Making It To Work

Saudi women, shown here at a cultural festival near the capital Riyadh on Sunday, still need the permission of male relatives to travel and even receive certain medical procedures, but a growing number are entering the workforce.
Fayez Nureldine AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 3:40 pm

The sign on the door to the office of eTree, an online advertising agency in Saudi Arabia's capital, Riyadh, reads: "Girls Only."

The company's founder, Esra Assery, admits it's a little sexist, and we both laugh at the joke in male-dominated Saudi Arabia — the only country that prohibits women from driving a car.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Supreme Court Sides With Fisherman In Case Of The Missing Fish

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 1:18 pm

Commercial fisherman John Yates and his crew were fishing for red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Cortez, Fla., in 2007. His vessel was boarded by John Jones, a state Fish and Wildlife officer who was working on behalf of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Workers Sue Daimler Trucks In Oregon, Alleging Racial Discrimination

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 11:05 am

Saying they were threatened with violence and harassed by white co-workers, several current and former employees of a Daimler Trucks plant in Portland, Ore., have filed a lawsuit seeking some $9.5 million. The plaintiffs are African-American.

The lawsuit comes a month after Daimler Trucks settled civil rights complaints with other minority workers at its Portland plant for $2.4 million.

From Portland, NBC TV station KGW reports:

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Inglewood Approves Plan For NFL Stadium, In Deal Involving Rams Owner

Fans hold a "Los Angeles Rams" sign during a San Diego Chargers game against the St. Louis Rams last year. Both teams are part of proposals to build new NFL stadiums in the LA area.
Donald Miralle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 11:04 am

The Los Angeles area is another step closer to hosting an NFL team, after the Inglewood, Calif., City Council approved a proposal for an 80,000-seat NFL stadium. The development plan includes St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke.

The unanimous vote Tuesday night came after "a consultant compared stadium noise in surrounding neighborhoods to that of bird calls," member station KPCC's Ben Bergman reports.

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Business
3:15 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Lenovo Sued Over Superfish Adware

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:05 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
3:10 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Fox Defends Bill O'Reilly's Account Of Falklands Conflict

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 12:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Religion
1:53 am
Wed February 25, 2015

D.C. Bible Museum Will Be Immersive Experience, Organizers Say

Steve Green in the basement of the Washington Design Center, which was recently demolished as part of the construction for the Museum of the Bible. Green and his family, owners of Hobby Lobby, are building the Museum of the Bible.
Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 4:52 pm

In Washington, D.C., construction is underway on the Museum of the Bible, an eight-story, $400 million enterprise funded by Hobby Lobby President Steve Green.

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History
6:20 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Even Pickaxes Couldn't Stop The Nation's First Oil Pipeline

Tanks holding oil in Pithole, Pa., in 1868. Samuel Van Syckel built his first pipeline over just five weeks in 1865. At 2 inches in diameter, it was tiny by modern standards — but it was an engineering marvel.
Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC

One-hundred-fifty years ago, a man named Samuel Van Syckel built the nation's first commercial oil pipeline in the rugged terrain of northwestern Pennsylvania.

His pipeline transformed how oil is transported — and it would change the modern world, too — but not before a battle that makes the debate over the Keystone XL pipeline look meek by comparison.

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Television
2:16 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Amid Declining Ratings, Cable Networks Speed Up Reruns To Make Room For Ads

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
12:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Trouble Ahead? Searching For Google's Future

Google co-founder and CEO Larry Page says the company will place more focus on its key projects.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 4:07 pm

It is hard to imagine a world without the ubiquity of Google, and the tech giant is working hard to keep it that way. Google has perfected the art of search advertising on desktop and laptop, and it controls the widely used Android mobile OS, as well as YouTube and Nest. But is the company nimble enough to capitalize on the next best thing in tech?

Some tech industry observers aren't sure.

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Obama Vetoes Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 2:40 pm

Updated at 4:04 p.m. ET

The White House has notified the Senate that President Obama has, as promised, vetoed congressional legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline project.

"Through this bill, the United States Congress attempts to circumvent longstanding and proven processes for determining whether or not building and operating a cross-border pipeline serves the national interest," Obama said in the notification to the Senate.

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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Eurozone Approves Greek Overhaul Plan

Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the head of the Eurogroup (right) sits next to Roberto Gualtieri, the chairman of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, during a meeting Tuesday at the European Parliament in Brussels. The European Union's executive branch said the list of Greek reform measures for final approval of the extended rescue loans is sufficiently comprehensive to be a valid starting point.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

European finance ministers have approved Greece's proposed economic reforms and agreed to extend financial assistance to the country by four months.

In a statement, the Eurogroup said it would begin "national procedures" – including parliamentary votes in some member states – to give the deal a final approval.

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Law
4:19 am
Tue February 24, 2015

At Supreme Court, Fashion Collides With Religion In Headscarf Case

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 4:56 pm

Fashion collides with religion at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. On one side is the retailer Abercrombie & Fitch Stores Inc., and on the other, a teenage job applicant who was highly rated for hiring but then discarded because she wore a Muslim headscarf.

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Business
3:13 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Pacific Northwest Businesses Hurt By West Coast Ports Disruption

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:48 am

Copyright 2015 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit http://www.opb.org.

The Salt
1:51 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Army Corps Project Pits Farmland Against Flood Threat

A truck drives on top of a levee that protects a soybean field in New Madrid County, Mo., when the Mississippi River floods.
Kristofor Husted KBIA

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 11:26 am

For years, some small towns and farmers along the Mississippi River have been battling each other over a flood project set up by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

On the western shore, farmers in southeast Missouri need the project to protect their valuable farmland. But small river towns on the eastern side of the river say the project protects those influential farmers at the cost of their small communities. As a last-ditch effort, the opposition to the project is asking the Environmental Protection Agency to kill the project all together.

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Business
1:50 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Analysts Fear A Prolonged Drop In Oil Prices Will Hurt Oklahoma's Banks

Drilling rigs dot the landscape near Calumet, Okla., in April 2013. Oklahoma's economy blossomed during the domestic fracking boom, but as the price of crude oil drops, that could change.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 12:39 pm

In Oklahoma, a state that largely rode out the recession on a gusher of new-found oil, things may be about to change.

Now it costs more to produce most of Oklahoma's oil than it's worth on the world market. That's triggering a sharp economic reversal, one that some say has the makings of a prolonged downturn.

"Over the last five years, the stars really aligned," says Roy Williams, president of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. "The community's investment in itself just blossomed, the energy industry blossomed."

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Business
1:46 am
Tue February 24, 2015

How Do You Market To Millennials?

NPR recently asked Southern California millennials to share their thoughts on branding and advertising. One attendee got the word from his mother.
Courtesy of one participant

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 8:48 am

For the last few months, NPR has been looking into millennials, as part of our series called New Boom. This group, some 80 million strong, spends over $1 trillion a year by some estimates. So, we wondered: How should brands and advertisers go about reaching millennials if they're so powerful, but also so different, than generations before them?

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U.S.
1:42 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Washington State County Unsure If It Can Take Wave Of North Dakota Crude

Quinault Indian Nation President Fawn Sharp stands on the docks as tribal crabbers unload their catch. The tribe has vowed to fight the oil train-to-ship terminals proposed for Grays Harbor.
Ashley Ahearn KUOW

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 12:42 pm

Oil companies in North Dakota are looking for the fastest and cheapest way to get their product to refineries, and they've set their sights on moving more of their product by rail to the Northwest.

There are six new oil terminals proposed for Washington state. Half of them could be built in the small communities around Grays Harbor, a bay on the Pacific coast about 50 miles north of the mouth of the Columbia River.

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The Salt
3:48 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Acidifying Waters Are Endangering Your Oysters And Mussels

Crew members pull an oyster dredge in Tangier Sound of the Chesapeake Bay near Deal Island, Md., in 2013. A study found that the Chesapeake Bay shellfishery is a "hot zone" for ocean acidification.
Patrick Semansky AP

Bad news for bivalves comes this week from scientists studying ocean acidification.

Ocean water in parts of the world is changing. Its chemistry is very slowly becoming more acidic, like lemon juice, and less alkaline, a la baking soda.

The change so far is small — you wouldn't notice if you swam in the ocean or even drank it (not recommended, in any case). But numerous scientific studies show that it could get worse. One reason is that as humans produce more carbon dioxide, a lot is absorbed into the oceans. That makes the water more acidic.

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Your Money
3:31 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Reining In Financial Advisers May Help — But Americans Still Aren't Saving

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 4:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
3:31 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Now You Can Sign Up To Keep Drones Away From Your Property

A staff member from DJI Technology Co. demonstrates a drone in Shenzhen, in southern China's Guangdong province. A new website lets people request that drones stay away from their property.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 10:12 am

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Business
2:38 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

New Consumer Protections Hold Financial Advisors To Stricter Standards

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 12:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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The Salt
11:48 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Freight Farms: How Boston Gets Local Greens, Even When Buried In Snow

Freight Farms are shipping containers modified to grow stacks of hydroponic plants and vegetables — anywhere, 365 days a year.
Courtesy of Freight Farms

The United States imports more than $100 billion of food every year from farms across the globe, often in the big metal shipping containers you see on cargo ships. Now, entrepreneurs are using those shipping containers to grow local produce.

"Freight Farms" are shipping containers modified to grow stacks of hydroponic plants and vegetables. It's a new way for small-scale farmers to grow crops year-round in a computer-controlled environment, even in the middle of the city.

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