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Whatever comes of the latest bailout plan for Greece, it may not be enough to save the country's economy, a new report from the International Monetary Fund says.

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Today for the last time, soldiers - toy soldiers - opened the doors of a New York City icon.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Are you ready to do it one more time?

(APPLAUSE)

MAN: Guys, come on in. Welcome to FAO.

(APPLAUSE)

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In Athens today, there were protests outside the Greek Parliament as its members debated the country's proposed bailout deal.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Chanting in Greek).

Updated at 7:42 p.m. ET

Greece's Parliament approved the controversial austerity measures struck Monday with the country's creditors, but the vote created a rift within the ruling left-wing Syriza party.

"We don't believe in it, but we are forced to adopt it," Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras appealed to lawmakers before the vote.

The vote was 229-64, with six abstentions. Thirty-two of the "no" votes came from Syriza lawmakers; six of them voted present. Also voting "no" were members of the far-right Golden Dawn.

If you've been paying attention to the political news in the past couple of years, you know that the U.S. stands virtually alone in not mandating paid leave of any type for its workers.

Announcing an international takedown of a malware marketplace, federal officials say that the forum called Darkode has been dismantled and dozens of its members have been arrested. Darkode has been a marketplace to purchase and trade hacking tools since at least 2008.

Investigators say that while the forum's existence was widely known, they hadn't been able to penetrate it until recently. Darkode operated under password protections and required referrals to join. On Wednesday, the site consisted of an image saying that it had been seized by authorities.

We know that women and minorities continue to be underrepresented in the STEM fields — that's science, technology, engineering and math. Now dip into #RaceOnTech to find out why. Since Monday, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer scientists and coders from Silicon Valley to Greenbelt, Md., have been sharing their thoughts one tweet at a time.

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Yogurt is a truly living food. The bacteria that transform milk into this thick and sour food also provide a sense of mystique.

For Atanas Valev, they carry the taste and smell of his homeland, Bulgaria. "It's just the smell of the fermented milk. It's tart, tangy tart. That's what yogurt should taste like," he says.

An AP investigation has found that the fewer the airlines that serve an airport, the costlier its flights are. Recent mergers have cut the number of major U.S. air carriers from nine to four.

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It's a funny feeling to step into a darkened gallery, look into a glass case and see colorful foam and rubber sneakers.

But there are plenty of people who revere kicks like holy icons. Sneakerheads, they're called — like Myles Linton, a high school student entering his senior year.

"I've been into sneakers for a couple years now," Linton says. "It's kind of a part of me, a part of my community."

On his feet, he's got a pair of Air Jordan 4 Toros, black and red. He calls them "kinda basic."

Coder boot camps. Accelerated learning programs. New economy skills training.

Whatever you call them, these new players in higher education are multiplying. The intensive programs say they can teach job-ready skills in technology, design and related fields. In record time.

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Is news coverage of Greece wearing you down? Too many deals and deadlines?

It's no wonder. The "Greek debt crisis" has been in progress for nearly six years, making it easy to assume that we're seeing just another crazy episode in a long-running drama.

But European leaders are saying this time it really is different. Here's why:

This spring, Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne fired off an email to the CEO of another major automaker, General Motors' Mary Barra, asking her to consider a merger between his company and hers.

Publicly, GM politely declined the opportunity. Now, Marchionne is trying to get investors to force a shotgun wedding.

Michael Ward, an investment analyst with Sterne Agee, says the answer is a no-brainer.

"Chrysler merger with GM makes absolutely no sense," he says. "Zero sense."

In a Monday speech, Hillary Clinton focused on a trend that millions of Americans know all too intimately: declining incomes.

The Clinton campaign is calling the phenomenon of stagnant wages "the defining economic challenge of our time," and as debates and primaries draw ever closer, it's becoming clear that jump-starting Americans' wages is going to be the defining challenge of the election. Candidates are furiously trying to differentiate themselves on how to deal with unstoppable phenomena.

A Recent, Scary Problem

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The chief executive officer of Nintendo has died. As NPR's Laura Sydell reports, Satoru Iwata was known for his accessibility to fans, and he's being remembered for a playfulness unusual among big company CEOs.

Concerns over the safety of drivers and passengers has prompted Land Rover to issue a recall of more than 65,000 recently made SUVs. The problem stems from keyless entry software that can allow seemingly latched doors to open.

"Some customers have reported that one door has opened while the vehicle was in motion," the company said in an initial report on the flaw in June.

Silicon Valley admits it has a diversity problem. Companies from Google to Facebook to Twitter have reported that a majority of their employees are white males.

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In a news conference early Monday morning, eurozone leaders announced that they would give Greece another bailout — as long as the government of Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras manages to implement a round of austerity measures in the coming days, says European Council President Donald Tusk.

The new deal estimates that Greece will need up to $96 billion in emergency funding in the next three years, Jake Cigainero reports for NPR. Lawmakers in Athens by Wednesday will need to pass pension overhauls and sales-tax increases that voters overwhelmingly rejected in a recent referendum.

Two years ago, in the middle of the night, a fire broke out in a commercial building on the northern edge of the city of Dallas. It destroyed a small yogurt company called Three Happy Cows.

Two months later, Edgar Diaz, the founder of Three Happy Cows, confessed that he'd set the fire. Yet people who knew Diaz, and had worked with him, could not believe it.

"I was like, Edgar did that? No way! No way. No way," says Ruth Cruz, who worked at Three Happy Cows.

"No. No. It was his baby. Couldn't imagine," says Don Seale, who supplied milk to the factory.

Nintendo Chief Satoru Iwata Dies At 55

Jul 12, 2015

Satoru Iwata, the president and CEO of Nintendo for more than a decade, has died at the age of 55.

"Nintendo Co., Ltd. deeply regrets to announce that President Satoru Iwata passed away on July 11, 2015 due to a bile duct growth," the video game company announced Sunday night in a very brief statement.

In 1872, Victoria Claflin Woodhull became the first woman to run for president — before women even had the right to vote.

Campaigning as a member of the Equal Rights Party on a platform of women's suffrage and labor reforms, the election came and went without Woodhull receiving any electoral votes, but Woodhull became the first of a small club of women who have run for the United States' highest office.

Matthew Rearley plays Minecraft every day, sometimes for eight hours at a time, but he's never gamed like this before. In a movie theater full of competitors, the 15-year-old's eyes shift constantly between the computer in his lap and the 50-foot-tall screen in front of him.

"Gaming with other people, it becomes more professional," Rearley says. "The general experience of having the big screen there and sitting in a chair like this — it's a big, big game-changer."

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