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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Trump administration has decided to hold off on imposing most of its tariffs on imported steel and aluminum until at least June 1.

Tariffs were scheduled to take effect at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday on imports from Canada, the largest U.S. supplier of steel and aluminum, as well as Mexico, Argentina, Australia, Brazil and the EU.

A source familiar with the decision says the administration has reached an agreement in principle with Australia, Argentina and Brazil, which may avoid the need for tariffs against those countries altogether.

Plotting A Route For Local Newspapers

Apr 30, 2018

If you want to know what’s happening in the world, now is the best possible time to be alive. A few taps of your fingers (or a short question to your smart speaker) can lead to you being bombarded with information, much of it true.

News, analysis, spin and opinion from across the country and around the world are easier to find than ever. But what about news from your own community?

Many local newspapers are struggling to stay profitable. And many others are closing.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every year, the average American buys a certain amount of goods and services. Inflation measures how the prices of those goods and services are changing.

The Federal Reserve has a target for inflation. It wants us at that sweet spot, where the economy is purring along, but not going so fast that it's in danger of overheating.

That sweet spot is two percent. And we hit that today. Which is great news. The question is, what does the Fed do now to keep us there?

Russia and Saudi Arabia have been longtime adversaries over geopolitics and military operations in the Middle East. Now, they've formed a surprising bond that is reshaping global oil markets.

As two of the world's largest oil producers, they have engineered significant production cuts to mop up an oil glut that had been keeping energy prices low for years. The unexpected alliance is one of the reasons motorists in the U.S. have seen prices at the pump climb 18 percent over the past year.

Copyright 2018 Wisconsin Public Radio. To see more, visit Wisconsin Public Radio.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Updated at 3:07 p.m. ET

T-Mobile and Sprint have reached a "definitive agreement" to merge in an all-stock deal, which would create a new company with a total value of $146 billion, based on current stock prices.

Updated on Monday at 12:09 p.m. ET

President Trump's absence for the second year in a row from the annual White House Correspondents' dinner may end up being the least controversial thing about Saturday night's gathering of the White House press corps.

The homeless population in most of the country has been declining for years, thanks to a strong economy and a low unemployment rate. But in Los Angeles County, the homeless population has been rising fast--nearly 25% in the last year.

A team from USC set out to figure out what was going on. They launched a big survey to ask people how they had ended up on the street. They found that the new homeless population has changed. A lot of homeless people are educated, have jobs, and many are elderly.

Half of them had become homeless for the first time in just the last 30 days.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren sent a letter to the Trump administration's top consumer protection official late Thursday asking him whether he is doing the bidding of the industries he is supposed to be policing.

The move was in response to remarks about lobbyists made earlier this week by the acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Mick Mulvaney.

Earlier this week, Mulvaney told a group of bankers and lobbyists that when he was a Republican congressman he would only talk to lobbyists who gave money to his election campaign.

Safety officials have lifted an evacuation order for miles around an oil refinery in Superior, Wis., after an explosion and a large fire erupted Thursday at the Canadian-owned facility. Police officers went door to door to enforce the evacuation, which extended for miles around the refinery.

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Comfort Zone.

About Tim Ferriss's TED Talk

How can we conquer our fears? Entrepreneur Tim Ferriss says that by taking action, we can train ourselves to accept discomfort, become more resilient, and expand our horizons.

About Tim Ferriss

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Comfort Zone.

About Tanya Menon's TED Talk

Humans naturally seek out cliques or in-groups. But organizational psychologist Tanya Menon encourages us to break out of our social comfort zones, for wider opportunties to grow.

About Tanya Menon

U.S. economic growth slowed in the first three months of the year to a 2.3 percent annual rate, down from 2.9 percent at the end of last year.

One reason is that consumers didn't keep up with the blistering pace of spending at the beginning of the year, which means slower economic growth overall, analysts say. But, if recent trends are any indication, the economy will pick up steam soon.

Amazon demolished Wall Street's profit expectations for its first quarter, thanks to a boom in online sales and huge demand for its cloud services.

NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports for our Newscast unit that the retail giant's profits more than doubled from a year ago.

Updated 3:55 p.m. ET

A woman who worked as an NBC correspondent says longtime network anchor Tom Brokaw made unwanted advances, including groping her and trying forcibly to kiss her, some two decades ago. Brokaw denied the claims in a email to his colleagues on Friday.

Linda Vester, who covered the Middle East and Africa for NBC and later joined Fox News, was in her 20s at the time she alleges Brokaw made the advances, Variety magazine reports.

University of Michigan students Griffin St. Onge and Lauren Schandevel have published an online guide that anybody can edit called "Being Not Rich at UM." It's a Google Doc about navigating the costs of college that has grown to more than 80 pages.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Updated at 9:25 p.m. ET

Wembley, London's iconic national stadium, could soon be owned by an American.

The Football Association of England, which owns the stadium, said it had received an offer from Shahid Khan, the billionaire owner of the NFL's Jacksonville Jaguars. Wembley is home to England's national football team.

Andrew Puzder, like Ronny Jackson, knows what it is like to be nominated for a Cabinet position, but to have those hopes dashed before a confirmation hearing. Last year, he was President Trump’s pick for Labor Secretary when allegations about his private and professional life led him to withdraw his nomination.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

California's cities are in a housing crisis. Almost everyone agrees there aren't enough homes being built. Rents and home prices are skyrocketing, and there's not enough low-income housing to go around.

The California Senate recently voted on a bill to allow construction of apartment buildings near transportation hubs. Senator after senator spoke about the need for more homes. And then rejected the bill.

We asked UCLA's Paavo Monkkonen why Californians say they want more housing, but then reject attempts to make that happen.

Ford Motor Co. reported a $1.7 billion profit for the first quarter of 2018, but the company says it's planning big changes — such as phasing out all cars except for the Mustang and a crossover vehicle in the North American market, so it can focus on SUVs and trucks.

"Given declining consumer demand and product profitability, the company will not invest in next generations of traditional Ford sedans for North America," Ford said.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Despite criticism for sharing disinformation and sharing people's data, Facebook reported another quarter of record earnings. NPR's Aarti Shahani reports.

When a consumer has a complaint about a bank, whether it's dealing with a mortgage or a credit card, right now there's a place to lodge that complaint online.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reported an unusual discovery on Monday. The founder, editor and columnist of a website that bills itself as a resource for student loan news does not exist.

Note: This episode originally ran in 2015.

California is looking at a drought again. The last drought in California made life inconvenient in a lot of ways, from water rationing to taps actually running dry.

The thing is, then and now, there's actually still water in the ground. There are water aquifers literally underneath many of those homes with empty faucets. But the water level has gotten so low that they can't reach it anymore.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Outside of Cheyenne, Wyoming is an 8,900-acre former ranch where cattle and horses once roamed. Now it's just open land with nothing but grass. When the owner passed away he didn't have a succession plan. With no obvious heirs, a family member sold it. It eventually became subdivided and a realty company now advertises it for redevelopment primarily as retirement or vacation properties.

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