Business

Business
3:58 am
Wed December 12, 2012

Tax Deductions And The Fiscal Cliff

Originally published on Wed December 12, 2012 5:20 am

Morning Edition continues with the latest installment of its series: The Twelve Days of Deductions. It's a nod to the many deductions, credits and other tax breaks that political leaders are weighing as they continue their negotiations to avoid the "fiscal cliff."

Around the Nation
3:56 am
Wed December 12, 2012

Is California Up Next For An Oil And Gas Boom?

Originally published on Wed December 12, 2012 4:05 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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NPR Story
3:56 am
Wed December 12, 2012

Do Unions Still Have Clout In Michigan?

Originally published on Wed December 12, 2012 5:27 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The contentious fight over labor rights has been unfolding throughout the Midwest in the last couple of years. Michigan is only the latest example.

NPR's national political correspondent Don Gonyea joins us now to explore the broader impact of all this. Good morning, Don.

DON GONYEA, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: So how is what has happened in Michigan different from what we've seen over the past couple of years in Wisconsin and Ohio, where Republican governors also took on labor unions?

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Business
3:38 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

HSBC Officials Knowingly Dealt With Iranian Banks

Originally published on Wed December 12, 2012 2:57 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

More now on the HSBC case and, more broadly, on what banks are obliged to do and what HSBC did not do. Jimmy Gurule is a professor of law at Notre Dame University law school, used to be undersecretary for enforcement at the Department of the Treasury. Welcome to the program.

JIM GURULE: Thank you.

SIEGEL: And first, someone makes a big deposit at a big bank. What must the bank do and what must it know about that deposit?

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Business
3:38 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

Small Businesses Might Still Hire If Taxes Are Raised

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 7:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now to one of the big sticking points in Washington these days. Much of the debate over impending tax hikes and budget cuts centers on the tax rate for top earners. President Obama argues the tax rate for income over $250,000 a year should be allowed to go up. Republicans say there should be no change in tax rates. When Democrats talk about raising taxes on the wealthy, Republicans hear it as raising taxes on small businesses and killing jobs.

Well, NPR's S.V. Date has been exploring that argument.

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Business
3:38 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

U.S. Officials Hope HSBC Penalty Sends A Message

Originally published on Wed December 12, 2012 2:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. It is the biggest penalty ever paid by a bank to the U.S. government. HSBC, a British company, will hand over $1.9 billion to settle a money laundering case. The Justice Department says HSBC violated the bank secrecy act and the trading with the enemy act by doing business with the likes of Iran.

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Business
3:38 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

Big Stores Changed Retail With Hands-On Shopping

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 7:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to get a little help now from Ebenezer Scrooge to set up this next conversation.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "A CHRISTMAS CAROL")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as Ebenezer Scrooge) I will live in the past, the present and the future. The spirits of all three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach.

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Law
12:12 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

What Changes In Right-To-Work States?

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 2:26 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

CONAN: That was the scene this morning outside the Michigan statehouse in Lansing as activists protested the legislature's work on two bills to rewrite the state's labor laws and make Michigan the 24th state in the country to become a right to work state. Rick Pluta, the managing editor and statehouse bureau chief for Michigan Public Radio Network, joins us now by phone from the statehouse. Nice to have you on the program today.

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Economy
9:56 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Are 'Fiscal Cliff' Conversations Going Anywhere?

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 2:08 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. The latest unemployment numbers are out and while things are getting slightly better overall, younger people who want to work are still having a very tough time. We reached out to an economist who says apprenticeships might offer one way to offer more opportunity to the younger trying to get into the world of work. We'll talk more about that in just a few minutes.

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Money Coach
9:56 am
Tue December 11, 2012

'Tis The Season To Avoid Charity Scams

Originally published on Thu December 20, 2012 9:13 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to talk about those new unemployment numbers. Last week, we learned that the national unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7 percent. That's the lowest level in four years. But the cheering hasn't started for one group of people, the youngest workers, or would-be workers.

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Economy
9:56 am
Tue December 11, 2012

You're Hired! Apprenticeships And Unemployed Youth

Originally published on Thu December 20, 2012 9:13 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Later in the program, you might think of apprenticeships as something out of the era of blacksmithing and barrel-making, but our next guest says it's time for this type of employment to make a comeback.

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Delta Makes Deal To Buy 49 Percent Of Virgin Atlantic

Two bag tags that may soon be together a lot.
Photo illustration by Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Looking to grab more of "the lucrative New York-to-London market," Delta Air Lines said today that it plans to spend $360 million for a 49 percent stake in Virgin Atlantic.

As USA Today writes:

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It's All Politics
9:49 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Fiscal Cliff Calendar: What Happens When

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 11:39 am

As weary as many Americans grew of campaign commercials last month, they may be getting even more annoyed this month by endless talk of the fiscal cliff, the massive collection of tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect at year's end.

It's easy to understand the urge to stick fingers in ears and loudly chant "la-la-la-la." The budget problems are indeed complicated, and the negotiations tedious.

But resolving the mess is extremely important: Without a solution, every person who gets a paycheck or has investments will see his or her taxes rise.

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Business
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Could The Opportunity Credit Be Eliminated?

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS")

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As we head into the holiday season, political leaders are un-merrily locked in a battle over how to cut federal spending and raise revenue - and this could mean meddling with tax deductions that many Americans hold dear.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So this week and next, we're taking a closer look at individual deductions and tax credits that might be on the chopping block.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS")

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Business
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Climbing Corporate Ladder Is Slow Going For Women

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A new report out this morning finds women are still not making much progress moving up the corporate ladder. Only a small number of senior executives at Fortune 500 companies are women, and the nonprofit group Catalyst shows the number has not changed much in years. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Around the Nation
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Right-To-Work Measure Expected To Pass In Michigan

A right-to-work protester walks past Michigan state police at the capitol in Lansing on Tuesday. The Michigan Legislature is expected to pass legislation Tuesday that would bar contracts requiring employees to pay union dues as a condition of employment.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 11:29 am

Michigan's Legislature is expected to pass legislation Tuesday that would bar contracts requiring employees to pay union dues as a condition of employment. The proposed right-to-work law has infuriated union leaders in a state considered the heart of the union movement.

Republican leaders pushing the bill closely watched the fights over labor rights going on across the Midwest, but it wasn't Ohio or Wisconsin that prompted them into action. Many leaders in the public and private sector looked to their neighbor to the immediate south.

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Business
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a controversial battery buy.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Economy
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

The 'Fiscal Cliff' For English Majors

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's take that idea of playing out a little further now. The budget standoff has been described in all sorts of dramatic terms. So we decided to look into what the great works of the stage can tell us about this debate over tax hikes and spending cuts, and how it will play out. Think of it as "The Fiscal Cliff for English Majors."

NPR White House correspondent - and English major - Ari Shapiro has this take.

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Business
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

HSBC Agrees to Settle Money-Laundering Case

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

British banking giant, HSBC, will pay 1.9 billion dollars to the U.S. to settle allegations of money laundering. In a statement released overnight, the bank said it accepts responsibility for past mistakes. U.S. officials will have further details of the settlement later today. NPR's Jim Zarroli has more.

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Business
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

SEC Head Schapiro To Step Down This Week

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

David Greene talks to Mary Schapiro, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, about her tenure. After almost four years on the job she is stepping down this week.

Business
4:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: lost down under.

Back in September, iPhone users slammed Apple for its new map app, which replaced Google Maps in a software update.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:26 am
Tue December 11, 2012

The Lost Art Of Budget Negptoatopms

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama and House speaker John Boehner have been holding private conversations about how to avoid the fiscal cliff, but still no deal. That has many in Washington talking about how it wasn't always so difficult to get things done. For some insight, we called John Danforth. He's a former Republican senator from Missouri and spent decades forging deals across the aisle, including the 1986 tax reform law under President Reagan. As he sees it, lawmakers aren't approaching the current problem from the right angle.

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Economy
3:23 am
Tue December 11, 2012

What Happens If We Fall Off The 'Fiscal Cliff?'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 8:55 am

Lines of communication remain open in an effort to avert the automatic tax hikes and spending cuts known as the "fiscal cliff," according to the White House and House Speaker John Boehner.

If no deal is reached between now and the end of the year, would the consequences be that drastic?

To answer that question, let's imagine it's January and the nation has gone off the "fiscal cliff." You don't really feel any different and things don't look different, either. That's because, according to former congressional budget staffer Stan Collender, the cliff isn't really a cliff.

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The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

U.S. Treasury To Sell Remaining Stake In AIG

In a statement on Monday, the U.S. Treasury Department said it will launch an underwritten public offering to sell its remaining 234,169,156 common stock shares in insurer American International Group Inc., better known as AIG.

The U.S. government bought the controlling stake in the company as part of the $182 billion bank bailout in 2008. The sale would bring an end to the government's run as the company's largest shareholder, which represented a 16-percent ownership in the company.

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The Two-Way
3:32 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Reports: $1.9 Billion Settlement Expected In HSBC Money-Laundering Case

The $1.9 billion settlement from British banking firm HSBC will settle allegations of allowing money laundering and transfers of billions from Iran.
Timur Emek Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 9:06 am

  • Jim Zarroli on 'Morning Edition'

Update at 7 a.m. ET, Dec. 11. Settlement Announced:

Saying that "we accept responsibility for our past mistakes," the chief executive of Britain's HSBC has confirmed that the banking giant will pay a record $1.9 billion to settle charges related to a money laundering scheme in the U.S.

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All Tech Considered
2:43 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Forget The Register: Stores Use Mobile To Make Sales On The Spot

A Nordstrom salesperson shows a customer an online selection of shoes on an in-store iPad. Like some other retailers, Nordstrom is using mobile devices to make on-the-spot sales and check companywide product inventory instantly.
Courtesy of Nordstrom

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 6:44 pm

The women's shoe department at Nordstrom's flagship store in Seattle is bustling. Shoppers are trying on everything from stilettos to rain boots — and when they're ready to buy, they can pay up right where they are.

The sales associate simply whips out a modified iPod Touch and scans the shoe box's bar code. The handheld device contains a credit card reader, too, so the customer can just hand over the plastic and sign with a fingertip. There's no trek to the cash register and no line to wait in.

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Economy
10:00 am
Mon December 10, 2012

Fiscal Cliff: Cutting the Untouchable?

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 10:46 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we'll hear about elections in Ghana. We'll talk about whether the election of President John Dramani Mahama to a new term confirms the country's reputation for leadership in democratic processes, or perhaps undermines it. That's later.

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Africa
10:00 am
Mon December 10, 2012

Trying To Reform Nigeria Amid Family Kidnapping

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 10:46 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We want to turn now from Ghana to Nigeria, where there is disturbing news. The mother of Nigeria's finance minister, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, was kidnapped this weekend. Police say they've launched a massive search to find her.

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Europe
9:47 am
Mon December 10, 2012

Spain's Crisis Leads To Rise Of Grass-Roots Groups

A demonstrator shouts during a protest against housing evictions in Madrid last month. The sign to his right reads, "Stop evictions."
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 6:44 pm

A year and a half ago, recession-ravaged Spanish society reacted to the economic crisis with the "Indignados," a mass protest that inspired the worldwide "Occupy" movement.

The "angry ones" are long gone from Spanish streets, but they've evolved into many grass-roots associations now filling the gaps left by the eroding welfare state, spawning a new form of anti-austerity resistance that embraces all branches of society, from those who have lost homes to foreclosures, to the entire judiciary.

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The Salt
9:22 am
Mon December 10, 2012

Want To Find A Restaurant That Treats Workers Well? There's An App For That

A group that advocates on behalf of food service workers has created an app that helps diners find restaurants that pay their workers livable wages and offer room for advancement.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 6:42 am

Smartphone users have a wide range of apps to choose from if they're looking to dine ethically. There are apps that advise which supermarkets have good environmental records and apps that keep tabs on restaurants and markets offering sustainable seafood.

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