Business

Business
4:21 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:59 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big patent ruling.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: This is a case of Apple against Samsung - and if that sounds familiar, it's because there's more than one patent case here.

While a jury in California deliberates a huge multibillion dollar patent infringement case, which we've been discussing this week, a ruling on a similar case with the same players has been issued today in South Korea.

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Business
4:21 am
Fri August 24, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 9:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: duh. That's right, D-U-H.

That's a Colombian beer, and it's at the center of a brewing legal battle between two businessmen and 20th Century Fox. The golden ale was originally called Duff Beer, and it looks just like the beer served up at Moe's Tavern on "The Simpsons." But 20th Century Fox complained that the two brothers who founded the company were infringing on a trademark here - Duff, it's from "The Simpsons." So the brothers said they changed the name to DuH.

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Politics
3:59 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Democrats, GOP Need Donors For Party Conventions

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 9:56 am

The Democratic and Republican parties are preparing for their respective nominating conventions in Tampa, Florida, and Charlotte, North Carolina. That means each side will depend, as usual, on donors to help pay for the events.

Planet Money
1:45 am
Fri August 24, 2012

In The Kitchen With The Inventor Of Steak-Umm

Eugene Gagliardi
Joshua Marston

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:08 am

One night in the late 1960s, Eugene Gagliardi was lying awake in bed trying to figure out how to save his company. He was thinking about the Philly cheesesteak.

Gagliardi ran a family business that sold hamburgers and other meat to restaurant chains in the Philadelphia area. But within the span of a few months, the company had lost several of its biggest customers.

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All Tech Considered
1:18 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Is The Cloud In Gamers' Future?

Nintendo's Wii U is the only new game system on the horizon as console makers are having a hard time figuring out how to improve on what they've got.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 9:56 am

Last year, consumers spent $17 billion on video games. That sounds like a lot, but it was nearly $1.5 billion lower than the previous year. One reason: there haven't been any new game consoles out to excite buyers.

Only Nintendo's Wii U might be on shelves for the holiday season.

The console makers are having a hard time figuring out how to improve on what they've got.

Try asking a gamer like Ryan Block what would entice him to drop a few hundred bucks on a new console.

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Business
2:11 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

Bank of America To Donate Some Foreclosed Homes

Originally published on Thu August 23, 2012 3:47 pm

Bank of America announced this week it will give away 2,500 distressed homes to military vets and to other charities for people who are in need.

The Salt
2:10 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

Willing To Play The Dating Game With Your Food? Try A Grocery Auction

Grocery auctions have been growing in popularity as a way to get a lot of food for not a lot of money.
Matt Sindelar for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:56 am

Every year, U.S. grocers discard $10 billion to $15 billion in unsold products. The items might be damaged, discontinued, seasonal or food that's just close to its sell-by date.

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Business
3:14 am
Thu August 23, 2012

Federal Reserve May Move To Boost Economy

Fed policymakers appeared to move closer to a decision to add more stimulus to the economy. That's according to minutes released of the Federal Open Market Committee's meeting. The minutes didn't say what the Fed is likely to do next, but indicated many officials supported keeping the federal funds rate at "exceptionally low levels" at least through late 2014.

Around the Nation
2:52 am
Thu August 23, 2012

Drought's Effects Keep Expanding

Originally published on Thu August 23, 2012 3:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This summer's drought is not helping the wildfire situation, and the drought is also deeply harming the nation's agricultural economy. Parched lands extend from California to Indiana, and from Texas to South Dakota, impacting everyone from farmers and ranchers to barge operators and commodity traders.

As NPR's David Schaper reports, some farmers are getting close to calling it quits.

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: Looking over his small, 100-acre farm near South Union, Kentucky, Rich Vernon doesn't like what he sees.

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Business
2:52 am
Thu August 23, 2012

Judge: Poker Is A Game Of Sklll, Not Luck

Originally published on Thu August 23, 2012 4:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in business brings to mind Matt Damon's character in the poker movie "Rounders."

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "ROUNDERS")

MATT DAMON: (as Mike McDermott) Why does this still seem like gambling to you? I mean, why do you think the same five guys make it to the final table at the World Series of Poker every single year? What are they, the luckiest guys in Las Vegas? It's a skill game.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Planet Money
1:21 am
Thu August 23, 2012

Why Do Taxpayers Subsidize Farmers' Insurance?

Grandpa Traub — corn former and millionaire.
Chana Joffe-Walt NPR

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 8:16 am

This summer's drought has hit more than half the states in the country. Crops are suffering, but farmers might not be. Most farmers have crop insurance.

U.S. taxpayers spend about $7 billion a year on crop insurance. It's our largest farm subsidy.

And this subsidy goes in part to farmers — who will tell you themselves they aren't so sure about the whole idea. "I have an aversion to it," says Jim Traub, a corn and bean farmer in Fairbury, Illinois. "But you're not going to turn it down."

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The Salt
3:38 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

Food Waste Is Overwhelming. Here Are Five Things People Are Doing About It

Rotten jackfruit and tomatoes are sorted at a dump in New Delhi. India loses an estimated 40 percent of its produce harvest for lack of infrastructure. And Americans waste about 40 percent of our food.
Mustafa Quraishi AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 3:39 pm

The food world is buzzing today about the latest news on just how often we waste perfectly good food. And we admit, the statistics are pretty depressing.

About 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. The average American consumer wastes 10 times as much food as someone in Southeast Asia — up 50 percent from Americans in the 1970s. Yet, 1 in 6 Americans doesn't have enough to eat, says the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And food waste costs us about $165 billion a year and sucks up 25 percent of our freshwater supply.

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The Two-Way
3:11 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

Fed Hints At More Action To Boost Economy

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke talks to educators Aug. 7 in Washington, D.C. At their most recent meeting, many Fed members backed action to boost the economy.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

The Federal Reserve could take more steps to boost the struggling U.S. economy. That's according to minutes released Wednesday of the Federal Open Market Committee's July 31-Aug. 1 meeting.

"Many members judged that additional monetary accommodation would likely be warranted fairly soon unless incoming information pointed to a substantial and sustainable strengthening in the pace of the economic recovery," the minutes said. [PDF]

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The Salt
2:28 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

The Spice Man Cometh To Cuba, A Hot Land Of Bland Food

Cuba has tight advertising restrictions, so Cedric Fernando uses his British-made 1955 MG convertible to spread the word about his Indian restaurant, Bollywood, in Havana.
Nick Miroff NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:57 am

Cuba has hot weather, hot music, hot politics and hot Cubans. So why is the food so bland?

Tourists who have visited the island, particularly Cuba's state-run restaurants, know that Cuban chefs are deeply fond of frying their ingredients, but the range of seasonings tends to span from salt to garlic, with not much else in between.

Enter the Spice Man. He is Cedric Fernando, co-proprietor of the first and only Indian restaurant in Cuba, called Bollywood. And he's definitely turning up the heat in the kitchen.

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Law
3:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Jury To Decide Apple's Patent Case Against Samsung

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 2:10 pm

What your next smart phone or tablet computer might look like is in the hands of a California jury. In one of the biggest patent infringement cases ever, Apple is suing Samsung — charging that in creating its products, Samsung ripped off iPhone and iPad technology. Samsung countered with its own allegations.

This case is complex, the legal issues are daunting, and the jury's decision has to be unanimous.

"What's at stake here is the future of smartphones and the tablet market," says intellectual property expert Christopher V. Carani.

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Business
3:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 5:05 am

Congress hasn't agreed on a budget for the next fiscal year. So President Obama is extending a two-year pay freeze for federal workers. That means no raises for federal employees at least until next spring. That's when a short-term budget deal runs out.

Business
3:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Video Game Retail Sales Fall, While Downloads Increase

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 5:03 am

Video games are getting better in terms of quality, so why are sales falling month after month? David Greene talks to Chris Kohler, who writes about video games for Wired Magazine. The two examine the trends and new technologies reshaping this big, and growing industry.

Business
3:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 5:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. And our last word in business today is Wi-Fi donkeys. Just follow along here.

A theme park in Israel called Kfar Kedem, or Village of Yore, depicts life in Israel in the first and second centuries. The Times of Israel describes it as a Galilean version of Colonial Williamsburg.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Asia
3:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Chinese Factories Improve Conditions Where iPads Are Made

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 2:11 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
1:05 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Trying To Tame The (Real) Deadliest Fishing Jobs

Crew members of a scallop boat float in their survival suits during a drill in Point Judith, R.I.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 2:09 pm

On the fishing-boat piers of New England, nearly everyone knows a fisherman who was lost at sea.

Boat captain Joe Neves remembers when a crew member got knocked overboard. "We heard him screaming 'Help me!' " Neves says, grimacing. "But you know, on the water at night, your head is like a little coconut." They didn't find him.

Mike Gallagher discovered a friend who was entangled in still-running hydraulics. "I knew right away he was dead," he says.

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Asia
2:42 pm
Tue August 21, 2012

Apple's China Plants Still Face Union, Overtime Issues

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 5:36 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Apple got something of a report card today. The Fair Labor Association released its latest review of working conditions at three plants in China. The plants are owned by Foxconn, and assemble iPhones and iPads. But an earlier report had put the Chinese company and Apple on notice.

NPR's Steve Henn has this update.

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Energy
2:42 pm
Tue August 21, 2012

BP Recalls Gasoline That May Cause Car Problems

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 5:36 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Time now for a story on the latest recall. It's not food or an appliance. It's gasoline. BP has recalled gasoline that was stored at a facility in northwest Indiana, near Chicago. But tens of thousands of gallons of that gas have already been sold and pumped into gas tanks.

As NPR's Jeff Brady reports, local mechanics are fielding lots of calls from concerned drivers.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:19 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Hospitals Gripe About Health Insurers, Too

When it comes to dealing with insurers, hospitals like some more than others.
iStockphoto.com

It is a truth universally acknowledged that health insurance companies can be a pain for patients. What may be a surprise is that hospitals often complain, too. And the reasons aren't so different from those of consumers: Denied claims. Low reimbursement. Late reimbursement. Thickets of red tape.

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Your Money
9:36 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Refinancing: How To Wade Through The Choppy Waters

Interest rates on mortgages are at an all-time low. But refinancing can be a daunting process. Financial guru and author Louis Barajas speaks with guest host Viviana Hurtado about the ins and outs of refinancing, and what consumers can do to make the process go more smoothly.

Business
2:48 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:01 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a really big apple.

It was bound to happen. Apple has surpassed Microsoft as the most valuable company ever. That happened when Apple stock hit $665 per share yesterday, boosting its market value to nearly $624 billion. Microsoft had held the record for market capitalization since 1999. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Business
2:48 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Drought Dries Up Crops, But Not Airline Schedules

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:01 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The airline industry is having a better than expected summer. Airline stocks have been on the rise and customer service is improving. These days, airlines are less likely to lose your luggage. They're also seeing the highest percent of on-time arrivals since the government started keeping track in the late 1980s.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports the industry is getting some help from an unlikely source.

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NPR Story
2:45 am
Tue August 21, 2012

UCLA's MBA Program Wants To Give Up State Funds

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:01 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The business school at UCLA wants to go into business for itself. The Anderson School of Management is part of a public university. Of course, it's in California and the school's leaders find that being part of public education in California right now is a little maddening. Budget battles and state budget cuts have become normal.

Will Stone reports on what the school wants to do instead.

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NPR Story
2:45 am
Tue August 21, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:01 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: pumped up kicks.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Nike will soon release its priciest shoe.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The latest Lebron James-branded basketball shoe, known as - the Lebron X Nike Plus - is expected to retail for $315. I'm hoping that's for a pair, David, and not per shoe.

Anyway, it apparently includes some motion sensing technology - motion sensing technology that can record how high players jump when wearing them.

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Latin America
2:39 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Cuba Views China, Vietnam As Economic Hope

People, one holding an image of Cuba's President Raul Castro and his brother Fidel Castro, wait in line at a bus stop in Havana last month.
Franklin Reyes AP

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:01 am

Cuba is one of the world's last remaining communist states. Cuba's allies in China and Vietnam also maintain firm one-party rule, but have prospered by introducing market principles to their economic models. With Cuban President Raul Castro easing government controls on property rights and private enterprise, many are wondering if the struggling island is looking to Asia for a way forward.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:28 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Health Law Gives Medicare Fraud Fighters New Weapons

With help from the Affordable Care Act, government fraud investigators will make more use of computer programs to detect Medicare and Medicaid scams.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:01 am

Fighting health care fraud in the U.S. can seem like an endless game of Whack-a-Mole. When government fraud squads crack down on one scheme, another pops up close by.

But the fraud squads that look for scams in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs have some new weapons: tools and funding provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Medicare and Medicaid pay out some $750 billion each year to more than 1.5 million doctors, hospitals and medical suppliers. By many estimates, about $65 billion a year is lost to fraud.

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