Business

Television
4:28 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Why Cable Channels Don't Mind Airing Reruns

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

TV is chock full of reruns, from the recent "CSI" to the vintage "I Love Lucy." It's been that way for years, and is especially so on cable. As NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, one result is that syndication deals have become a much bigger part of the TV business.

ELIZABETH BLAIR, BYLINE: Reruns are no longer seen as filler. Case in point: repeats of "The Big Bang Theory" on cable channel TBS.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE BIG BANG THEORY")

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Space
4:18 am
Fri May 25, 2012

SpaceX Capsule To Dock With Space Station

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 9:13 am

If all continues to go well, a private spacecraft sent to orbit by the company SpaceX is expected to dock with the International Space Station on Friday. The mission is historic because it is the first for the commercial spaceflight industry.

Around the Nation
3:09 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Whirlpool Bets Golf Course Will Help Mich. Town's Economy

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Benton Harbor, Michigan is hosting the Senior PGA Championship, though the economically troubled city may seem like an unlikely place to hold a golf tournament. Benton Harbor is currently in receivership. And it is home to the Whirlpool Corporation, which has moved much of its manufacturing and jobs out of town and overseas. As Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports, Whirlpool executives are hoping the golf tournament will give the town an economic boost.

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Business
3:09 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR business news starts with a venerable newspaper's cutback.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Starting next fall, the New Orleans Times-Picayune will publish only three print issues a week. The 175-year-old paper is the biggest metropolitan newspaper in the country to stop daily circulation. The Times-Picayune's owners cited declining advertising revenues and the need to shift its focus online.

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Business
3:09 am
Fri May 25, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business: Can't buy me love.

Finding love can be hard, and it may be even harder for a wealthy person. According the Society of Single Professionals, quote, "the 1 percent live in constant fear that their money will attract gold diggers, seeking to enrich themselves." But no more. The group has decided to host dating events that cater to wealthy individuals looking for love.

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Asia
2:26 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Hollywood Dreams Led Chinese Firm To Buy Into U.S.

Moviegoers watch a 3-D IMAX movie at a Beijing theater run by the Chinese company Wanda, which recently announced it was buying AMC movie theaters for $2.6 billion. The move is seen as part of a larger effort by the Chinese conglomerate to move into the U.S. market.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:09 am

One of the big movie blockbusters this year isn't a film, but a business deal.

The Chinese company Wanda, one of that country's leading cinema owners, is buying AMC Entertainment, North America's second-largest movie theater company, for $2.6 billion.

When the agreement was announced in China this week, it did not make a lot of sense at first glance. At least for the buyer.

AMC is loaded with some $2 billion in debt, and movie theater attendance in North America was down 4 percent last year.

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Your Money
2:25 am
Fri May 25, 2012

In Tight Credit Market, A Tool For Small Businesses

Many small-business owners have had difficulty securing loans in recent years. One website grades the nation's banks by the ratio of small-business loans to deposits — and finds that community banks are often most friendly to small business.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:09 am

When small-business owners start looking for money to expand, they often begin at a big bank. The banks are highly visible, well-known and often nearby.

But many small-business owners report that they have struggled to get loans in the wake of the economic downturn.

Ami Kassar, CEO of the small-business-loan broker multifunding.com, advises business owners that large banks are "not the best place to start" when looking for a small-business loan.

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Africa
2:06 am
Fri May 25, 2012

How Crumbling U.S. Dollars Bailed Out Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe now uses the U.S. dollar as its main currency, though the bills are often extremely dirty and falling apart due to constant use. Here a cashier holds U.S. dollars in good condition at a supermarket in the capital Harare in 2009.
Kate Holt Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:17 pm

Four years ago, Zimbabwe experienced one of the worst cases of hyperinflation in history. The country abandoned its own currency and switched to the U.S. dollar — a move experts say prevented a complete economic collapse.

But using American dollars has created a host of bizarre issues. The bills are filthy, crumbling and often in short supply. There are no U.S. coins to make change, so chocolate is handed out instead. There is, oddly, an abundance of $2 bills.

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Europe
1:33 am
Fri May 25, 2012

To Tap Arctic Oil, Russia Partners With Exxon Mobil

A Rosneft flag flies over the Russian oil giant's refinery near the city of Samara. Growth of Russia's oil and gas output has stalled, but Exxon Mobil and other foreign firms have signed deals to help exploit the Arctic.
Nikolay Korchekov Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:09 am

Russia is still the world's largest producer of oil and gas, but growth has stalled and to get to new supplies requires going to a very difficult place — the Arctic.

"If you want to be in this business in 2020, 2025, you must think about the Arctic," says Konstantin Simonov, head of the National Energy Security Fund in Moscow.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Radio Legend And Civil Rights Activist Hal Jackson Dies

Radio pioneer and civil rights activist, Hal Jackson, pictured in 1970.
Michael Ochs Photography Getty Images

Hal Jackson, radio pioneer and the first African American to be inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters' Hall Of Fame in 1990, died Wednesday in New York. He was 96 years old.

Jackson spent his career cracking many color barriers, becoming the first African American network radio announcer, first black play-by-play sports announcer and first African American to host an interracial network television show, according to the Radio Hall of Fame, which inducted him in 1995.

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Planet Money
3:06 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Preparing For A Greek Exit, In 3 Easy Steps

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 1:22 pm

"Finance ministers from the 17 countries that use the euro agreed earlier this week on the need to develop national contingency plans in case Greece drops out of the common currency, officials said." - WSJ

This is awkward, because you're really not supposed to talk about this sort of thing out loud. You're supposed to say, as Angela Merkel said again this week, "We want Greece to remain in the eurozone."

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Technology
2:49 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Why Printer Ink Is The Other 'Black Gold'

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 7:37 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now to the liquid gold that has long sustained HP: printer ink. These days, the cost of just a few cartridges can quickly exceed the cost of the printer itself. In fact, Audie, ink is so expensive...

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

How expensive is it, Robert?

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Business
2:48 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

What Will HP's Restructuring Look Like?

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 7:37 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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The Salt
1:53 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

A Meat Mea Culpa: What Went Wrong With 'Pink Slime'

May cover of Meatingplace, the meat processing industry trade magazine
courtesy Meatingplace

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 2:47 pm

It came as no surprise to us when outrage over "pink slime," the catchy nickname given to lean finely textured beef (LFTB), went viral a couple of months ago.

Murky government rules, off-limits meatpacking floors, and a "gotcha" media mentality have created a fear and mistrust that's left the public highly opinionated but often woefully misinformed about where our food comes from.

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Game Changers
9:53 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Keys To Success From BJ's CEO: Be Nice, Speak Up

Laura Sen is president and CEO of BJ's Wholesale Club.
Courtesy of BJ's Wholesale Club

May is Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. All month, Tell Me More is talking to people who trace their heritage to that part of the world and have changed the game in various fields.

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Business
2:48 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Outlook For Housing Industry Appears Promising

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 4:17 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A lot of housing news is out this week and all of it is looking surprisingly good. Sales of new and older homes both saw gains. And two reports showed prices rising.

NPR's Chris Arnold has more.

CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE: The question is: Can this last? And some people who've studied housing for decades think that maybe it can.

William Weaton is an economist at MIT.

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Business
2:48 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 5:30 am

The world's leading PC manufacturer has announced it will lay off 27,000 workers over the next two years — a third of those job cuts will be in the U.S. The CEO of Hewlett-Packard says the layoffs are part of a restructuring that will include greater spending on research and development.

NPR Story
2:43 am
Thu May 24, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 12:26 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is Robocop car.

American customers have not been able to buy a new Chevrolet Caprice since 1996. Now the car is back, as a police car. The 2012 Chevrolet Caprice PPV and Detective goes beyond the old black-and-white. Its computer system is voice activated, "Knight Rider"-style. It has eight cameras positioned to scan thousands of license plates per shift, which police computers can then check against a database to find if drivers have outstanding warrants or tickets.

NPR Story
2:43 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Ripple Effect Of Greek Debt Crisis May Hit U.S.

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 5:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Thursday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Around the Nation
12:50 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Teaching Teens To Build Hammers Home A Message

Domingo Williams, a participant in the Sasha Bruce Youthwork program, gathers wood to help rebuild a gutted house in the Southeast neighborhood of Washington, D.C.
Emily Bogle NPR

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 4:17 am

Teenagers in Washington, D.C., face tough odds getting a job. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, nearly half of those looking for work can't find it — the highest rate in the country.

Sasha Bruce Youthwork, an organization that works with troubled teens in the district, is trying to address that problem by training young people in the construction trades.

The group has enlisted an army of volunteers and a handful of trainees for what it calls a "blitz build" — an effort to rebuild a gutted house in a single day.

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Planet Money
12:47 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Bankrupt In Paradise

A rainbow over the sea in Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands.
Koichi Kamoshida Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 7:05 am

The Northern Mariana Islands are about 4,000 miles west of Hawaii. They look like the kind of tropical islands you see in the movies with bright blue water and white sand beaches.

The people who live on the islands are American. The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands is a U.S. territory. And just like a lot of U.S. states, the commonwealth has a pension plan for its government employees.

Sixto Igisomar used to run it.

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Business
2:53 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

Facebook Underwriters Sued For Hiding Information

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 5:22 pm

Shares of Facebook on Wednesday made up a little of the ground they've lost since the company's troubled stock offering last week. But the company and its lead underwriter, Morgan Stanley, still face a lot of legal problems.

Some of the investors who bought shares of the company filed a lawsuit alleging that the two companies concealed information about Facebook's expected performance.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

HP Will Cut 8 Percent Of Workforce Or 27,000 Jobs

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:49 pm

As part of what it calls "a multi-year restructuring," Hewlett-Packard announced it was cutting 27,000 jobs or 8 percent of its workforce.

HP said the cuts would happen over an extended period and should be done by the end of 2014.

"The restructuring is expected to generate annualized savings in the range of $3.0 to $3.5 billion exiting fiscal year 2014, of which the majority will be reinvested back into the company," the company said in a statement.

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The Salt
1:27 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

Many Americans Say Doing Taxes Is Easier Than Eating Right

Filing your taxes may be a dreaded task. But eating healthy can be an even bigger struggle for many Americans.

According to the results of a new survey of more than 1,000 Americans, almost half of us think its harder to eat right than do our taxes. And genderwise, 55 percent of men say it's harder to figure out what you should be eating than it is to figure out how to do your own taxes. For women, it's slightly lower, at 48 percent. The survey comes from the folks at the International Food Information Council Foundation.

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The Salt
10:27 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Sodexo's Beef With Food Certification Programs

Think these labels we found on foods inside an NPR refrigerator are a lot to digest? Try balancing these considerations with the demands of 50 million diners a day.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:42 am

Surely you've noticed the proliferation of certifications advertising farmers' and food companies' virtuous commitments to fix the environment or promote health. These seals can reassure, but the sheer volume of them can also confound. How to choose between grass-fed, organic, hormone-free or free range?

Now imagine that you have to feed 50 million people a day in 80 countries around the world. And every day more of those people are demanding that the food you serve them be organic, gluten-free, or fair trade.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Wall Street Titans, Behaving Badly

Television correspondent Sabrina Quagliozzi reports from inside the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square on Monday.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:30 am

The pillars of Wall Street are shaking.

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Business
2:41 am
Wed May 23, 2012

CBO Report: U.S. Economy Could Slide Into Recession

The Congressional Budget Office is warning the U.S. economy could fall back into a recession if Washington doesn't address the looming fiscal crisis. The Bush-era tax cuts are supposed to expire as is a temporary reduction in the payroll tax. Meanwhile, deep cuts in federal spending are supposed to take place if Congress and the White House can't agree on a debt-reduction plan.

Around the Nation
2:41 am
Wed May 23, 2012

VA Offers Training To Clergy To Minister To Vets

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 3:00 am

Veterans dealing with the trauma of war will often turn to a priest or pastor of their church for guidance before going to a mental health professional. Experts say that type of support can be especially important in rural areas that aren't near a VA medical center.

NPR Story
2:27 am
Wed May 23, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 4:22 am

Gucci sued Guess over trademark infringement, citing multiple cases of designs it claimed were "studied imitations of Gucci trademarks

Around the Nation
1:38 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Fight Over Flame Retardants In Furniture Heats Up

More than 80 percent of furniture sold in the U.S. is treated with flame-retardant chemicals.
Steve Mullis/NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:41 am

If you pick up a cushion from any sofa or piece of furniture that has foam, you're likely to find a small white tag that reads: "This article meets all flammability requirements of California Bureau of Home Furnishings technical bulletin 117."

The law, referred to as TB 117, was passed in California in 1975. It says that the foam inside upholstered furniture must be able to resist a flame, such as from a cigarette lighter or a candle. Rather than make different furniture just for California, big furniture makers adhere to those standards in all 50 states and even Canada.

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