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Updated at 6:01 p.m. ET

Major stock indexes dropped sharply Friday, with the Dow Jones industrial average tumbling 666 points amid signs that wage growth is finally picking up.

The 2.6 percent drop in the Dow came as the Labor Department reported that 200,000 jobs were added to the economy last month, which was stronger than expected, and the unemployment rate stayed at 4.1 percent — the lowest since 2000.

The business editor of the Los Angeles Times made a triumphant return to the newsroom to applause Thursday after several days away, telling colleagues she had been whisked away and suspended as part of the newspaper's investigation into the leak of taped remarks made by the paper's editor-in-chief in November.

The U.S. added 200,000 jobs in January, continuing the trend of steady job growth for another month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Friday.

That means the economy has now added jobs for 88 months in a row. And, significantly, wages are on the rise, too.

Average hourly earnings rose by 9 cents to $26.74, with a year-over-year growth of 2.9 percent — the highest rate of growth the BLS recorded since June 2009.

The unemployment rate held steady at 4.1 percent.

Cold-pressed juice fills refrigerator cases at juice bars, health food shops, even big box stores – especially at the beginning of the year, when people are trying to "cleanse" after holiday excess.

At the beach in Magens Bay, St. Thomas, the party is back on. It's one of the Virgin Islands' most popular beaches and by noon on a recent weekday, it's already busy. Reggae-inspired hip hop is playing as pickup trucks converted into taxis bring visitors direct from the cruise ship docks. Chris Dimopoulos runs the bar, serving up margaritas, rum punches and something called the painkiller.

"We're seeing a recovery slowly but surely. Every day gets a little bit better," he says.

In the last three months of 2017, Amazon saw its profit more than double to reach a record of $1.9 billion. The company's sales continued to soar during the holiday quarter as more people signed up for its fast-delivery Prime program and bought its voice-activated device Echo.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says recent changes to the site have reduced the amount of time users spend there — a development he says he expected, and one he welcomes as good for both his business and the health of society at large.

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Today's indicator is $2.2 trillion. That's about how much stuff — goods and services — the U.S. sells to the rest of the world every year.

That figure captures not only airplanes and cars, but also some visits to Disney World. Also, blood. Lots of blood.

Our guest is Charles Kenny of the Center for Global Development.

The death of a former major league baseball player in his native Venezuela this week is renewing concerns over the Latin American country's growing health crisis amid ongoing economic and political turmoil.

When President Emmanuel Macron set out to overhaul France's notoriously rigid labor laws last fall, unions promised crippling strikes to stop him.

All of France, it seemed, was waiting for the showdown.

After all, the country's powerful unions have stopped French leaders from overhauling their cherished work code for decades. In 2016, a succession of strikes and 14 nationwide protests snuffed out President François Hollande's hopes for simplifying the 3,000-page employment code.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET Friday with Amazon's statement

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted Amazon two patents for wristbands that could track the exact location of warehouse workers' hands — and give workers tactile feedback to help guide them to a specific shelf.

A California appeals court has found the dating app Tinder's pricing model to be discriminatory and says the company must stop charging older customers more for its paid premium service.

Tinder has argued that the pricing difference on its Tinder Plus service was based on market research finding "customers age 30 and younger have less capacity to pay for premium services" and they "need a lower price to pull the trigger."

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The single most powerful individual in the global economy leaves office this week.

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The Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program, known best for its red, yellow and green sustainable seafood-rating scheme, is unveiling its first Seafood Slavery Risk Tool on Thursday. It's a database designed to help corporate seafood buyers assess the risk of forced labor, human trafficking and hazardous child labor in the seafood they purchase.

A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., has ruled that the independent structure of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau — which forbids the president to remove its director except for certain causes — is constitutional. That's a setback for the agency's critics in the financial industry and the Trump administration.

Janet Yellen chaired her final Federal Reserve policymaking meeting Wednesday. She and her Fed colleagues held interest rates steady and officially elected Jerome Powell to succeed her as chair. As Yellen steps down, she is getting high marks for her four years at the helm of the nation's central bank.

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President Trump says now is the time to fix the nation's crumbling roads and bridges. Here's part of what he said last night in his State of the Union address.

(SOUNDBITE OF 2018 STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS)

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It's Janet Yellen's last week running the Federal Reserve.

On today's show, we focus on a single speech Yellen gave last year.

In the speech, Yellen lays out one of the most baffling mysteries in the American economy right now.

Also, the speech reveals a certain boldness that Yellen brought to the job. Superficially, it looks like one more speech about monetary policy. But look a little deeper and you see Yellen is asking some radical questions.

Xerox is one of the United States' most recognizable companies — its name is synonymous with "photocopy." Now, the company that pioneered the computer mouse and other office technology will shed its independence, and come under the Japanese company Fujifilm's control in a $6.1 billion deal.

Fujifilm and Xerox established the Fuji Xerox joint venture in 1962. Fujifilm owns 75 percent of that joint venture. In the deal announced Wednesday, Fuji Xerox will buy back that stake from Fujifilm, and Fujifilm will use those profits to purchase 50.1 percent of Xerox shares.

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As Yellen Exits Fed, Policymakers Hold Interest Rates Steady

Jan 31, 2018

Updated at 2:09 p.m. ET

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen led her last policy meeting on Wednesday as the finale to a two-day meeting on interest rates, which began Tuesday.

Policymakers left rates unchanged, as analysts had expected. But the Fed said inflation is "expected to move up this year."

The Fed signaled that a gradual tightening of monetary policy is coming as the U.S. economy keeps expanding and job growth continues to be solid.

In his first State of the Union address on Tuesday night, President Trump focused on jobs and the economy, infrastructure, immigration, trade and national security. NPR journalists specializing in these areas and more have added context and analysis to his remarks.

Editor's note: The transcript will be updated. While we are working to correct errors, it may contain discrepancies and typographical errors.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott requested on Tuesday that the Texas Rangers launch an investigation into the allegations of sexual abuse at the Karolyi Ranch.

Multiple athletes have come forward with allegations of abuse by former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar while they were training at the famed facility, located in East Texas near Huntsville. Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison last week.

If you've never seen it, a Tide Pod looks like a little rounded packet, white with two separate swirls of blue and orange liquid.

To be clear, a Tide Pod is laundry detergent heavily concentrated into a single packet, meant to dissolve in water and clean a single load of laundry. But these days, it's a dare — an Internet meme, in which teenagers try to eat Tide Pods as a "challenge."

The French grocery chain that made headlines last week when its drastic price drops caused literal knock-down-drag-out fights is now the subject of an investigation, according to Le Parisien. The French daily reports the Directorate General of Consumer Affairs and Fraud Control has launched an inquiry into whether the price slashes met regulations.

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