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In a 24-hour marathon session, Greek lawmakers approved the draft of an 85 billion euro bailout reached earlier this week with international lenders — agreeing to many of the austerity measures that voters rejected in a referendum last month and sparking a rebellion in the ruling party ranks.

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"Sesame Street" has found a new home, HBO. Under a five-year deal, new episodes will get their first run on the pay cable channel. As NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reports, the deal gives "Sesame Street" a fresh lease on life.

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Curtis Carroll discovered the stock market in prison. Through friends and family on the outside, he invests from San Quentin State Prison in Northern California, and he's also an informal financial adviser to fellow inmates and correctional officers. Everyone in prison calls him Wall Street.

"I couldn't believe that this kind of access to this type of money could be accessible to anybody. Everybody should do it. And it's legal!" he says.

In the coming months, a few shoppers will encounter a new and unfamiliar phrase when looking at packages of pork: "Produced without the use of ractopamine."

It's the brainchild of David Maren, founder of Tendergrass Farms, which sells pork products from pigs raised the "all-natural" way, on pasture.

Maren first heard about ractopamine years ago, when he was just getting into this business. Maren was talking with his cousin, who raises pigs the conventional way, in big hog houses.

Baskets of perfectly seasoned deep-fried chicken sizzle during lunch hour at Dooky Chase Restaurant in New Orleans, a city famous for its food. But the real magic happens early in the morning, when Leah Chase, 92, arrives to prepare the day's specials.

"I made meatloaf today. Smothered pork chops. I did oyster and artichoke soup," says Chase.

Dooky Chase is a landmark in the city's historically African-American Treme neighborhood.

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Known for adult dramas and gory thrillers, HBO is home to some of the most colorful characters on television, but this fall another brightly colored crew is joining the network.

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit behind the beloved children's show, announced a new deal with HBO Thursday that will bring the next five seasons of Sesame Street to the premium cable channel and its streaming services.

But Sesame Street isn't vacating its old neighborhood, NPR's Neda Ulaby reports. She tells our Newscast unit that:

It had to happen. For years, the Wheaties slogan – "breakfast of champions" — has been invoked by beer lovers who pop open an adult beverage before noon. Now the cereal company is putting its name and logo on a beer.

That beer is called HefeWheaties, the result of a collaboration between two Minneapolis companies: cereal-maker General Mills and brewer Fulton Beer. As the name implies, the beer is a hefeweizen, the German style that relies on wheat for its base.

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The sun hasn't been up long in Kingfisher, Okla., but it already feels like it's burning. Trucks are moving wheat as people try to get their work done early. It looks like business as usual for a hot summer day an hour northwest of Oklahoma City.

Henry Senn, Jim Willms and Bill Stolz come to CHS Plains Partners, the local grain elevator, just about every day to share stories from the good old days and talk about wheat prices.

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To make sense of the international reaction and China's motives for what it's doing with the yuan, we turn to NPR's Frank Langfitt in Shanghai. And first, Frank, why are markets around the world reacting so negatively to this?

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The Indian government is seeking $99 million in damages from Swiss food and beverage giant Nestle over a recent food scare involving the Maggi brand of instant noodles that are a household staple in India.

The class action, filed late Tuesday before India's National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission, accuses Nestle of "gross negligence, apathy and callousness."

For the second-straight day, China has allowed its currency to take a sharp drop, sparking another round of falling stock prices internationally. The decision to devalue the yuan has shaken investors who fear a currency war and question the health of China's economy, the second-largest in the world.

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When China suddenly cut the value of its currency Tuesday, investors everywhere were caught off guard.

And they didn't like it. They sent both stock and commodity prices much lower. Even interest rates fell.

Now maybe you are wondering: Huh? What does this China move mean for me?

Before we get to that, let's first run through what happened on the other side of the world:

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Could the next big thing in alternative proteins be a something tiny and green?

The party's over for Columbia House, the music and movie subscription company that has been called "the Spotify of the '80s."

Filmed Entertainment Inc., which owns Columbia House, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Monday in a Manhattan court after more than two decades of declining revenues, according to a company statement.

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Federal authorities have charged nine people in connection with an elaborate trading scheme involving hackers from Ukraine and securities traders in the U.S. that generated more than $30 million in illegal profits.

The federal indictments, unsealed today in New York and New Jersey, allege that hackers broke into three news wire companies to get early access to more than 150,000 confidential press releases — such as merger-and-acquisition announcements. This allowed the schemers to make trades on them before the deals became public.

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