Business

Shots - Health News
1:33 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Couples Counseling Catches On With Tech Co-Founders

Work partners Jon Chintanaroad (left) and Mike Prestano are all smiles now, but founding a tech startup together threatened their friendship β€” and their business.
April Dembosky KQED

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:03 pm

Startups fail for a lot of reasons: bad product, wrong timing. But sometimes, it's just you.

Relationship problems between co-founders are among the biggest reasons companies don't make it. Increasingly in Silicon Valley, business partners are looking for help before things go downhill β€” they're signing up for couples counseling.

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The Salt
1:16 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

How Texas Ranchers Try To Clinch The Perfect Rib-Eye

Donnell Brown and another cowboy move a grouping of bulls from one pen to another on rib-eye ultrasound day in March at the R.A Brown Ranch.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:03 pm

We're heading into grilling season, which means breaking out the burgers and brats. But if you're a true meat lover, the slab you'll want to be searing is the rib-eye.

The rib-eye is the bestselling cut of beef in America both at the supermarket and the steakhouse, according to the National Cattlemen's Beef Association.

Beef lovers go crazy for it because of its marbling β€” the network of fat within muscles that melts on the grill and makes the steak juicy and tender.

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It's All Politics
12:25 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Rubio Takes Up Koch Brothers Charge On Export-Import Bank

Sen. Marco Rubio speaks at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Summit in New Hampshire earlier this month.
Getty Images

There's a growing battle in Washington, especially among Republicans, over the Export-Import Bank, an 80-year-old federal agency that helps to finance American companies in foreign trade. Congress must reauthorize the bank by June 30 or it will shut down.

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Germany's Largest Bank Fined $2.5 Billion In Rate-Fixing Scandal

The headquarters of Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt. Germany's largest bank has been hit with a $2.5 billion fine for manipulating a key interest rate. Seven other banks in various countries have also been fined in the far-reaching scandal.
Michael Probst AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 1:35 pm

Deutsche Bank, Germany's largest bank, has been fined $2.5 billion by U.S. and U.K. regulators for trying to manipulate the so-called LIBOR rate, a benchmark for interbank loans, which in turn is used to set interest rates on everything from credit card debt to mortgages.

The German bank is one of eight financial institutions, including Swiss-based UBS and the Royal Bank of Scotland, that were caught up in the scandal, which involved dozens of traders and managers and spanned a four-year period from 2005-2009.

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Planet Money
5:03 am
Thu April 23, 2015

How A Swiss Cheese Cartel Made Fondue Popular

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
4:30 am
Thu April 23, 2015

CDC: Blue Bell Listeria Outbreak Started In 2010

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:08 am
Thu April 23, 2015

More Whistleblowers Say Health Plans Are Gouging Medicare

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:29 am

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years.

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Around the Nation
2:25 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why

Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:25 pm

A magnitude-3.0 earthquake is small, but most people can feel it. Historically, Oklahoma got less than two of those a year, but in 2013 it became two a week.

It's only gotten more active since then β€” last year, the state had three times as many earthquakes as in the entire seismically active state of California.

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The Salt
2:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Fruit Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage

A cherry tree and its blossoms are covered with snow in an orchard near Traverse City, Mich. Three years ago, almost every fruit crop in Michigan was frozen out when cold temperatures followed some 80 degree days in March.
John L. Russell AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:41 am

Fruit growers in northern Michigan grow apples, peaches and wine grapes. But the big crop here is tart cherries.

More than half of Ken Engle's 140-acre farm is planted with what he calls sour cherries.

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U.S.
2:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Some Companies Fight Pay Gap By Eliminating Salary Negotiations

Women stage a protest demanding equal pay for women at a 2012 rally in Miami.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 8:56 am

When it comes to negotiating salaries, the research is pretty clear: women are less assertive than men. It's one reason women who start their careers with a narrower pay gap see it widen over time.

Carnegie Mellon economics professor Linda Babcock, who studies the gender pay gap, says men are four times more likely to negotiate their pay. That keeps women at a disadvantage, though they're not always aware of it.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

New Orleans Bans Smoking In Bars, Restaurants

A sign outside The Red Door lounge last weekend warned about the impending smoking ban in New Orleans.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 4:55 pm

You can take your drinks outside on Bourbon Street, but you can no longer bring your smokes indoors.

Effective Wednesday, New Orleans has banned smoking in bars, restaurants and casinos.

The New York Times published an intriguing look at the city's nightlife spots as the ban went into effect.

Here's an excerpt:

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Law
2:37 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Closing Arguments Begin In AIG Bailout Case

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 5:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Business
2:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Comcast, Time Warner Push For Merger Approval Amid Opposition

Federal regulators are considering whether to approve the proposed $45 billion merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 6:17 am

Officials of Comcast and Time Warner Cable met Wednesday with federal regulators to discuss the companies' proposed $45 billion merger. The deal would create a single company that would control large parts of the cable TV and broadband Internet markets.

A published report said recently that Justice Department staff members have decided to oppose the deal on antitrust grounds. But company officials are using a lot of firepower to get the deal approved.

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Performing Arts
2:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Actors' Equity Implements $9 Minimum Wage For LA's Small Theaters

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 5:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Google Announces Foray Into The Wireless Business

Google announced on Wednesday that it is venturing into the wireless business by offering a service called "Project Fi."

Essentially, Google is using the Sprint and T-Mobile networks to provide wireless access to users of Google Nexus 6 phones.

That means that service will be limited, but the real news here is that Google is offering the service with a novel pricing scheme in which customers only pay for the data that they use.

Here's how Google explains it in a blog post:

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Bail For Alleged Flash Crash Trader Set At More Than $7M

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 1:33 am

A British man who U.S. prosecutors say contributed to the 2010 flash crash on Wall Street has told a London court that he opposes extradition to the U.S.

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NPR Ed
10:03 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Could It Be? Researchers Find A Hiring Bias That Favors Women

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 1:14 pm

Think, for just a moment, about the last job you applied for.

If you didn't get the job (apologies), did you get an interview? If not, did you feel some hidden forces, beyond your control, working against you?

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Goats and Soda
6:49 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Why Somali Grandmas And Aid Workers Might Be Short On Cash

A Somali woman counts the cash she collected from a money transfer service in Mogadishu, the capital city.
Farah Abdi Warsameh AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 1:48 pm

A Somali who's living and working abroad wants to send money to his grandmother in a remote village. A money transfer company gets the cash delivered in a flash.

An aid organization wants to pay its Somali staff. Again, money transfer companies do the job in a country where the banking system shut down in 1991, when the government collapsed.

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Shots - Health News
5:56 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Is It Time To Make Medical And Family Leave Paid?

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:54 am

It's been more than 20 years since passage of the landmark Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows workers to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off for medical or family reasons without losing their jobs.

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Politics
3:14 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Renewed Trade Debate Puts Presidential Candidates On The Spot

In New Hampshire on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton weighed in on the trade deal without taking sides. "Well, any trade deal has to produce jobs and raise wages and increase prosperity and protect our security," she said.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 12:51 pm

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Business
3:10 am
Wed April 22, 2015

20 Years Ago, Match.Com Revolutionized How To Find A Date

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Whether you get dumped in person or over the Internet, another potential soulmate is only a click away. It so happens that the first online dating site is celebrating a big anniversary.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Back At Base
1:52 am
Wed April 22, 2015

National Guard Members Struggle To Keep Civilian Careers

Rida Sihab Mansour, a staff sergeant in the National Guard, stands with the uniform he wears when he serves on the honor guard at military funerals. He says he's positive that his guard commitments are making it more difficult to build a career.
Katie Schoolov KPBS

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 6:18 pm

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Parallels
1:50 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Merchant Ships Called On To Aid Migrants In Mediterranean Feel The Strain

The King Jacob, a Portuguese-flagged cargo vessel, was the first ship to arrive near the migrant boat that sank off the Libyan coast over the weekend. The boat had been carrying more than 800 people.
Alessandro Fucarini AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 12:22 pm

Italian prosecutors say the ship carrying hundreds of migrants that sank over the weekend most likely crashed against a cargo ship that had come to its rescue.

Merchant ships are often called on to help rescue migrants on vessels attempting to cross the Mediterranean. So when a distress call went out late Saturday evening from the overloaded migrant vessel, commercial vessels in the region responded.

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The Salt
4:33 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

At Last: Kentucky Authorities Bust Ring Behind Great Bourbon Heist

Pappy Van Winkle bourbons at Bourbons Bistro in Louisville, Ky. The spirit was pricey even before a heist at the distillery.
Noah Adams/for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 1:08 pm

Finally, the great Kentucky bourbon mystery has been solved.

Back in 2013, more than 200 bottles of aging Pappy Van Winkle bourbon vanished from a locked, secure area of the Buffalo Trace distillery in Frankfort, Ky. Even before the heist, the bottles were rare β€” some fetched as much as $1,000 in private sales.

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All Tech Considered
3:22 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Google's New Search Algorithm Stokes Fears Of 'Mobilegeddon'

The Google logo is seen at the Google headquarters in Brussels. This week, Google is changing the way its influential search engine recommends websites on smartphones and tablets in a shift that's expected to sway where millions of people shop, eat and find information.
Virginia Mayo AP

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 3:37 pm

Google has a lot of algorithms. And the company updates them on a regular basis. But one update that started rolling out Tuesday has tech writers across the Internet warning of a coming "Mobilegeddon."

The change is only taking place on Google searches made on smartphones. The results will favor websites deemed "mobile friendly," giving them higher rankings than sites that are only optimized for desktops and laptops.

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The Salt
3:16 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Millions Of Chickens To Be Killed As Bird Flu Outbreak Puzzles Industry

Chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa, in 2009. This week, bird flu hit a large poultry facility in Iowa. It's not clear how the virus is evading the industry's biosecurity efforts.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 11:08 am

Bird flu has been striking chicken and turkey farms in parts of the West and Midwest. This past week, it hit a flock of millions egg-laying chickens in northeastern Iowa. Update 4/22/2015: The USDA now says that around 3 million birds were affected in the Iowa facility β€” down from a previous estimate of 5 million.

Our original post continues below.

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Politics
3:16 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Business, Labor Debate Pacific Trade Deal Before Senate

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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It's All Politics
1:54 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Should The Government Get Out Of The Air Traffic Control Business?

An air traffic control tower at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 4:25 pm

Keeping track of the traffic in the skies above us is a big job. The nation's air traffic control system has been reliable, but it's not very efficient. And efforts to replace it with newer technology have gotten bogged down by a combination of uncertain congressional funding and the slow-moving federal bureaucracy. Now, some in Congress want to get the government out of the air traffic control business.

The Federal Aviation Administration says some 7,000 aircraft are over the U.S. at any given time.

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Planet Money
1:03 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Who Owns Fannie Mae And Freddie Mac?

We recently did a story that began with this sentence:

"The housing market has recovered in many parts of the country, but the government still owns the mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac."

After the story aired, we got a bunch of messages from a listener, Andrew Tomlinson, demanding a correction. So we called him up.

Andrew argues that the government does not actually own Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

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Shots - Health News
12:31 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Young Adults With Autism More Likely To Be Unemployed, Isolated

Credit: NPR; Source: National Longitudinal Transition Study-2/A.J. Drexel Autism Institute

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:12 am

The transition to adulthood marks a big turning point in life for everyone, but for young people on the autism spectrum that transition can be really tough.

Young adults with autism had lower employment rates and higher rates of complete social isolation than people with other disabilities, according to a report published Tuesday by the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute.

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