Business

Business
3:31 am
Tue June 2, 2015

Are You Willing To Share Your Wearables Data With Your Boss?

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 10:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
3:26 am
Tue June 2, 2015

Companies Fight Back Against Protesters With Financial Pressure

Originally published on Tue June 2, 2015 9:31 am

For protestors and activists unhappy with a particular company or industry, driving up the cost of doing business is a tried and true way to apply pressure. Think about the grape boycott in the late '60s for farmworkers rights. Or more recently, protests over worker wages at fast food restaurants.

But now some corporations are fighting back by putting financial pressure on activists.

Duncan Tarr is a 20-year-old junior at Michigan State University. He is also an activist.

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Law
3:18 am
Tue June 2, 2015

Religious Groups, Businesses Review Supreme Court's Headscarf Ruling

Originally published on Tue June 2, 2015 6:05 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
3:08 am
Tue June 2, 2015

Many NFL Players Make Abysmal Financial Decisions, Research Shows

Originally published on Tue June 2, 2015 6:05 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
1:38 am
Tue June 2, 2015

Texas Puts Brakes On Telemedicine — And Teladoc Cries Foul

Diagnosis by text or a phone call is often convenient and popular with patients. But is it good medicine?
Apriori iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 12:06 pm

On a recent trip to Chicago, Patti Broyles felt like she was looking at the world from the bottom of a fish bowl.

"This weather was really cold and rainy and I had a lot of pressure in my sinus areas," Broyles says.

Since she was nowhere near her primary care doctor in Dallas, she called Teladoc, the largest telemedicine provider in the U.S., for advice. Patients whose employers or insurers have deals with the Dallas-based company can call any time and be connected with a physician on duty within minutes.

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The Salt
1:35 am
Tue June 2, 2015

Mush No More: Retirement Home Food Gets Fresh And Local

Chef Eric David Corradetti presents dinner to residents at the Bethlehem Woods senior living facility in La Grange Park, Ill. His kitchen emphasizes fresh produce and meats and meals made from scratch.
Courtesy of Unidine

Originally published on Tue June 2, 2015 6:05 am

Want to eat food that's fresh, local and cooked from scratch? Consider a retirement home. Once known for bland, institutional fare, hundreds of retirement communities around the nation now tout their restaurant-like dining experiences.

One of those is Bethlehem Woods in La Grange Park, Ill. Resident Marge Healy counts on having dinner with the same group of friends every evening.

"We're almost like a family," she says, as her friends nod in agreement.

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It's All Politics
8:48 pm
Mon June 1, 2015

Justices: Retailer Can't Refuse To Hire Someone Because She Wears Hijab

Samantha Elauf outside the Supreme Court after the court in February 2015.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 2, 2015 11:31 am

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that Abercrombie & Fitch violated the nation's laws against religious discrimination when it refused to hire a Muslim teenager because she wore a headscarf.

Samantha Elauf, 17, applied for a job selling clothes at the Abercrombie Kids store in Tulsa. She long had worn a hijab — a headscarf — for religious reasons, and she wore the black scarf when she was interviewed by the store's assistant manager.

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The Salt
4:27 pm
Mon June 1, 2015

It's Raining Nitrogen In A Colorado Park. Farmers Can Help Make It Stop

Jim Cheatham, a biologist with the National Park Service, studies the ways nitrogen in the air has been disrupting the ecological balance of Rocky Mountain National Park.
Stephanie Paige Ogburn/KUNC

Originally published on Mon June 1, 2015 10:29 pm

It's May in Rocky Mountain National Park, but on a mountainside 10,829 feet above sea level, snow is falling. It's pelting Jim Cheatham, a biologist with the National Park Service. Shrugging off the cold, Cheatham seizes a teachable moment. This snow, he says, holds more than just water.

"Chances are it's carrying the excess nitrogen we're talking about," says Cheatham.

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The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Mon June 1, 2015

Intel Makes Biggest Bet In Its History

The Intel logo is displayed on the exterior of Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 3:10 pm

The chipmaker Intel is buying a company that makes ... chips. Altera will cost about $16.7 billion in cash.

It would be the largest acquisition in Intel's 47-year history, and it's part of an effort to secure business. While Intel is an undisputed leader in chips for personal computers, its got competition in the mobile, wireless age.

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The Record
11:28 am
Mon June 1, 2015

How Streaming Is Changing Music

Photo illustration Photos via Library of Congress and Flickr Commons

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 1:47 pm

There was a moment in the mid-2000s when it seemed like we might be collecting songs, one-by-one, into eternity. Internet connections were getting faster, hard drives stored more data in tinier spaces, songs were easier than ever to find and available for little or no money. Every year, the new version of Apple's iPod, first introduced in 2001 with a now-adorable 5GB of storage space, held thousands upon thousands more songs.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Mon June 1, 2015

Supreme Court Rules For Woman Denied Abercrombie & Fitch Job Over Headscarf

Samantha Elauf (right) stands with her mother, Majda, in February outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon June 1, 2015 2:53 pm

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court has ruled 8-1 in favor of a young Muslim woman who was denied a job at Abercrombie & Fitch because she wore a headscarf.

Samantha Elauf had applied for the sales job in Tulsa, Okla., in 2008 and was recommended for hire by an interviewer. But Abercrombie has a "look policy" that bars the wearing of caps by its salespeople.

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Mon June 1, 2015

Climate Change Meeting To Focus On Ensuring Countries Keep Commitments

Originally published on Mon June 1, 2015 2:22 pm

The world's governments are meeting today in Bonn, Germany, to work on a U.N. agreement to tackle climate change, a day after European energy companies urged them to adopt a pricing system for carbon emissions.

NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce, who is reporting on the story for our Newscast unit, says the meeting in Bonn is part of the run-up to a major climate summit being held in Paris at the end of the year. Here's more from Nell:

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The Two-Way
5:48 am
Mon June 1, 2015

Murder Charges In Bangladesh Over 2013 Garment Factory Collapse

The relative of a worker who died in the 2013 Rana Plaza collapse mourns April 24 in front of a monument erected in memory of the victims. Authorities on Monday charged more than 40 people with murder in connection with the building's collapse that killed 1,137 people.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Mon June 1, 2015 1:48 pm

Authorities in Bangladesh have charged more than 40 people with murder in connection with the 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex — the country's worst industrial accident. More than 1,100 people died and 2,500 others were injured. Among those charged is Sohel Rana, the man who owned the complex.

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Around the Nation
3:15 am
Mon June 1, 2015

Oregon To Test Switching To Mileage-Based Gas Tax

Originally published on Mon June 1, 2015 4:37 pm

Copyright 2015 NWNews. To see more, visit http://www.nwnewsnetwork.org/.

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Around the Nation
7:22 am
Sun May 31, 2015

Secretary Of Agriculture: Bird Flu Poses 'No Health Issue' To Humans

A gate blocks the entrance of a farm operated by Daybreak Foods, on May 17, 2015 near Eagle Grove, Iowa. The facility was reportedly struck by the current outbreak of bird flu. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsick says biosecurity measures are crucial to containing the spread of the disease, which has only infected birds, not humans.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 31, 2015 10:12 am

Bird flu is raging through poultry farms across the United States. It's the largest outbreak in U.S. history, affecting 20 states and tens of millions of birds. The disease is particularly ravaging farms in the Midwest.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that the H5 bird flu, the variety causing the outbreak, has not been detected in humans and currently poses a low threat to the public.

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Shots - Health News
3:52 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

When Are Employee Wellness Incentives No Longer Voluntary?

There are legal questions about how far employers can go to encourage participation in wellness programs.
Bjorn Rune Lie Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 4:49 pm

Scotts Miracle-Gro makes products for the care and health of lawns. The Marysville, Ohio, company says it wants to nurture its 8,000 employees the same way.

"It's very much of a family culture here," says Jim King, a spokesman for the Scotts company, which offers discounted prescriptions, annual health screenings and some free medical care.

In states where it's legal, the company refuses to hire people who smoke.

"We've been screening for tobacco use for about a decade," King says. "We no longer employ tobacco users."

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All Tech Considered
3:46 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

As Police Body Cameras Increase, What About All That Video?

Taser International is now selling police departments the technology to store videos from body cameras.
Patrick T. Fallon Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 5:09 pm

You know what a pain it can be storing and organizing the millions of videos you've shot on your smartphone. Now imagine you're a police officer, and you wear a body camera every day.

Police cams have suddenly become a big business. In the months since Ferguson, share prices for the camera manufacturer Taser International have doubled. But in the long run, the real money is in selling police a way to store all that video.

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Politics
3:46 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

Several Cash Withdrawals Triggered Investigation Into Former Speaker Hastert

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 4:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For more now on the banking laws that paved the way for charges against Dennis Hastert, what got him in trouble was a pattern of cash withdrawals.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Sports
3:08 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

Sepp Blatter Reelected To 5th Term As FIFA President

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 4:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

Texas Politicians And Businesses Feud Over Medicaid Expansion

While governor of Texas, Rick Perry refused to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid.
Rick Wilking Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 10:12 pm

Dallas's Parkland Hospital treats a lot of people without health insurance. On a November day in 1963, emergency room doctors at this county hospital frantically tried to save an American president who could not be saved. These days, emergency room doctors frantically try to treat 240,000 patients every year.

"So you can see we have every treatment area filled up. Beds are in the hallways and the rooms are all full," says Dr. John Pease, chief of emergency services.

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Sports
2:46 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

Indictment Against FIFA Raises Questions About Nike's History In Brazil

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 4:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

Silk Road Founder Ross Ulbricht Sentenced To Life In Prison

This Feb. 4 courtroom sketch shows Ross Ulbricht as he was found guilty in New York. Ulbricht was sentenced to prison on Friday.
Elizabeth Williams AP

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 3:20 pm

Ross Ulbricht, the San Francisco man who created Silk Road, was sentenced Friday to life in prison for his role in operating the shadowy online marketplace.

Ulbricht faced at least 20 years in prison, but federal prosecutors had sought a "substantially" longer sentence.

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The Salt
12:56 pm
Fri May 29, 2015

America's Elite Cows Don't Give Birth — Their Surrogates Do

Dan Byers, an elite-cattle breeder, checks the heartbeat on a newborn calf, born from an embryo implanted in a surrogate heifer. Because the calf was delivered via C-section, he sprinkles sweet molasses powder on her to prompt the surrogate mother cow to lick her clean.
Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Sat May 30, 2015 12:38 pm

Panda, standing six feet tall and weighing almost a ton, is everything a show cow should be: broad-backed and round-rumped, with sturdy legs holding up her heft. Her hide — thick and black, with splotches of creamy white — fits her name.

"She's a big-time cow," says Dan Byers, owner of Byers Premium Cattle, Inc. "She's a freak of nature is what she is."

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Fri May 29, 2015

First-Quarter Revision Puts GDP In The Red

Waiter Melvin Angel shovels snow outside the restaurant he works at in Boston in April. The harsh winter in the Northeast took an even bigger toll on economic growth in the first three months of 2015 than previously estimated.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 4:42 pm

It turns out that the harsh winter and a growing trade deficit made a bigger dent in the U.S. economy in the first three months of the year than previously thought — with revised first-quarter GDP actually shrinking by 0.7 percent, according to the Commerce Department.

Commerce had earlier estimated output growing by 0.2 percent. The contraction announced Friday is the first since the first quarter of 2014.

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Planet Money
3:20 am
Fri May 29, 2015

Computer Tablets Take Over Part Of Restaurant Server's Job

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 6:07 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Salt
3:45 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Something's Spawning On Appalachia's Forest Farms

The Maslowskis love to cook, and with each mushroom harvest, they invent new recipes. One of their favorite dishes is Hungarian mushroom soup.
Courtesy of Susan Maslowski

Many farmers in Appalachia are cultivating food not in big open fields but deep in the forest — where ramps, hazelnuts and maple trees for syrup thrive.

But some would like to see the region producing even more forest-grown products — in particular, mushrooms — to meet growing demand at specialty food stores and restaurants that serve local ingredients.

The catch? Cultivating mushrooms is labor-intensive, and if you want to sell them to the public, you'll need to show proof that they're edible and safe.

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Business
3:25 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

What Are $26 Million In American Express Rewards Points Worth?

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Technology
3:25 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

FCC Proposes Expansion Of Lifeline Program To Include Internet

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:01 pm

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Sports
3:25 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

FIFA Delegate: Indictment 'Brought A Cloud' On Upcoming Presidential Vote

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
3:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Blind Auditions Could Give Employers A Better Hiring Sense

In the face-to-face interview process, research shows that managers tend to hire applicants who are similar to them on paper.
Bjorn Rune Lie Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:01 pm

Entrepreneur Petar Vujosevic was just a regular guy who saw a big problem with the way the hiring system works.

Typically, a hiring manager posts an opening, describes the ideal candidate and resumes come flooding in. After doing some interviews, the manager has to make a gut decision: Who is the best person for the job?

Research shows that more often than not, managers pick someone whose background is similar to theirs.

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