Fronteras: A Changing America

NPR Story
12:49 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

A Profile Of Who Is Crossing The Border Illegally

As comprehensive immigration reform makes it’s way to the legislative floors, the lynchpin of the debate continues to hinge on border security. In the last decade the number of Border Patrol officers has more than doubled, and there are now more than 653 miles of steel barriers along the border.

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NPR Story
7:05 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Best Of The Border (5/27-5/31)

Retiring In Costa Rica: The Dream And The Reality

The Dungans came to Costa Rica with a shipping container full of possessions and with hearts full of hope for a good life of retirement.

They left with just whatever they could fit into four suitcases, losing nearly $100,000 in the process.

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NPR Story
4:53 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Tijuana Leaps Into Digital Broadcast, Leaving Some Behind

On Tuesday, Tijuana became the first city in Latin America to completely transition from analog to digital broadcasting. The border city is the beginning of a national conversion, which would see Mexico go completely digital by Dec. 31, 2015.

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NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Judge Finds Legal Errors In ICE Training

PHOENIX — When a federal judge found last week that sheriff's deputies in Arizona singled out Latinos, he also ruled that a federal training program of those deputies included a legal error.

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NPR Story
11:32 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

Homicide Possible For Five Bodies In Arizona Desert

TUCSON, Ariz. — The bodies of five people were found Tuesday morning in the southern Arizona desert and are now being investigated as possible homicides.

Pima County Medical Examiner Greg Hess said the discoveries were suspicious. U.S. Border Patrol agents working on the Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation found the bodies and reported them to tribal police. The FBI is also investigating the scene. Tohono O’odham police refused to comment on the investigation.

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NPR Story
1:07 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

How Do You Build A Tourism Co-Op In Boquillas, Mexico?

In April, we reported on a formal border crossing re-opening in West Texas. For years, thousands of tourists flocked to the tiny village of Boquillas Mexico, propping up their local economy.

Then, Sept. 11, 2001 happened. The border was unmanned, and in the name of national security it was sealed. The closed border was a crippling blow to Boquillas' economy.

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NPR Story
11:49 am
Thu May 30, 2013

California Legislature Pushing Bills to Protect Immigrant Rights

California has the highest number of immigrants without documentation: 2.6 million immigrants or 7 percent of the total state population. Another statistic, one in six Californian children have a parent who’s living in the U.S. illegally.

With such a large population, California has lot to gain when it comes passing comprehensive immigration reform.

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NPR Story
11:49 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Texas Back To Rehash Redistricting, Latino Voting Rights

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — With Republicans on one side and civil rights groups on the other, Texas is arguing redistricting again in Federal Court. The results could shake up the state’s 36 congressional seats.

It’s a new election cycle but it’s the same old challenge — is Republican-controlled Texas drawing an election map that underrepresents minority voters?

Michael Li is an election attorney who runs the non-partisan blog txredistricting.org.

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NPR Story
7:01 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Retiring In Costa Rica: The Dream And The Reality

Fronteras Desk

PLAYA HERMOSA, Guanacaste, Costa Rica — There is scarcely a breeze on the beach in Playa Hermosa, along the central Pacific coast. Dan Brovont is surveying the sunset. He has been in Costa Rica for just five hours, having flown in from Albuquerque.

His first impression: “Heat. Heat and humidity. Of course I’m way out of shape. I’m sure if I dropped a few pounds, I could weather the heat a little bit better.”

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NPR Story
7:01 am
Thu May 30, 2013

'Star Wars' Being Dubbed Into Navajo Language

Fronteras Desk

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope” will premier this summer, dubbed into Navajo. It’s the first time a major motion picture has been translated into a Native American language. The project may provide an important tool for Navajo families wishing to learn and preserve the language.

When Dave Nezzie met his future wife Amanda, there were some clear differences.

“When I first moved from the south to Arizona, I thought roadrunners were six feet tall and blue, and that natives ran around with headdresses and no shirts,” Amanda Nezzie said.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

Immigration Proposal Shortens Wait For Filipino World War II Veterans' Children

Fronteras Desk

When he was still in his teens, John Aspiras, Jr. fought in a guerilla unit backing U.S. forces against the invading Japanese army in World War II. After the war, he joined a Filipino army unit that assisted the U.S. military with cleanup operations.

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NPR Story
11:48 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Colorado River Stakeholders Call For Action

Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — As Lakes Mead and Powell reach record low capacities, and demand exceeds supply, water agency officials are calling for action.

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NPR Story
11:39 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Arizona Mom Held On Narco Charges In Mexico

Fronteras Desk

NOGALES, Mexico — A hearing opened Tuesday in a Mexican court in Nogales in the case of an Arizona woman accused of smuggling 13 pounds of marijuana through a Mexican Army checkpoint.

Gary Maldonado maintains his wife Yanira, mother of seven, is innocent. He says they were traveling up from visiting family in Sinaloa on a bus when the Mexican Army stopped the bus to search it. The Army said the marijuana was found under Yanira Maldonado's seat.

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NPR Story
11:35 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Why Immigration Reform May Die in the House

USA Today reports that Republican Congressional districts are less diverse than ever following the 2012 redistricting. What that means is that, while Republican leaders across the country have been clamoring for the party to embrace Latino voters and endorse comprehensive immigration reform, there's actually little incentive for many GOP members of the House to do so.

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NPR Story
11:35 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Arizona Mom Accused Of Narco Charges In Mexico

Fronteras Desk

NOGALES, Mexico — A hearing opened Tuesday in a Mexican court in Nogales in the case of an Arizona woman accused of smuggling 13 pounds of marijuana through a Mexican Army checkpoint.

Gary Maldonado maintains his wife Yanira is innocent. He says they were traveling up from visiting family in Sinaloa on a bus when the Mexican Army stopped the bus to search it. The Army said the marijuana was found under Yanira Maldonado's seat.

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NPR Story
7:02 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Phoenix Man Faces Challenge Of Retiring Abroad

Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 9:57 am

PLAYA HERRADURA, Costa Rica — As many as 50,000 Americans live in Costa Rica and many of them are Baby Boomers flocking to the country’s tropical beaches to retire, according to the U.S. State Department.

They’re drawn to Costa Rica's biodiversity, the political stability, and its cheap healthcare. For one Phoenix man, who is about to embark on the journey, Costa Rica is all about adventure.

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NPR Story
4:10 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Study: Revitalize Tijuana Tourist District For Locals

As drug war escalated and financial recession continued, American tourism halted in Tijuana. But in that absence, locals began redefining the city for themselves.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Texas Has A $2 Billion Water Plan

With Governor Rick Perry’s signature, Texas faces one more hurdle before drawing $2 billion from its Rainy Day Fund to improve water infrastructure for the drought stricken state, a public vote.

After a finalized budget arises from the Texas House and Senate, voters will decide in November whether or not to amend the constitution, which would create two new water accounts.

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NPR Story
12:11 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Expensive "X" Marks The Spot In Juarez

Fronteras Desk

CIUDAD JUÁREZ, Mexico — The latest art installation in the Mexican border city of Juárez is a nearly 20-story tall sculpture in the shape of a giant "X". Despite its controversial construction costs, the inauguration for the new monument was well attended.

On Friday 120,000 border residents flooded the plaza surrounding the colossal "X" which is now a permanent addition to the skyline shared by El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez. Mayor Hector Murguia stood at the sculpture's base and delivered a dedication speech.

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NPR Story
11:49 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Increase In CBP Officers Could Reduce Border Wait Times

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — U.S. Customs and Border Protection could be getting a much-needed influx of officers as the House Appropriations Committee approves the Homeland Security Budget.

An additional 1,600 Customs and Border Protection officers could start assisting with border check points to speed up entry into the U.S. if the Homeland Security Appropriations bill for 2014 passes.

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NPR Story
11:24 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Hopi Tribe To Sue Wachovia For Fraud

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The Hopi Tribe of northeastern Arizona has filed a lawsuit against Wachovia bank, alleging that the tribe was taken advantage of by their financial advisers. The lawsuit seeks nearly $190 million in damages for investment fraud.

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NPR Story
9:07 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Top Water Officials Meet In San Diego Over Drought-Stricken Colorado River

KPBS

As the Colorado River drought continues to worsen, federal officials are meeting in San Diego Tuesday to address water conservation among the 40 top water officials in the seven western states that rely on the waterway for survival.

The meeting comes after dire warnings were made by the U.S. Interior Secretary in December that demand for water from the Colorado River exceeds the dwindling supply.

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NPR Story
7:00 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Best Of The Border (5/19-5/25)

Two Border Villages Reunite For One Day

For one moment, real world geopolitics were forgotten. Paso Lajitas, Mexico and Lajitas, Texas were united. With good wishes from law enforcement in both countries, the Rio Grande was crowded after separation of 11 years.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Highlights From The State Of The Border Report

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 11:20 am

The United States-Mexico border needs more customs officers, not more Border Patrol agents, according to a team of U.S. and Mexican researchers.

“At this point in time we’re at or past the point of diminishing returns in terms of Border Patrol staffing,” said Erik Lee, Associate Director of Arizona State University’s North American Center for Transborder Studies.

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NPR Story
7:12 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Money Even Tighter As Indian Country Schools Face Sequestration

Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Schools in Indian Country are starting to feel the effects of across-the-board federal budget cuts known as sequestration. For the Navajo Nation that means larger class sizes, putting off building repairs and fewer buses — which is a big deal in a place where children travel up to 70 miles to get to school.

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NPR Story
7:12 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Report: Immigration Prosecutions On Dramatic Rise

In 2012, more than 80,000 immigrants were convicted of illegal entry and reentry into the United States, according to a new report by Human Rights Watch.

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NPR Story
7:28 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Million Dollar Makeover? Behind Baja's New Image

Fronteras Desk

SAN DIEGO — In a hushed beige room at San Diego's Hotel Handlery, clusters of well-dressed American public relations executives mingled. The February luncheon — formally titled "How PR Shaped Baja California's Resurgence" — was an insider's look the inner workings of a highly regarded campaign.

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NPR Story
4:27 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Rep. Barber Contests Border Patrol Overtime Cuts

TUCSON, Ariz. — U.S. Border Patrol agents are safe from sequestration budget cuts, but will face reductions to overtime pay under a budget plan introduced by the Department of Homeland Security.

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NPR Story
3:51 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Foreign Retirees Could Benefit From Immigration Bill

Fronteras Desk

PHOENIX — Let's call it the snowbird provision.

Buried in more than 800 pages of the immigration reform legislation currently under debate is a proposal that would allow Canadians to visit second homes in the U.S. for up to eight months at a time.

It’s one of two proposals in the bill aimed at boosting foreign retirements here.

Canadian snowbirds and real estate investors have already made their mark in Phoenix.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Census: Immigration Will Be Main Driver Of U.S. Population Growth

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 11:42 am

New data from the Census Bureau projects that immigration will be the main driver of United States population growth sometime between 2027 and 2038, surpassing births on U.S. soil.

Exactly when that will happen is hard to pin down, because so much depends on immigration policy and global economics.

But assuming it does happen, it’ll be the first time since at least 1850, when the Census started collecting information about where U.S. residents were born.

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