Fronteras: A Changing America

NPR Story
1:39 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Former Arizona Prosecutor Leaked Gunwalking To Media

TUCSON, Ariz. — The former federal prosecutor for Arizona who resigned after a gunwalking scandal known as Operation Fast and Furious may now face ethical violations.

The Office of Inspector General for the Department of Justice said former U.S. Attorney Dennis Burke leaked a memo to Fox News in 2011. The OIG said it believes Burke was trying to discredit a key whistleblower to the gunwalking operation.

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NPR Story
12:40 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

More Immigration Officers Oppose Senate Reform Bill

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 2:10 pm

The union representing officers who oversee legal immigration to the U.S. says the Senate's immigration reform bill would make our current immigration system worse, not better.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Tijuana Beauty Pageant Offers Prisoners Hope

SAN DIEGO — On Friday, a beauty pageant unfolded under bright lights in Tijuana. Among the high heels and sparkly dresses were barbed wire and armed guards.

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NPR Story
12:07 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Forecast: Immigration Reform Will Fail In The House

Fronteras Desk

SAN DIEGO — In 2012, statistician Nate Silver made headlines when he accurately predicted the outcomes for the presidential election in all 50 states.

While political scientists have been forecasting election results for decades, very few forecast legislation. But in San Diego, one assistant professor is doing just that. He’s forecasting the outcome for immigration reform.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Two Border Villages Reunite For One Day

Fronteras Desk

IN THE MIDDLE OF THE RIO GRANDE — In the rural border areas of Texas, seven so-called ‘informal crossings’ were shut down following Sept. 11. These were border villages and rural economies that thrived on their interdependence. The actual border was invisible. But the shutdown destroyed that connection. Recently, two border villages were reunited briefly for a single day celebration.

For one glorious moment, real world geopolitics was forgotten. Paso Lajitas, Mexico and Lajitas, Texas were again united — not cut off from one another as they’ve been in a post-Sept. 11 world.

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NPR Story
12:29 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

San Diego-Tijuana To Have Binational Youth Orchestra

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 2:02 pm

SAN DIEGO — San Diego will soon have a youth orchestra linking musicians from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Select musicians from the Centro de Artes Musicales in Tijuana and the San Diego Young Artists Symphony (soon to be the Mainly Mozart Youth Orchestra) are coming together to form a binational orchestra.

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NPR Story
7:02 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Latinos Hardest Hit By Community College Class Shortages

Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:47 am

Limited community college capacity could keep 2.5 million Californians out of the system over the next 10 years. The seat shortage is expected to fall hardest on Latino students, squeezing 840,000 out of the schools.

Since 2007, San Diego Community Colleges have cut more than 2,600 class sections, Grossmont-Cuyamaca Colleges lost 1,600 classes and Palomar College halved its summer offerings.

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NPR Story
7:00 am
Sat May 18, 2013

Best Of The Border (5/12-5/19)

KPBS

Mexico Now A Latin American Leader In Tech Services

In the last decade Mexico’s tech industry has flourished, growing three times faster than the global average. Most of that growth is fueled by demand from the United States.

But without certain reforms Mexico’s progress can only go so far.

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NPR Story
10:49 am
Fri May 17, 2013

DACA License Ban Stands For Now In Arizona

PHOENIX — An Arizona policy that prevents certain young immigrants from getting state driver's licenses will stay in effect for now. In a Thursday ruling, a federal judge declined to temporarily block the policy, but also suggested one of the legal arguments challenging it is likely to succeed.

The plaintiffs in the suit are young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as children, and qualified for an Obama administration program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Under the program, these immigrants were granted work permits.

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NPR Story
7:02 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Visiting Where Others Cannot

Fronteras Desk

PHOENIX — As reporters, it's not unusual to find ourselves in places where other members of the public usually aren't: waiting at the scene of a crime to talk to police, inside a press conference with a high-ranking official, or taking notes in a courtroom during a trial.

Earlier this month, I had the strange feeling of being some place fairly ordinary, yet not accessible to the person who very much wanted to be in my place.

I was at a simple restaurant in Mexico City. It was run by a 73-year-old Mexican woman named Benigna Mota.

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NPR Story
7:02 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Dairy Farmers, Workers Help Each Other Survive

Fronteras Desk

COCHRANE, Wis. — John Rosenow is a fifth-generation dairy farmer, but times have changed since his Norwegian ancestors began farming in Cochrane, Wis. And Rosenow has changed with the times. Much of his workforce is now from Mexico, and Rosenow travels regularly to their village in southern Mexico to meet their families.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

McCain, Levin Say ICE Released 32 Felons Ahead Of Budget Cuts

PHOENIX — In February, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement released more than 2,000 immigrants from detention facilities in anticipation of automatic federal budget cuts.

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NPR Story
8:04 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Teen Cooking Show Teaches Culture, Cameras And Chopping Skills

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 12:37 pm

SAN DIEGO — “So directors, in order to get something going, you say ‘quiet on the set,’” Kristine Diekman shouts across the room to the two high school girls poring over a script. Diekman is a professor of video and new media at Cal State San Marcos.

Mics and cameras are in place; mixing bowls and perfectly-measured ingredients neatly laid out. This group is ready to film a high school cooking show.

“Sweet potato pie, scene six take one,” says Jesse Avilez, a ninth grader at Crawford High School, clapping his slate and then walking off the set.

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NPR Story
7:00 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Mescalero Apache Explore Rare Earth Element Mining

Fronteras Desk

The Mescalero Apache tribe of New Mexico says it is looking to expand it's economy by mining rare earth elements. The elements are highly sought after for their applications in high-tech and green industries.

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NPR Story
7:00 am
Thu May 16, 2013

West Nile Virus Cases Up Across Southwest

Fronteras Desk

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — West Nile virus cases in the Southwest are up from previous years, according to new 2012 statistics released by the Centers for Disease Control.

First discovered in New York around 1999, the West Nile virus traveled west, carried by birds and mosquitoes, eventually hitting the Southwest.

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NPR Story
7:00 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Tejano Matriarch Immortalized by U.S. Postal Service

Fronteras Desk

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — Lydia Mendoza has been called the first lady of Tejano and Conjunto Music. On Wednesday the U.S. Postal Service unveiled a Forever Stamp in her honor as part of a music icons series.

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NPR Story
5:18 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange Still In Question

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — States aiming to run their own health insurance exchanges will be in need of federal grants to get those exchanges launched, and are facing a deadline. New Mexico's application is in, but there's still a question of whether or not the exchange will be run by the state, the federal government, or both.

New Mexico's federal grant request totals about $20 million, and will be used for marketing, public relations, and outreach. With much of the state's population living in rural areas, that outreach will be critical to the exchange's survival.

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NPR Story
4:42 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Hazard Crossing: Researchers Assess Health Impacts of Long Border Waits

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 10:41 am

SAN DIEGO — People who regularly cross the United States-Mexico border know waiting for hours on foot can be hot, uncomfortable, even exhausting.

Penelope Quintana, a researcher at San Diego State University, says it's made worse by "not being able to sit down, not having restrooms, not having water available."

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Mexico Now A Latin American Leader In Tech Services

Fronteras Desk

MONTERREY, Mex. — In the last decade Mexico’s tech industry has flourished, growing three times faster than the global average. Most of that growth is fueled by demand from the United States. But without certain reforms Mexico’s progress can only go so far.

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NPR Story
3:56 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Fear Of Immigrants Is As Old As America Itself

Benjamin Franklin is generally revered as one of the most brilliant of our Founding Fathers -- the inventor of the lighting rod and bifocals, an accomplished musician, and a political theorist who helped shape the U.S. Constitution. But his thoughts on one immigrant group seem at odds with America's identity as a "nation of immigrants."

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NPR Story
10:08 am
Tue May 14, 2013

GOP Loses Former Head Of Hispanic Outreach Due To Low I.Q Dissetation

The fall out from the Heritage Foundation Senior Policy Analyst, Jason Richwine’s doctoral dissertation, "I.Q. and Immigration Policy" continues to hurt the Republican Party.

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NPR Story
4:15 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Remeasuring Border Security Effectiveness

This month, The Council on Foreign Relations, a non-partisan think tank, released a study entitled, “Managing Illegal Immigration to the United States.”

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NPR Story
3:21 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Feds Prepare For Tough Fire Season

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Federal officials told reporters Monday they are preparing for the worst this fire season. Severe drought conditions and beetle ravaged trees throughout the west combined with reduced firefighting budgets do not bode well for the coming weeks.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says the Forest Service will have 500 fewer firefighters this season. That’s five percent less manpower.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Man Convicted of Drug Smuggling Will Get New Trial

SAN DIEGO — Victor Sivilla, a Tijuana perfume salesman convicted of smuggling drugs across the border will get a new trial after the government destroyed evidence in his case.

In 2010, Border agents discovered $160,000 worth of cocaine and heroin hidden in the engine of Sivilla’s jeep.

Sivilla said he didn’t know the drugs were there, and suspected his sister-in-law’s boyfriend. He had borrowed the car shortly before Sivilla made one of his regular border crossings to buy perfume for his business.

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NPR Story
7:01 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Arizona Scientists Pinpoint Birthplace Of Plague

Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Northern Arizona University biologists have pinpointed the source of one of the deadliest plagues of all time. The discovery not only solves some ancient mysteries about the first pandemic, but could also provide answers in the event of a bioterrorism threat. Their results were just published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal PLOS Pathogens.

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NPR Story
7:05 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Best Of The Border (5/5-5/11)

Disney Want(ed) To Trademark "Dia de los Muertos"

Disney Enterprises, Inc., a subsidiary of the Walt Disney Company, filed trademark applications to secure the phrase "Dia de los Muertos" across multiple platforms for an upcoming Pixar film.

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NPR Story
4:28 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Navajo Nation Funds Water Projects

Fronteras Desk

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — With drought affecting much of the Southwest, the Navajo Nation is working to bring water to its citizens with the tribal government recently approving more than $8 million for water infrastructure projects.

The Navajo Nation is roughly the size of West Virginia, has a population of around 170,000 people, and much of the Nations citizens are in need of water.

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NPR Story
7:02 am
Fri May 10, 2013

11 Million Immigrants: What's In A Number?

KPBS

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 10:46 am

SAN DIEGO — Eleven million — that’s the estimated number of immigrants living in the United States illegally. The number has become the most-cited statistic in the immigration reform debate. But how did we even arrive at that figure? Who are these 11 million people? And is it even the best number to use?

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NPR Story
3:47 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Zuni Pueblo Housing Breaks Ground

Fronteras Desk

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — In what is thought to be the first housing program of its kind brought to a tribal community, the Pueblo of Zuni in western New Mexico has broken ground on a series of homes financed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Feds Fly Endangered Fish To Safety

Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — The Grand Canyon National Park and other federal agencies are going to great lengths to save a homely fish in the Colorado River Basin. The latest is translocation, which involves several trucks, helicopters and biologists.

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