Fronteras: A Changing America

NPR Story
7:04 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Best Of The Border (4/21-4/26)

Fronteras Desk

In Mexico, Talk Of Immigration Reform Raises Hopes For Visits Home

“I thought she was only going for three or four years at the most, and then would come back,” 82-year-old Santiago Dominguez said in Spanish.

But it’s been 18 years since Rosa Fabiana left for Phoenix. She took her two young sons and crossed into Arizona illegally.

Read more
NPR Story
7:08 am
Fri April 26, 2013

In Mexico, Talk Of Immigration Reform Raises Hopes For Visits Home

Fronteras Desk

HIDALGO, Mex. — On a recent Sunday, almost a dozen family members gather at the home of their patriarch, 82-year-old Santiago Dominguez. His home is in the town of Tepeapulco, in the Central Mexican state of Hidalgo.

A lone portrait sits on a shelf of a dark haired young woman. It is Dominguez’s daughter.

“I thought she was only going for three or four years at the most, and then would come back,” Dominguez said in Spanish.

Read more
NPR Story
3:49 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

DACA Challengers' Arguments Resonate With Judge

PHOENIX — A federal district judge in Dallas suggested in a recent order that an Obama administration initiative for young immigrants may violate the law.

Judge Reed O'Connor is weighing a legal challenge brought by Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents against their bosses to stop the program.

Read more
NPR Story
3:21 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Immigration Reform's Wild Week

Last week — amid Boston, Texas, gun control and ricin — the Gang of Eight’s immigration bill was released in the middle of the night.

Read more
NPR Story
7:03 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Bisbee Ballpark History Is In The Bricks

Fronteras Desk

PHOENIX — I got to do a little time traveling a few weekends ago.

It was my first trip to Bisbee, Ariz., a former mining company town southeast of Tucson and just 20 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border. You have to pass through Tombstone to get there.

Read more
NPR Story
3:08 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

What It Means To Have A 90-Percent Secure Border

David Martin Davies Fronteras Desk

TUCSON, Ariz. — Before the estimated 11 million people living in this country illegally can start down the long path to citizenship, the U.S.-Mexico border must reach a level of security that satisfies border hawks in Congress.

Read more
NPR Story
1:11 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

How Do Mexicans Feel About The Corona-Budweiser Merger?

TIJUANA, Mexico — The U.S. Justice Department has settled an antitrust lawsuit against Anheuser-Busch InBev. That clears the way for the world's largest brewer to buy out Grupo Modelo, the Mexican company that makes Corona beer.

Brad Rzepka is a tourist from Las Vegas. He’s sipping a Corona at a bar on Tijuana’s main tourist strip.

Read more
NPR Story
3:52 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Three Years After SB 1070, Political Climate Sees Change

Three years ago, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signed SB 1070 into law. The bill is one of the strictest state immigration enforcement laws in the country. In that time the majority of the provisions have never been enacted, with many challenged and a few overturned.

Here’s an updated list of where the bill stands after three years:

Read more
NPR Story
9:42 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Senate Immigration Bill Calls For A Drone-Patrolled Border

Fronteras Desk

Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, could soon be patrolling the United States border with Mexico 24 hours a day, seven days a week. That's what the major immigration reform bill introduced last week by a bipartisan group of senators proposes.

Read more
NPR Story
5:42 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Rate of Mexican Asylum Approval In US At All-Time High

The Miami Herald profiled a foreign national who recently received asylum. Policarpo Chavira, a bus driver and union leader, fled Juarez with his family after his son was held hostage for five days.

His story is part of a growing trend of Mexicans granted asylum at historical rates due to the drug war. That’s not to imply the numbers of Mexicans receiving asylum are high:

Read more
NPR Story
5:27 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Five Migrants Dead In Vehicle Rollover

TUCSON, Ariz. — The Department of Public Safety and the Guatemala Consulate in Phoenix are still investigating the deaths of five people who died in a crash Saturday in southeastern Arizona.

Officials say the SUV was filled with 20 Guatemalan and Mexican nationals. Five people were killed.

Read more
NPR Story
5:27 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Senate Commission Hears From High Tech Sector On Immigration

Lawmakers on the Senate Judiciary Committee heard from immigration reform proponents in the agriculture and technology industries Monday in Washington.

Industry leaders are backing a segment of the Senate written reform bill that will nearly double the annual cap on specialized workers from foreign countries.

Brad Smith is with the Microsoft Corporation. He said tech companies in the U.S. cannot fill all the jobs being created and so need to hire from outside the country.

"Unfortunately the situation is likely to get worse rather than better," he said.

Read more
NPR Story
7:02 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Quitting Coal Cuts Carbon, But Costs Customers

Photo courtesy National Park Serivce. Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Los Angeles plans to go coal free by 2025 to reduce carbon emissions. The city currently gets 40 percent of its energy from coal-fired power plants in Arizona and Utah. So while great for Earth Day, quitting coal will have ripple effects on the region, not to mention ratepayers.

Read more
NPR Story
7:03 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Medicaid Expands Choices For Native Americans In New Mexico

Fronteras Desk

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Around 25,000 Native Americans in New Mexico will become eligible for Medicaid when the Affordable Care Act goes into effect next year.

Read more
NPR Story
7:03 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Best Of The Border (4/14-4/19)

Prolific Joshua Tree Bloom Could Signal Warming Climate

Each spring, many Joshua trees send out large pineapple-shaped crowns of white-green flowers. This year, the blooms are especially large, and widespread.

Read more
NPR Story
5:04 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Border Patrol agent acquitted of abusing migrant

A federal court jury on Friday acquitted a U.S. Border Patrol agent of an allegation that he kneed and choked a migrant who was in custody.

The jury returned the verdict one day after closing arguments in the case, which included video of the confrontation.

Read more
NPR Story
1:36 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Senate Hearings Begin On Immigration Reform Proposal

Fronteras Desk

The Senate Judiciary Committee met Friday morning to review the proposed immigration reform bill.

Read more
NPR Story
7:01 am
Fri April 19, 2013

American Children In Mexico Face Educational Challenges

Fronteras Desk

TIJUANA, Mexico — At the Biblioteca Benito Juárez in Tijuana, Yara Amparo López López, coordinator of the Programa Binacional de Educación del Migrante (PROBEM) in the Mexican border state of Baja California, is presiding over a meeting.

It's her and a bunch of teenagers, speaking Spanish, English, and Spanglish.

Read more
NPR Story
7:01 am
Fri April 19, 2013

A Revolving Door For Deported Children

David Martin Davies Fronteras Desk

TIJUANA, Mexico — Adaulban, a lanky 17-year-old from Michoacán, Mexico, sits on a worn couch at Casa YMCA in Tijuana. He was deported two days earlier. Now, he's at the only shelter for unaccompanied minors in the city, trying to decide what to do next.

Read more
NPR Story
3:18 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Phoenix Sports Teams Look To Mexico For Fans

Fronteras Desk

MEXICO CITY — Phoenix-based professional sports teams have long reached out to the metro area’s large Latino population to cultivate new fans. But now they are seeking supporters across the border.

At a recent Phoenix Suns game, the US Airways arena is fairly full. Yet team president Jason Rowley says the Suns can do more to grow its international fan base.

Read more
NPR Story
10:45 am
Thu April 18, 2013

New Mexico Umpire Resigns After English-Only Call

In a stir of controversy, a New Mexico umpire who allegedly threatened to eject high school baseball players for speaking Spanish has resigned.

Umpire Corey Jones is accused of telling a first baseman not to speak Spanish during a game, and, when questioned by the school’s assistant coach, Jones allegedly stated, “Anyone who speaks Spanish — coaches or players — will be ejected.”

Read more
NPR Story
10:26 am
Thu April 18, 2013

New Mexico Umpire Resigns

In a stir of controversy, a New Mexico umpire who allegedly threatened to eject high school baseball players for speaking Spanish has resigned.

Umpire Corey Jones is accused of telling a first basemen not to speak Spanish during a game, and, when questioned by the school’s assistant coach, Jones allegedly stated, “Anyone who speaks Spanish — coaches or players — will be ejected.”

Read more
NPR Story
7:07 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Both Sides Find Things To Like, Hate About Immigration Bill

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 11:18 am

SAN DIEGO — At a Wednesday press conference in San Diego, immigrant rights activists were looking a little tired from having just tried to digest the 844-page immigration reform bill released overnight.

Read more
NPR Story
9:55 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Prolific Joshua Tree Bloom Could Signal Warming Climate

JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK — It’s bloom time for Joshua trees, the spikey sentinels of the Mojave Desert that stretches across the southwest.

They’re among the most bizarre-looking of desert flora. Though they’re technically trees, these spikey towers look more like a cross between a palm and a cactus.

Each spring, many Joshua trees send out large pineapple-shaped crowns of white-green flowers. This year, the blooms are especially large, and widespread.

Read more
NPR Story
9:49 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Full Text: Gang Of Eight's Immigration Bill

The blockbuster Senate bill aimed at overhauling our nation's immigration system is finally here. We have mapped some of the new pathways immigrants face, and have explored in-depth many of the problems facing the current system.

Read more
NPR Story
7:18 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Guest Worker Programs Have A Long History In U.S.

Fronteras Desk

EL PASO, Texas — Fulfilling the demand for unskilled labor is a big part of the immigration bill unveiled by a group of bipartisan senators this week.

Read more
NPR Story
4:53 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Proposed Immigration Bill Calls For Enforcement Expansions

TUCSON, Ariz. — One of the immigration reform measures being pushed by the Senate’s Gang of Eight would triple the number of immigrant prosecutions in Southern Arizona.

Read more
NPR Story
4:38 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Feds Have Long Way To Go To Clean Up Navajo Uranium Sites

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — The federal government is five years into cleaning up abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation. The Environmental Protection Agency met with Navajo leaders Tuesday to discuss the plan for the next five years. They still have a long way to go.

Read more
NPR Story
12:03 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

15 Companies That Profit From Border Security

Immigration reform supporters come to the cause for a variety of reasons, but one of the most commonly emphasized is the need to strengthen the country's borders.

Read more
NPR Story
12:02 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Gang Of Eight's New Pathways To Citizenship

The hotly anticipated bill to overhaul our nation's immigration system is expected to be presented Tuesday by a bipartisan group of senators. At stake are the lives of at least 11 million — that’s the number of people living here without proper immigration documents.

Read more

Pages