NPR News

Health
2:21 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Some Patients Lack Contraceptive Coverage Under Health Law, Study Finds

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Environment
2:21 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

California Cities Struggle To Enforce Mandatory Water Restrictions

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:40 pm

Gov. Jerry Brown ordered the state to cut back its water use by 25 percent overall and mandated specific targets for each city. But some are still figuring out how to enforce cutbacks, including in San Diego, where the target is 20 percent.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Social Media Buzz: Clinton's Logo, Ricky Gervais' Giraffe Tweet, Cheryl's Birthday

Hillary Clinton's new logo is a blue H with a red right-pointing arrow.

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:22 pm

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign has a new logo that’s causing buzz. British comedian Ricky Gervais set the Internet aflutter by tweeting a photo of hunter Rebecca Francis posing beside a dead giraffe. And Singapore T.V. host Kenneth Kong posted a logic problem on Facebook about finding Cheryl’s birthday, that has gone viral.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Study: Many Mothers Don't Wait Long Enough Between Pregnancies

Pregnant mom. (travelingtribe/Flickr)

The typical time between pregnancies for American mothers is 2.5 years, according to new research. Doctors say that is a healthy amount of time to wait. But a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that nearly a third of women space their births too close – fewer than 18 months between pregnancies.

The study found that “while there is no consensus on optimal IPI [interpregnancy interval], research has shown that short intervals (less than 18 months) and long intervals (60 months or more) were associated with higher risks of adverse health outcomes.”

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing Juror Looks Back

The McVeigh jury members address the media during a news conference in Denver, Colo., Saturday, June 14, 1997. From right to left are: Roger Brown, Fred Clarke, Doug Carr, Diane Faircloth, James Osgood, Tonya Stedman, Mike Leeper, Ruth Meier, Jonathon Candelaria, Martha Hite and Vera Chubb. (Michael S. Green/AP)

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 7:03 am

Just past the two-year anniversary of the bombing of the Boston Marathon, another horrific anniversary approaches. Oklahoma City residents will never forget April 19, 1995, when a bomb blast tore through the Alfred P. Murrah federal building, killing 168 people and injuring several hundred others.

Police tracked down Timothy McVeigh, a 26-year-old Persian Gulf War veteran and right-wing militia sympathizer. He was put on trial and ultimately put to death.

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Music Interviews
1:08 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

The Story Behind Mark Ronson's Hit Song 'Uptown Funk'

Mark Ronson is a music producer, DJ and guitarist who's recorded with Adele, Paul McCartney, Ghostface Killah, Lily Allen and Duran Duran, among others.
Astrid Stawiarz Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:43 pm

When singer Bruno Mars and producer Mark Ronson first landed on the instrumental track and a few lines of what would become the hit song "Uptown Funk," Ronson says the room was filled with electricity.

"There's nothing more exciting than that period of the song, because the potential is unlimited," Ronson tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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Shots - Health News
12:56 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Scientists Probe Puppy Love

A direct, friendly gaze seems to help cement the bond of affection between people and their pooches.
Dan Perez/Flickr

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:40 pm

It's a question that bedevils dog owners the world over: "Is she staring at me because she loves me? Or because she wants another biscuit?"

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

In Posthumous Riposte, Editor Of 'Charlie Hebdo' Targets 'Islamophobia'

Stephane "Charb" Charbonnier, editor of Charlie Hebdo, is seen on Sept.19, 2012. The late editor takes on politicians, the media and "Islamophobia" in a posthumously published book completed two days before he was killed Jan. 7.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:36 pm

Stephane Charbonnier, the editor of Charlie Hebdo who was killed in the Jan. 7 attack by two radical Islamists on the satirical magazine, is having the last word.

In a new book completed just two days before the attack that killed 12 people, Charbonnier, who was commonly known as "Charb," says the fight against Islamophobia protects Islam more than it does Muslims. The title of the 88-page book, published Thursday, translates to Letters to the Swindlers of Islamophobia who play into the Hands of Racists.

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Parallels
11:54 am
Thu April 16, 2015

The Fences Where Spain And Africa Meet

African migrants climb the fence that separates Morocco from the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in North Africa in February. Those who make it into Ceuta have reached Spanish — and European Union — soil. Their fate often depends on the country they came from. Some are deported, while others can apply for political asylum or for the status of economic migrant.
Reduan EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:40 pm

On a rocky beach in North Africa, a chain-link fence juts out into the Mediterranean Sea.

This is one of Africa's two land borders with Europe, at two Spanish cities on the African continent. Ceuta and Melilla are Spanish soil — and thus part of the European Union — separated from the rest of Europe by the Mediterranean, and separated from the rest of Africa by huge fences.

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Shots - Health News
11:38 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Study: Insurers Fail To Cover All Prescribed Contraceptives

Will the health plan pay for the contraceptives the doctor prescribes?
MediaforMedical/Emmanuel Rogue/Getty Images

Some women may be paying hefty fees for birth control pills, vaginal rings and emergency contraception, despite a federal requirement that insurers pay their full cost. And some women only have coverage for a less effective type of emergency contraception, according to a report released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Homeless Shelter Opts To Close Instead Of Accepting People On Drugs, Alcohol

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 1:07 pm

Faced with a state rule that links funding to the admission of people who are actively using drugs or alcohol, a group that runs a homeless shelter in Manchester, Conn., is choosing to close the 40-bed facility. More than half of the shelter's budget reportedly comes from the state.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Pro-Russia Journalist Shot Dead In Ukraine

Oles Buzyna, a Ukrainian journalist seen here in 2012 who was known for his pro-Russia views, was gunned down in broad daylight in Kiev on Thursday.
Sergei Vaganov AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:34 am

A senior Ukrainian journalist known for his pro-Russia stance has been shot dead in Kiev, one day after a former pro-Russia lawmaker was found dead in the Ukrainian capital.

Oles Buzyna, 45, had recently resigned as editor-in-chief of the daily newspaper Sevodnya. Ukraine's interior ministry said in a statement that he was killed Thursday afternoon by two masked gunmen shooting from a passing car, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
10:20 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Putin Defends Missile Deal With Iran, Says No Russian Troops In Ukraine

Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during an annual call-in show on Russian television in Moscow on Thursday.
Mikhail Klimentyev AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 3:50 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday defended his decision to sell a long-range air-defense missile system to Iran, criticized the West for its treatment of Moscow, called "tragic" the killing of an opposition figure and said Ukraine was not living up to commitments made in a recent peace deal.

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Shots - Health News
8:57 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Letters About Dense Breasts Can Lead To More Questions Than Answers

Catharine Becker of Fullerton, Calif., was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 43 despite having a clean mammogram. The mother of three didn't know she had dense breast tissue until after she was diagnosed.
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:18 pm

Earlier this year, Caryn Hoadley received an unexpected letter after a routine mammogram.

The letter said her mammogram was clean but that she has dense breast tissue, which has been linked to higher rates of breast cancer and could make her mammogram harder to read.

"I honestly don't know what to think about the letter," said Hoadley, 45, who lives in Alameda, Calif. "What do I do with that information?"

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Vatican Ends Scrutiny Of U.S. Nuns

Pope Francis talks with a delegation of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious during an audience in the pontiff's studio at the Vatican on Thursday. The Vatican announced the unexpected conclusion of a controversial overhaul of the main umbrella group of U.S. nuns.
L'Osservatore Romano AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:46 pm

Updated at 10:04 a.m. ET

The Vatican has announced an end to an overhaul of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious — an abrupt conclusion to a five-year doctrinal overhaul of the main umbrella group for nuns in the U.S. that began in 2012.

The Vatican said Thursday that it has accepted a report on the overhaul of the LCWR "marking the conclusion of the Doctrinal Assessment" of the umbrella group.

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Code Switch
8:19 am
Thu April 16, 2015

How The South Korean Government Made K-pop A Thing

Sun Hi (Megan Lee), Jodi (Louriza Tronco) and Corki (Erika Tham) star in Make It Pop.
Stephen Scott Nickelodeon

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It's All Politics
6:03 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Throwback Thursday: Reagan Announces Run For President

It's been 35 years since Ronald Reagan announced his run for president. He did so just two months before the Iowa caucuses, unlike the protracted campaigning that takes place today.
WJZ AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 11:49 am

Times in politics have changed.

Since it's the season for presidential campaign announcements, for evidence of just how much they've changed, look back 35 years to Ronald Reagan's announcement that he was running for president.

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The Two-Way
5:44 am
Thu April 16, 2015

South Korean President Promises To Raise Sewol Ferry, One Year After Tragedy

People pay tribute at a group memorial altar for victims of the sunken South Korean ferry Sewol at a remembrance hall in Ansan on Thursday.
Jung Yeon-Je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 8:21 am

Speaking on the first anniversary of a catastrophe that killed 304 people, President Park Geun-hye pledged Thursday to salvage the Sewol ferry, which capsized and sank during a trip to a resort island. Nine bodies are believed to remain inside the ship.

"Most of the victims were actually students from a single high school," NPR's Elise Hu reports, "so this obviously sent the country into deep grief — but also outrage, since the rescue effort was widely viewed as bungled."

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Europe
5:29 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Ex-ABBA Member Capitalizes On 'Mamma Mia!' Franchise

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:47 am

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Around the Nation
5:29 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Company Offers $70,000 A Year Minimum Wage

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:47 am

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The Two-Way
4:51 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Ocean Search Area For Lost Malaysian Airliner Is Set To Double

Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss (left), Malaysia's Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai (center) and Chinese Transport Minister Yang Chuantan shake hands after a news conference about Flight MH 370 on Thursday. The search zone for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight will be doubled if nothing is found in the huge undersea area now being scanned for wreckage.
Mohd Rasfan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:49 am

It has been more than a year since Malaysia Airlines Flight MH 370 was lost with 239 people on board. Officials now say they'll double the already huge search area in the southern Indian Ocean to 46,000 square miles if the plane isn't found by next month.

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Race
4:04 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Auction Canceled Of Art By Japanese-Americans In Internment Camps

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:03 pm

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NPR Story
3:42 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Desalination Plants: Drought Cure Or Growth Enabler?

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:47 am

Copyright 2015 KQED Public Media. To see more, visit http://www.kqed.org.

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NPR Story
3:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Students' Work Ethic Affected By Peer Groups, Desire To Be Popular

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:54 pm

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NPR Story
3:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Critics Oppose Making Holy Bible Tennessee's Official Book

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 11:48 am

Copyright 2015 Nashville Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wpln.org/.

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The state of Tennessee has a long list of official symbols.

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They include the Tennessee Walking Horse.

INSKEEP: The Tennessee cave salamander.

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Afghanistan
3:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Kabul Appears To Be More Tense Since U.S. Troop Drawdown

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:54 pm

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Parallels
1:59 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Islanders Pushed Out For U.S. Base Hope For End To 40-Year Exile

Chagossians weep at the grave of their parents on Peros Banos Island April 10, 2006. Fifteen elders are allowed to visit once a year.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 3:11 pm

One of the most important U.S. military bases in the world sits in the middle of the Indian Ocean on an atoll called Diego Garcia. It's the largest of the Chagos Islands, a British territory far from any mainland that is spread out across hundreds of miles. Thousands of people, called Chagossians, used to live on Diego Garcia.

The U.S. military moved in in the 1970s only after the British government forced the entire Chagossian population to leave.

For more than 40 years, the islanders have been fighting to return. Now, it seems they have a growing chance.

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U.S.
1:51 am
Thu April 16, 2015

A North Dakota Family Breaks The Silence On Gay Marriage

In rural North Dakota, where Melanie Hoffert grew up on her family farm, discussing subjects like homosexuality and same-sex marriage is often considered taboo.
Courtesy of Beacon Press

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 6:27 am

All this week, Morning Edition is listening to people think out loud about same-sex marriage in North Dakota, one of 13 states that still ban same-sex marriage. Thursday's story looks at discussions about same-sex marriage among families — a subject some feel is often too taboo to tackle.

Melanie Hoffert grew up on a farm near the town of Wahpeton, N.D. She called her new memoir Prairie Silence because around here, people prefer not to talk about hard things in the open.

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Shots - Health News
1:49 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Tylenol Might Dull Emotional Pain, Too

Paul Taylor Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:18 pm

A common pain medication might make you go from "so cute!" to "so what?" when you look at a photo of a kitten. And it might make you less sensitive to horrifying things, too. It's acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol. Researchers say the drug might be taking the edge off emotions — not just pain.

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Parallels
1:46 am
Thu April 16, 2015

An American Journalist Explains Why He Had To Flee Iraq

American journalist Ned Parker (foreground) is the Reuters bureau chief in Baghdad. He fled Iraq last week after receiving threats in response to reports on human rights abuses by Shiite militias allied with Iraq's government. He's shown here at Iraq's Foreign Ministry in 2007.
Courtesy of Ned Parker

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:05 am

When the U.S. withdrew its troops from Iraq in 2011, many American news organizations followed suit, scaling back or shutting down their bureaus. Ned Parker was among a handful of American journalists who continued to report from the country.

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