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The natural world is abuzz with the sound of animals communicating — crickets, birds, even grunting fish. But scientists learning to decode these sounds say the secret signals of African elephants — their deepest rumblings — are among the most intriguing calls any animal makes.

An unprecedented, class action lawsuit brought against one Southern California school district and its top officials could have a big impact on schools across the country.

On Thursday in Los Angeles, a U.S. District Court judge will preside over the first hearing in the suit against the Compton Unified School District. To understand the complaint, you need to understand Compton.

Robie's Country Store, in Hooksett, N.H., has become an almost ritual stop on the presidential campaign trail — one of those places where anyone who is running is pretty much guaranteed to make an appearance. The business isn't what it once was, but presidential hopefuls keep showing up.

The store has stood on the bank of the Merrimack River, between Concord and Manchester, since 1887. When the candidates get there, most know what's expected.

3 Firefighters Killed In Washington State Wildfire

Aug 19, 2015

Officials say three firefighters have been killed and three to four others have been injured trying to control a wildfire in Washington state.

Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said the firefighters died near the town of Twisp in the north-central part of the state.

The Associated Press reports the deaths came after the county emergency management department told residents to evacuate the area:

You may see new customer service technology at the airport soon. It's part of an effort by federal agencies to make it easier for people to give the government feedback, according to the Washington Post.

The equipment has a simple design, and it looks more like it belongs in a playroom than in an airport.

While Donald Trump's recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers.

The Washington, D.C.-based Migration Policy Institute released "An Analysis of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States by Country and Region of Birth." It's based on U.S. Census Bureau data.

When Washington state legalized recreational marijuana, people wondered if it would mean more stoned drivers on the roads. Two and a half years later, one trend is clear: Police are arresting more drivers with pot in their systems — but what's not clear yet is what that means for traffic safety.

One of the most prestigious names in health care is taking a stand on food.

This week, Cleveland Clinic announced it would sever ties with McDonald's. As of Sept. 18, the McDonald's branch located in the Cleveland Clinic cafeteria will turn off its fryers and close its doors for good. Its lease will not be renewed.

Rand Paul is trying to have it both ways — running both for president and re-election to his Kentucky Senate seat in 2016.

But whether he'll be able to keep that electoral insurance policy rests in the hands of Kentucky Republicans this weekend.

Kentucky law is clear: You can't run for president and U.S. Senate at the same time. But Paul has tried to get around that law, by pushing for the state to hold a nonbinding caucus instead of a primary in the presidential nominating process.

ISIS militants beheaded a renowned Syrian archaeologist in the ancient town of Palmyra, and then hung his body from one of the town's Roman columns.

NPR's Alice Fordham reported on the brutal murder of 81-year-old Khaled al-Asaad:

For now, federal authorities characterize the Justice Department inquiry into Hillary Clinton's private email server as a security situation: a simple matter of finding out whether classified information leaked out during her tenure as secretary of state, and where it went.

Except, former government officials said, that's not going to be so simple.

"I think that the FBI will be moving with all deliberate speed to determine whether there were serious breaches of national security here," said Ron Hosko, who used to lead the FBI's criminal investigative division.

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Thai police say they have video of a man who may be responsible for Monday's bombing in Bangkok. As we previously reported, the explosion killed at least 20 people.

As Michael Sullivan tells our Newscast unit from Bangkok, a sketch of the suspect was released Wednesday, and is based on images from surveillance cameras. The sketch shows a man apparently leaving a backpack at the Erawan shrine, minutes before the explosion took place.

Like a lot of students, 17-year-old Nick Bain says he really likes his school, but sometimes it can feel like a chore.

"It just feels a little bit like you just have to keep doing one thing after another, but without a whole lot of thinking about an education in general," says Nick.

So one day he decided to write down what he was doing every 15 minutes at the Colorado Academy in Denver.

Judging by some of the most pessimistic reports from California these days, the place is doomed. You can read all about the folly of trying to build cities in a desert.

Just this week, economists at the University of California, Davis, estimated that water shortages will cost the state's economy $2.7 billion this year. Many farmers are limiting the economic damage by ransacking the environment instead, draining underground aquifers.

In March 2013, a 20-foot-wide sinkhole opened up beneath the bedroom floor of a sleeping Florida man and swallowed him whole.

The body of Jeffrey Bush, 36, was never recovered and the house was razed. With the property roped off and the hole filled in, that should have been the tragedy's last scene.

Former U.S. Rep. Louis Stokes of Ohio, who was the state's first black congressman and who represented Cleveland and some of its neighboring suburbs for 30 years, has died. He was 90.

His death Tuesday was confirmed by a family statement and comes a month after Stokes revealed that he had been diagnosed with brain and lung cancer. The family statement read, in part:

KCRW DJ Chris Douridas joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to share some new summer music. There’s a bit of country and bluegrass with Pokey LaFarge and the Kiwi singer Marlon Williams. There are also some deep electro tracks with Maximum Balloon and the Flemish group Waar is Ken?

Security experts are telling multiple news outlets today that the leaked names of Ashley Madison customers appear to be real. Ashley Madison markets itself with the tagline, "Life is short. Have an affair." About one month ago it was reported that the site had been hacked and the names and credit card numbers of 37 million customers could be posted online.

The recent New York Times article on the work environment at Amazon has put a spotlight on the culture of the competitive workplace and the increasing difficulty of attaining a satisfying work-life balance.

Amazon culls its workforce annually, based in part on performance reviews from coworkers. It’s a data-driven system that could be coming to more companies soon.

Norovirus is a huge public health problem, sickening as many as 21 million people a year in the U.S. But for all the gastric distress it causes, there are still some basic, unanswered questions about the virus.

One biggie: When an ill person vomits, does norovirus become aerosolized? That is, can an ill person's vomiting launch tiny viral particles into the air, where they might waft into your mouth or onto surfaces that you would later touch?

Beloit College's annual "mindset list" is out. It's a series of historical and cultural references that will supposedly bewilder incoming college freshmen.

This year's list, for the Class of 2019, was curated by three professors at the small liberal arts college in Wisconsin. The school says it aims to show professors and counselors which references no longer resonate with younger generations.

A few entries on this year's list of 50 factoids about the Class of 2019 include:

The White House has hired its first openly transgender staff member. Raffi Freedman-Gurspan has been appointed as an outreach and recruitment director for presidential personnel in the White House Office of Presidential Personnel.

The 28-year-old previously worked as a policy adviser for the National Center for Transgender Equality's Racial and Economic Justice Initiative, and before that as a legislative director with Rep. Carl Sciortino's office.

Yvonne Craig, best known for her role as Batgirl in the iconic 1960s television series Batman, died Monday. She was 78.

Jared Fogle, the former Subway pitchman, is expected to admit that he paid for sex with two minors and participated in a scheme that secretly recorded 12 other children engaging in sexual acts.

As part of a deal cut with prosecutors, Fogle is expected to plead guilty to two federal counts stemming from the actions: the first that he distributed and received child pornography, and the second that he traveled across state lines and then paid for sex with two children.

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Chelsea Manning, the Army private convicted in the biggest leak of classified information in American history, has been found guilty of violating the rules at the Army's Fort Leavenworth prison in Kansas.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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