NPR News

Goats and Soda
12:06 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Dreams Of Hope And Happiness In Turbulent Yemen

These kids are Yemenis without a home. Fighting between government and rebel forces caused their families to flee to a refugee camp in Aden, where the youngsters find time for fun.
Stephanie Sinclair/VII

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 4:00 pm

It's hard to think about Yemen in a hopeful way. In fact, the country seems like the very definition of hopelessness.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

'Definite Evidence' Of Alien Life Within 20-30 Years, NASA Chief Scientist Says

This artist rendering shows Kepler-11, a sun-like star around which six planets orbit. A planet-hunting telescope is finding whole new worlds of possibilities in the search for alien life, including more than 50 potential planets that initially appear to be in habitable zones. The agency's chief scientist said Tuesday there will be "strong indications" of alien life within a decade.
NASA AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 12:13 pm

There will be "strong indications" of alien life within a decade and "definite evidence" of it within 20 to 30 years, NASA's chief scientist has said.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Boston Marathon Bombing Jury Finds Tsarnaev Guilty On All Counts

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 10:46 am

A jury in Boston has found 21-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all counts related to the 2013 bombings of the Boston Marathon. The twin bombings, carried out with his older brother, Tamerlan, killed three people and left 264 others wounded.

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Shots - Health News
12:02 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

What's My Chance Of Having A Baby? A Better Predictor Of IVF Success

In the technique known as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, a fertility specialist uses a tiny needle to inject sperm into an egg cell.
Mauro Fermariello Science Source

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 4:19 pm

Before a couple commit time, money and emotion to the process of in vitro fertilization, they want to know one thing: What are our chances of having a baby?

Success rates vary dramatically by age. In 2013, for example, 40 percent of IVF cycles performed in women who were under the age of 35 resulted in live births, compared with 4.5 percent for women older than 42.

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It's All Politics
10:51 am
Wed April 8, 2015

4 Things We Learned About What Bill Clinton Is Up To

Former President Bill Clinton wants to keep his foundation running, even if his wife becomes president and "whether I'm running it or not."
AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 2:51 pm

As Hillary Clinton is expected to officially launch her presidential campaign in the next couple of weeks, her famous, former president husband talked to Town & Country magazine, which went along with him to Haiti in February.

Here are four takeaways from that interview:

1. The Clinton Foundation is not going away — even if Hillary Clinton wins.

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NPR Ed
10:26 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Think Tuition Is Rising Fast? Try Room And Board

Universities can have a hard time resisting the lure of luxury, which keeps room and board prices rising.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 3:46 pm

Valerie Inniss took out $11,500 in student loans this year to pay for the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

None of it was for tuition.

The 21-year-old is on a four-year, full-tuition scholarship, won on the strength of her high school test scores. And she qualifies for the maximum federal Pell Grant — $5,730 — for low-income students.

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Animals
10:26 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Science Sticks Its Neck Out For Brontosaurus

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
9:44 am
Wed April 8, 2015

'My Heart Was Broken,' Says Father Of S.C. Man Slain By Police

In an image taken from video provided by an attorney representing the family of Walter Lamer Scott, Scott appears to be running away from City Patrolman Michael Thomas Slager, right, an instant before Slager opened fire. Scott was killed in the encounter.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 6:29 pm

The police officer who fatally shot his son "looked like he was trying to kill a deer running through the woods," says Walter Scott Sr. That officer, Michael Slager, now faces a murder charge in the death of Walter Scott, who was unarmed and running away from Slager when he was shot multiple times.

The deadly encounter in North Charleston, S.C., between Slager, who is white, and Scott, who was black, has reignited discussions over police use of force, particularly in minority communities.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Wed April 8, 2015

U.S. Service Member Killed In Shooting In Afghan City Of Jalalabad

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 2:12 pm

A U.S. service member was killed and several other American troops wounded when a man in an Afghan army uniform opened fire in the city of Jalalabad, a Pentagon official says.

NPR's Tom Bowman tells us there is no word on the condition of the wounded. The man in the Afghan uniform was shot and killed.

The incident occurred after a meeting between a senior U.S. official and the provincial governor in Jalalabad, according to a statement from the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.

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The Two-Way
6:29 am
Wed April 8, 2015

London Thieves Take Up To $300 Million In Gems In Easter Heist

In an elaborate crime that went undetected until Tuesday morning, thieves broke into a safe deposit center used by many jewelers. Here, a woman believed to be a police forensics officer emerges from the building.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 8:12 am

In a complex crime that relied on a descent down an elevator shaft and on heavy cutting equipment, thieves made away with up to $300 million in gems and other valuables stolen from a secure facility where jewelry stores often stow their holdings. It could go down as the richest heist in Britain's history.

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Music News
5:38 am
Wed April 8, 2015

'American Pie' Lyrics Sell At Auction For $1.2 Million

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 10:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "AMERICAN PIE")

DON MCLEAN: (Singing) Bye, bye, Miss American Pie.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:03 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Ferguson Voters Elect 2 Black Members To City Council

Rich Baranowski (left) and Tracy Hardy vote Tuesday in the Ferguson, Mo., municipal election. Three of the city's six seats will now be filled by black council members.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 8:13 am

In a first, the City Council in Ferguson, Mo., is now half white and half black, after voters added two more African-Americans to the six-member group. Voter turnout was reported at 30 percent in the majority-black community.

The voter turnout "surpasses recent municipal elections in Ferguson — and nearly doubles the roughly 16 percent turnout in the rest of St. Louis County," St. Louis Public Radio reports.

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Around the Nation
4:45 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Hungry Sea Lion Steals Man's Fish

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 10:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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It's All Politics
3:03 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Like Father, Like Son? Not Exactly When It Comes To Rand And Ron Paul

Ron Paul doesn't figure to be a major part of his son Rand's presidential campaign — despite Ron's having run in the last two presidential elections.
Ed Reinke AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 9:08 am

Ron Paul stood off to the side Tuesday as his son Rand announced he was running for president.

There was no speaking role for the elder Paul, 79. There was no ceremonial passing of the torch of "liberty."

There wasn't even a hearty thank you or nod to the father's raucous presidential campaigns that laid the groundwork for the son's launch.

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NPR Story
2:58 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Obama's Remarks On Nuclear Deal Provide Fuel For Critics

President Obama is pressing hard for a nuclear agreement with Iran. But critics have cited his remark that Iran's 'breakout' time for acquiring nuclear material for a bomb might be very brief as parts of the deal expire.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 12:08 pm

As President Obama makes his sales pitch for a nuclear deal with Iran, critics have seized on his remark that Iran's "breakout" time for acquiring the nuclear material needed for a bomb could shrink as restrictions ease after about 13 years.

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Middle East
2:58 am
Wed April 8, 2015

What Would A Nuclear Deal With Iran Really Mean?

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 10:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:58 am
Wed April 8, 2015

U.S. Hopes Rift With Venezuela Won't Overshadow Americas Summit

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 1:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Before the next election brings his term to an end, President Obama is working to re-establish ties with Cuba.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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NPR Story
2:58 am
Wed April 8, 2015

TV Ads Financed With Secret Money Attack Paul On Day 1 Of Presidential Bid

Sen. Rand Paul launched his 2016 presidential campaign Tuesday with a combative message against both Washington and his fellow Republicans, declaring that "we have come to take our country back."
Carolyn Kaster ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 10:20 am

Welcome to the 2016 presidential campaign. Republican Rand Paul officially entered the race Tuesday, and was greeted with a TV ad calling him "wrong and dangerous" on Iran. The money behind the ad is secret.

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Shots - Health News
1:45 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Doctors Test Tumor Paint In People

Blaze Bioscience is commercially developing the "paint," which glows when exposed to near-infrared light.
Courtesy of Blaze Bioscience

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 3:52 pm

A promising technique for making brain tumors glow so they'll be easier for surgeons to remove is now being tested in cancer patients.

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The Two-Way
8:41 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Chicago Mayor Emanuel Keeps His Job In Tough Runoff Election

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel shakes hands at a campaign office Tuesday, as voters gave him a second term. He won a runoff election against Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 4:24 am

Pushed to the brink in an unprecedented runoff election, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel used a huge campaign war chest and a softened image to survive the threat and win a second term in office.

Emanuel defeated Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, who had championed the city's poor and disadvantaged in hopes of becoming Chicago's first Latino mayor, in a race that mirrored divisions between the "Wall Street" and the liberal/progressive wings within the Democratic Party nationally.

In official totals, Emanuel won nearly 56 percent of the vote to Garcia's 44 percent.

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The Two-Way
8:32 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Connecticut Wins 3rd Straight Women's Basketball Title, 5th In 7 Years

Notre Dame guard Lindsay Allen shoots against Connecticut forward Breanna Stewart as Connecticut guard Moriah Jefferson looks on April 7 during the first half of the NCAA women's college basketball championship game in Tampa, Fla.
John Raoux AP

It's the kind of long-term dominance only the New York Yankees, Montreal Canadiens or John Wooden's UCLA teams could rival: Since 1995, the University of Connecticut women's basketball team has basically had coin-flip odds of winning a women's basketball championship.

The Huskies took home their tenth trophy in that span on Tuesday night, beating Notre Dame 63-53 in a rematch of the 2014 title game, which UConn won 79-58.

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The Two-Way
6:50 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Stan Freberg, A Genius Of American Advertising, Dies

Stan Freberg and his wife, Hunter, pose for a photo in Beverly Hills, Calif., in 2003.
Matt Sayles AP

Mad Men had nothing on Stan Freberg, a genius of American advertising. In the 1950s and '60s, he created countless memorable ads using pointed humor.

Freberg was one of the first to inject satire into commercials.

Here he appears off-screen, trying to persuade a snob to eat a prune:

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The Salt
5:18 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Tea Tuesdays: How Tea + Sugar Reshaped The British Empire

The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp by Rembrandt, 1632. Here, Tulp explains musculature matters. Elsewhere, the good doctor was promoting the health virtues of tea.
Rembrandt Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 12:30 pm

Coffee and tea both landed in the British isles in the 1600s. In fact, java even got a head start of about a decade. And yet, a century later, tea was well on its way to becoming a daily habit for millions of Britons — which it remains to this day.

So how did tea emerge as Britain's hot beverage of choice?

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NPR Story
4:48 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Stan Freberg, Advertising Satirist, Dies at 88

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 7:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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The Two-Way
4:37 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

South Carolina Police Officer Charged With Murder After Shooting Man In Back

Michael Slager, a North Charleston, S.C., police officer, has been charged with murder in the killing of a black man who was running away from him.
Charleston County Sheriff's Office

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 8:30 pm

A white police officer who shot and killed a black man after a traffic stop was charged with murder in North Charleston, S.C., on Tuesday.

The Post and Courier, a newspaper in Charleston, reports that officials said a video, which shows officer Michael Slager, 33, firing at 50-year-old Walter Scott as he fled, played a role in the decision.

The paper reports:

"Mayor Keith Summey added during a news conference that Slager's 'bad decision' prompted his arrest.

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All Tech Considered
4:25 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

The Risky Boom In Carefree Social Payment Apps

Apps like Venmo promise easy, carefree money transfers between friends.
Noah Nelson Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 5:54 pm

The other morning, I asked my friend Amanda Mae Meyncke, a writer here in Los Angeles, to explain an app to me.

I used my debit card to pay for our order of coffee and toast, and then got her to pay me back with this app she uses, Venmo.

It's what's known as a peer-to-peer finance app, which is Silicon Valley's way of saying that it lets people pay each other without handling cash or swiping cards. People like to use it to split bills.

To get started, she opened up the app.

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The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

An Edward Snowden Statue Was Replaced By A Hovering Snowden Image Last Night

An art collective installed an Edward Snowden projection in a Brooklyn park Monday night, after a bust of Snowden was removed by authorities park earlier that day.
Kyle Depew The Illuminator Art Collective

Yesterday in a Brooklyn park, anonymous artists erected a large bust of Edward Snowden, who leaked National Security Agency documents. Animal New York has details:

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The Two-Way
3:14 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

U.N. Demands Access To Besieged Palestinian Camp In Damascus

A man stands on a staircase inside a demolished building in the Yarmouk Palestinian refugee camp in the Syrian capital, Damascus, on Monday.
Youssef Karwashan AFP/Getty Images

The U.N. Security Council is calling for immediate humanitarian access to help thousands of people trapped in the Yarmouk Palestinian camp in southern Damascus.

Yarmouk's 18,000 residents have been living under Syrian military siege for the past two years. But their situation has grown even worse over the past week, as the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS, made a sudden power grab from the neighboring suburbs.

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Goats and Soda
3:08 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

The Second Most Dangerous Country For Land Mines Begins To De-Mine

A Colombian soldier searches for land mines laid by rebel fighters.
RAUL ARBOLEDA AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 5:54 pm

"My father was 79," says Donaldo Gomez, who lives in the steep Andes Mountains of Colombia. "He wasn't sick a day in his life. And then he gets killed by a mine!"

Gomez, whose father died in 2003, lives in an area that was once swarming with guerrillas. When the Colombian army moved into the region a few years ago, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, planted land mines to try to stop them. The same thing happened in many parts of the country.

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Shots - Health News
3:08 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Medical Students Jump In To Help The Uninsured

NYU medical student Sara Stream (left) examines dancer Jazlyn Caing, who visited the clinic for low-grade orthopedic and respiratory problems.
Fred Mogul/WNYC

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 5:54 pm

At an Institute for Family Health center near Union Square in New York City, medical student Sara Stream asks a new patient named Alicia what brings her in. The 34-year-old woman arrived last summer from Guatemala, and says she hasn't been seen by a doctor in many years.

Her list of ailments is long.

"I have trouble seeing, headaches, problems with my stomach," says Alicia, who declined to use her full name, because she is in the country illegally. "I feel depressed."

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