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Scientists from 13 federal agencies have drafted a report, leaked to several news organizations, which finds that temperatures in the U.S. are rising and human activity — especially greenhouse gas emissions — is “primarily responsible.” Some scientists have expressed concerns that the Trump administration will suppress the report, since Trump and members of his cabinet doubt the effect of human contribution to climate change.

If vegetables are the monarchs of nutritious eating, fruits have always been part of the royal court — not quite as important, but still worthy of respect. But now that nutrition guidelines are cracking down on sugar, some people are questioning fruits' estimable role in a healthy diet.

It's a hot summer day, and 8-year-old Zak Ballenger and his 5-year-old sister, Alison, are doing something they've never done in Paris.

They're diving into the cold, murky waters of a city canal.

"I like splashing around," Zak says, "because it's hot outside."

His mom, Celina Ballenger, is a 38-year-old nurse. She says she couldn't afford a vacation this year.

"So we've come here because we can't go out of Paris," she says.

Updated at 12:44 p.m. ET

South African President Jacob Zuma survived the sixth push for a vote of no confidence Tuesday — and for the first time, the vote was held by secret ballot. The embattled Zuma's African National Congress party, which controls Parliament, overcame speculation that a secret vote might prove to be his undoing.

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Same-sex marriage will be legal in Australia by Christmas, the country's attorney general says. But the question is, how will that happen? The push for a plebiscite has stalled in the Senate, forcing the government to plan for a potential postal vote on the issue.

From Australia's ABC:

"It would cost $122 million and instead of being run by the Electoral Commission, it would be conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

On a steamy August afternoon in McLean, Va., not far from CIA headquarters, Daniel Hoffman sits on a coffee shop terrace and reminisces about summer afternoons spent in a different place.

"There's a tennis court, and a little dacha with a sauna," says Hoffman. "And then a big dacha where families could go and get out of the city in the summer and relax."

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It's a fall tradition: Students don college sweatshirts and their parents, meanwhile, sweat the tuition bills.

One flash-in-the-pan movie this summer even featured a couple, played by Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler, who start a casino to cope with their kids' college costs.

Annual tuition hikes have been pretty much a given in higher ed, but recently, there are signs that the decades-long rise in college costs is nearing a peak.

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The Little Boy Who Escaped From Boko Haram

Aug 8, 2017

The boy.

Picture huge eyes, a beautiful smile and a sadness no child his age should have to endure. That is the story of a young boy who is a survivor of Boko Haram abduction and captivity in northeastern Nigeria — as well as military detention and investigation.

For his own safety, we're not giving the boy's name or where he comes from.

Scientists have created an electronic wafer that reprogrammed damaged skin cells on a mouse's leg to grow new blood vessels and help a wound heal.

The epidemic of drug overdose deaths has hit home for the mayor of Nashville, Tenn. Her 22-year-old son, Max Barry, died last month of an overdose near Denver.

And for the first time since tragedy struck her family, Mayor Megan Barry spoke publicly Monday to call on families to have frank and difficult conversations about addiction.

To see this month's total solar eclipse, the first one to be visible from the contiguous United States in nearly 40 years, all Donald Liebenberg will have to do is open his front door and step outside.

"It's a really special treat to be able to have one in my driveway," says Liebenberg, who has trekked to Turkey, Zambia, China and Pukapuka, a remote island in the Pacific, to see past eclipses.

A task force is recommending changes that could loosen protections for the greater sage grouse, a Western bird species renowned for its elaborate mating dance.

The report comes out of a review by the Trump administration of a massive Obama-era conservation plan for the bird which is imperiled by loss of habitat.

The administration says the revisions are aimed at giving states more flexibility. But critics argue that the changes favor mining and petroleum companies and could hurt the bird's long-term prospects.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has proposed spending $275 million to upgrade defenses against an invading force. The enemy? A fish. Specifically, Asian carp that are threatening to break through to the Great Lakes.

A four-floor San Francisco mansion at 26 Presidio Terrace was recently on the market for $14.5 million; 30 Presidio Terrace, a neighbor in the gated community, last sold for $9.5 million.

But Presidio Terrace itself? As in, the street? The strip of pavement these tony residents rely on to reach their front doors? The private road the homeowners association has owned for more than a century?

In a brief BBC cartoon posted to YouTube late last December, a high-ranking Roman soldier and his family tackle the challenges of daily life in ancient Britain. The dad is off helping build the famed Hadrian's wall at the province's far northern edge; the son tries to make right for losing his father's scarf. Everyone ends up happy ever after.

For the first time, a generation of children is going through adolescence with smartphones ever-present. Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, has a name for these young people born between 1995 and 2012: "iGen."

She says members of this generation are physically safer than those who came before them. They drink less, they learn to drive later and they're holding off on having sex. But psychologically, she argues, they are far more vulnerable.

Three Boy Scouts have died after a sailboat they were aboard struck a low-hanging power line on a lake east of Dallas, Texas, over the weekend.

The Scouts were sailing in a Hobie Cat on the Lake O' the Pines when the catamaran's mast snagged the transmission cable.

German scientist Matthias Schmidt wants to extract rare earth metals from abandoned mines using bacteria. He has an unlikely partner — Nedal Said, a Syrian refugee scientist who escaped Aleppo.

Think of the swastika and chances are that what comes to mind is the murderous regime of Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany.

But the symbol is at least 5,000 years old and is incorporated into Hindu, Buddhist and Jain iconography. Even today, in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia it is not uncommon to see the symbol painted on buildings and vehicles as a sign of good fortune.

Well-trained guide dogs are important for visually impaired people who rely on them. But many puppies bred to be guide dogs flunk out of training programs.

A study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the way a puppy's mother raises it may be the key to the dog's success, or failure. A research team at the University of Pennsylvania found that puppies destined for guide dog training are more likely to fail if they're coddled by their mothers.

A top former war crimes prosecutor has quit the U.N.'s Independent Commission of Inquiry on Syria, over what she described as the Security Council's lack of political will to hold the perpetrators of war crimes accountable.

"I give up. The states in the Security Council don't want justice," Carla Del Ponte said in comments to the Swiss publication Blick, as quoted by The Associated Press. "I can't any longer be part of this commission which simply doesn't do anything."

Her departure means only two members remain on the panel.

You might think that, after thousands of years of observing total solar eclipses, science-minded folks would have exhausted what can be learned from this awesome natural spectacle.

You would be wrong.

I never intended to become a vegetarian – least of all for love.

That all changed one night in a seafood restaurant in Boston.

I was out with the man I'd just started dating. Sajan is from an Indian family in Montreal, he had been a vegetarian since childhood, and he was struggling to convince the waiter to make something – anything – he could eat.

I'd been looking forward to a nice grilled fish or maybe some mussels simmered in something zesty. But in that moment, I realized Sajan would be lucky to get a dish of penne with tomato sauce.

Three-quarters of Americans believe that North Korea's nuclear program is a "critical threat" to the United States, according to a new survey released by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

Amazon and e-books have walloped brick-and-mortar bookstores across the country. But in the Washington, D.C., area, some shops appear to be bouncing back. At least five small, independent bookstores have opened locally in the last two years. And more are on the way.

Does all this activity mark a new chapter for neighborhood bookstores? Ally Schweitzer (@allyschweitzer) from Here & Now contributor WAMU talked to shop owners in D.C. to find out.

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