NPR News

The Two-Way
7:25 am
Tue March 17, 2015

U.S. Returns Dozens Of Looted Artifacts To Iraq

Some of the artifacts that were handed over to Iraq during a ceremony Monday in Washington, D.C.
Jackie Northam NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:31 pm

The U.S. returned dozens of artifacts to the Iraqi government Monday. The cultural treasures, some dating back more than 4,000 years, were looted from Iraq and smuggled into the United States.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:22 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Israel's Election: Exit Polls Show Netanyahu's Likud, Opposition In Tight Race

An Israeli woman votes with her daughter at a polling station in the coastal city of Haifa on Tuesday. Israel faces an unpredictable election to determine whether Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will remain in power.
Ahmad Gharabli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:53 pm

Updated at 6:52 p.m.

Exit polls released after the close of voting in Israel's national election show that the race is too close to call.

Israel's Channel 1 and Channel 10 both said Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Likud party and Isaac Herzog's Zionist Union secured 27 seats each in the 120-seat Knesset. Channel 2, meanwhile, have Likud 28 seats and the Zionist Union 27. The numbers were published by Haaretz.

Read more
NPR Ed
5:03 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Q&A: Raising Kids Who Want To Read

There's a big difference between teaching kids to read and teaching them to love reading.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 7:10 am

In his new book, Raising Kids Who Read, Daniel Willingham wants to be clear: There's a big difference between teaching kids to read and teaching them to love reading.

And Willingham, a parent himself, doesn't champion reading for the obvious reasons — not because research suggests that kids who read for pleasure do better in school and in life.

Read more
Strange News
3:56 am
Tue March 17, 2015

It's Hard Getting Work When The Government Says You're Dead

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
World
3:34 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Four Tropical Cyclones At Once: How Unusual Is That?

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Middle East
3:34 am
Tue March 17, 2015

A History Of West Bank Settlements

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Games & Humor
3:34 am
Tue March 17, 2015

She's Behind The Billy: Hide And Seek At Ikea

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
It's All Politics
2:32 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Why Federal Budgets Aren't What You Think They Are

For all the attention the president's and Congress' budget proposals receive, they don't actually fund any program or levy any taxes. They're more about politics.
Jon Elswick AP

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 8:44 am

As Republican leaders in the House and Senate unveil their proposed budgets this week, here is the most important thing to remember about the federal budget: It isn't really a budget.

Read more
National Security
1:22 am
Tue March 17, 2015

In Intense Desert Training, Marine Women Fight For Place On Front Lines

Female and male Marines prepare for a live-fire exercise at Twentynine Palms, a training camp in the Mojave Desert.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 3:03 pm

In the dry and craggy hills of California's Mojave Desert, Capt. Ray Kaster tries to shout over the din of a machine gun to be heard by Alpha Company, the unit of Marines he's working with during a month of rigorous instruction at Twentynine Palms training center.

Read more
Parallels
1:21 am
Tue March 17, 2015

A New Community Rises In The West Bank ... And It's Not Israeli

A Palestinian family leaves the visitors center at Rawabi.
Tanya Habjouqa for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 8:23 am

Palestinian investor Bashar Masri is building an entirely new city in the West Bank. It's a huge investment, with 5,000 new homes for tens of thousands of families. And, in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, it's also a political statement.

As we approached this new city of Rawabi, north of Ramallah, we saw a row of high-rise apartment buildings topped by construction cranes. Scaffolding surrounds the minaret of an incomplete mosque. Nobody has moved in yet.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:39 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

UConn, Notre Dame, South Carolina, Maryland Earn No. 1 Seeds In NCAA Women's Bracket

Members of Connecticut's women's basketball team react after their 84-70 victory over USF in an NCAA college basketball game in the finals of the American Athletic Conference tournament. UConn is the returning champ in this year's women's bracket.
Fred Beckham AP

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:40 am

The NCAA has announced the women's basketball bracket for 2015. UConn (32-1), Notre Dame (31-2), South Carolina (30-2) and Maryland (30-2) have all earned No. 1 seeds.

The NCAA also says five schools are making their first appearances in the tournament this century: New Mexico State, Ohio, Seton Hall, Tennessee State and Northwestern.

Read more
Goats and Soda
6:03 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

If You're One Of The World's 382 Million Diabetics, Your Wages May Dip

The blue circle is the symbol of diabetes — carried here by students marching in a World Diabetes Day rally in Kolkata, India.
Bikas Das AP

Whenever I hear statistics that diabetes costs the U.S. $245 billion a year — and billions more globally — these numbers feel too big to get my head around.

So a new analysis — which attempts to break down the cost-per-person toll of diabetes in countries around the globe — caught my attention.

Read more
World
6:01 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Cyclone Created Almost 'Complete' Destruction In Vanuatu

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
It's All Politics
5:03 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Obama, 2016 Contenders Deal With Changing Attitudes On Marijuana

Polls show changing American opinion on marijuana, and it's having an effect on politics.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 9:26 am

The divide between Republicans and Democrats on pot politics is narrowing, President Barack Obama said in an interview Monday.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:33 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Clues To Autism, Schizophrenia Emerge From Cerebellum Research

Jonathan Keleher talks with a colleague, Rafael Wainhaus, at work. Keleher was born without a cerebellum, but his brain has developed work-arounds for solving problems of balance and abstract thought.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 2:27 pm

A new understanding of the brain's cerebellum could lead to new treatments for people with problems caused by some strokes, autism and even schizophrenia.

That's because there's growing evidence that symptoms ranging from difficulty with abstract thinking to emotional instability to psychosis all have links to the cerebellum, says Jeremy Schmahmann, a professor of neurology at Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Read more
Music
4:33 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

In South Africa, Soulful Music Delivers Serious Messages

The newest album by The Muffinz, Do What You Love, tackles heavy issues such as politics, race and education.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:21 pm

Read more
Technology
3:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

What Cockroaches With Backpacks Can Do. Ah-mazing

An attempt to build the perfect cockroach cyborg.
Carlos Sanchez, Ph.D. student of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 9:48 am

Cockroaches are widely despised. They're attracted to filth. They frighten people, even give them nightmares.

But for a team of scientists at Texas A&M University, the roach is a hero: the first animal that humans might successfully transform into a robot, a hybrid of insect and machine that we can send anywhere to be our eyes and ears.

The Perfect Roach

Professor Hong Liang opens the door to a small laboratory with hundreds, maybe thousands, of cockroaches. It's not for the faint of heart.

Read more
Law
3:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Officers Recall Night Of Battle With Boston Marathon Bombing Suspects

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 6:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
3:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

FEMA's Appeals Process Favored Insurance Companies Almost Every Time

Doug Quinn's ranch house in Toms River, N.J., was heavily damaged by flooding during Hurricane Sandy. His insurance company gave him half the value of his home and when he appealed, FEMA sided with the insurance company.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 1:15 pm

FEMA has taken the unprecedented step of reopening all Superstorm Sandy flood claims because thousands of homeowners said insurance companies intentionally lowballed damage estimates.

Similar allegations surfaced in 2004 after Hurricane Isabel struck the Mid-Atlantic. To answer critics then, FEMA formalized an appeals process.

That appeals process has gone against Sandy victims almost every time, statistics show.

Read more
U.S.
3:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

California Judges Must Cut Ties With The Boy Scouts

The California Supreme Court ban prohibits state judges from belonging to nonprofit youth organizations that practice discrimination. That includes Boy Scouts, which has restricted gay troop leaders.
David Manning Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 12:52 pm

California has banned state court judges from belonging to the Boy Scouts. The move extends an earlier ban on judges' belonging to groups that discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation that had an exemption for youth groups. Judges have one year to sever their ties with the Boy Scouts.

Judges are already banned from joining lots of groups that other people can belong to. For example, they can't be members of country clubs that don't admit Jews or women.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:30 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Gunfire, Bombs And An Arrest: Boston Police Detail Tsarnaev's Capture For Court

A still image from surveillance video that was entered as evidence shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in 2013, in a handout photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston. Tsarnaev, 21, is accused of killing three people and injuring 264 with a pair of homemade bombs at the race's crowded finish, as well as fatally shooting a police officer three days later.
Handout Photo Reuters /Landov

Police officers testifying at the trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev described a gunbattle and powerful explosions Monday, recalling the death of Tsarnaev's older brother and the process that ended an intense manhunt for the pair.

Tsarnaev's attorneys have admitted that he was involved in the deadly bombing and the events that followed. But they also insist he was led into the operation by his older brother, and they say he doesn't deserve the death penalty.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:08 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

War Criminals Next Door: Immigration Division Brings Violators To Justice

Salvadoran Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova, shown in an undated photo, is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four Americans in 1980.
AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 3:48 pm

An appeals panel in Florida has upheld a deportation order against a former defense minister of El Salvador, who is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four American churchwomen in 1980. Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova was allowed to retire in the U.S. in 1989. Now, a little known unit of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is trying to expel him as well as others charged with human rights abuses.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:05 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

I'm Mike Huckabee, And I Approve This ... Infomercial?

In an infomercial for Barton Publishing's Diabetes Solution Kit Huckabee says he knows diabetes can be reversed "because I did it and today, you can too."
Getty Images

Mike Huckabee has always had the reputation as a candidate who does things outside the box.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Robert Durst Charged With Murder, May Face Death Penalty

This booking photo provided by the Orleans Parish Sheriff's Office shows Robert Durst after his arrest Saturday in New Orleans on an extradition warrant to Los Angeles. Durst's return to LA has been delayed by authorities in New Orleans.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 7:00 pm

Updated at 8:11 p.m. ET

The Los Angeles County District Attorney's office has charged Robert Durst with one count of first-degree murder in the 2000 death of Susan Berman. A statement announcing the charge also said that Durst is being held without bail in New Orleans, after being arrested Saturday by FBI agents. The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office says the charge against Durst makes him eligible for the death penalty. The case is still under investigation by the Los Angeles Police Department.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:29 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Why Many Smart, Low-Income Students Don't Apply To Elite Schools

Kristen Hannah Perez, a low-income, high-achieving student from Celina, Texas, plans to attend Dartmouth€ College next fall.
Shereen Meraji/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 6:01 pm

Right now, high school seniors across the country are trying hard not to think about what is — or isn't — coming in the mail.

They're anxiously awaiting acceptance letters (or the opposite) from their top-choice colleges and universities. But this story isn't about them. It's about a big group of seniors who could get into great schools but don't apply: high-achieving students from low-income families who live outside of America's big cities.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:25 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Missed Abortion Language Tangles Senate's Trafficking Bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he won't let the chamber vote on Loretta Lynch — the nominee to become the next attorney general — until the Senate passes its human trafficking bill.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 6:01 pm

A once widely supported Senate bill that would create a fund for human trafficking victims has hit a snag over language Democrats say they didn't know was in the bill — a provision that would bar funds collected under the measure from being used to pay for abortions. And the impasse over that language now threatens to delay other Senate business, like confirming a new attorney general.

Read more
NPR Story
2:06 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Netanyahu Trailing Slightly Before Israel’s Election Tomorrow

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is trailing ever so slightly behind his opponents in the Labor Party, just before tomorrow’s parliamentary election. That’s according to the latest and last poll before voters cast their ballots tomorrow.

Read more
NPR Story
2:06 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

States Scramble To Comply With Fed ID Cards

Increased enforcement of the federal REAL ID Act means Idaho driver's licenses may soon be unacceptable as ID at airports. (Idaho Transportation Department)

If you have a driver’s license you probably use it for more than driving: you verify your credit card, you prove your age if you want to buy a beer, you prove your identity to get on a plane.

But what if you showed your driver’s license and it was no good?

That’s starting to happen to people in a number of states that have yet to fully comply with the federal government’s REAL ID Act.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jessica Robinson reports from Idaho.

Read more
NPR Story
2:06 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Combating Bait And Switch In The Seafood Industry

The plan to stop seafood fraud will create a system to detect black market fishing and seafood fraud, and a system to track seafood from its harvest, all the way to U.S. port for market. (Bill Dickinson/Flickr)

Fish is a slippery business. Managing and policing the seafood industry has proved challenging through the years with reports of over-fishing, controversies about fish farming, and issues of oceanic pollution. Now, we can add seafood fraud to that list.

On Sunday, a task force convened by the Obama administration released an action plan to stop seafood fraud.

Read more
NPR Ed
1:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Nancie Atwell Of Maine Wins $1 Million Global Teaching Prize

Nancie Atwell (center) poses with former U.S. President Bill Clinton (left) and Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, prime minister of the United Arab Emirates and ruler of Dubai, after she won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize in Dubai on Sunday.
Kamran Jebreili AP

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 3:06 pm

This weekend, Maine teacher Nancie Atwell was awarded the first Global Teacher Prize, a $1 million award intended to be the "Nobel Prize of teaching."

Growing up, Atwell, 63, never expected to become a teacher, or even to go to college. But from the moment she began teaching in 1973, Atwell says she felt right at home.

"I am so inspired by all my students, but especially the seventh- and eighth-graders," she says. "They are so uninhibited and if you ask them to do something they will just work their heads and hearts off."

Read more

Pages