NPR News

Governing
2:40 pm
Mon April 16, 2012

Expert: Proud Secret Service 'Furious' Over Incident

President Obama speaks at the San Pedro Claver church in Cartagena, Colombia, on Sunday. An expert on the Secret Service tells NPR that Obama's security was never breached in the incident that led to 11 U.S. Secret Service agents being sent home amid allegations that they hired prostitutes in Cartagena.
Carolyn Kaster AP

The Secret Service, which has been offering protection to presidents since 1902, has long enjoyed one of the most sterling reputations of any government agency.

That reputation has been tarnished by allegations that agents hired prostitutes in Colombia in advance of President Obama's trip there.

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The Record
2:00 pm
Mon April 16, 2012

Andrew Love Of The Memphis Horns Has Died

Andrew Love (left) and Wayne Jackson pose for a studio portrait in 1965.
Gilles Petard Redferns

Saxophonist Andrew Love of the Memphis Horns has died. Love, who had Alzheimer's disease, died on April 12 at his home in Memphis. He was 70 years old.

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Around the Nation
1:38 pm
Mon April 16, 2012

For One Soldier, Rap Is A Powerful Postwar Weapon

In 2010 US Army veteran Jeff Barillaro returned from Iraq with severe PTSD. Since then Barillaro, whose stage name is "Solider Hard," has been rapping about his struggles and performing for troops, veterans, and military families across the US.
Erik M. Lunsford NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:53 am

When Jeff Barillaro came home from fighting the war in Iraq, he felt lost, like thousands of veterans do. He didn't have a mission anymore.

But now, through music, he's found one: Under the stage name Soldier Hard, Barillaro raps — about how war has changed troops and their families. Other vets and their family members are now turning to his music, because they say he's speaking to them.

On a recent morning, the National Guard Armory in Evansville, Ind., looks and sounds like any military base in the country.

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World Cafe
12:50 pm
Mon April 16, 2012

Haim On 'World Cafe: Next'

The Haim sisters are Danielle, Este and Alana.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 3:41 pm

After playing shows with their parents as children, the members of Haim now work as a serious stand-alone act. The Haim sisters are Danielle, Este and Alana, and their childhood experience of performing live has shaped them into a musical force as young adults. They first hit the L.A. music scene a few years ago — when each of the sisters was pursuing music, mostly in separate contexts — but their relatively recent decision to work together was inevitable.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Mon April 16, 2012

Pulitzer Prizes Coming Up

(The awards were announced just after 3 p.m. ET.)

For its "distinguished ... reporting on significant issues of local concern," reporter Sara Ganim and The Patriot News of Harrisburg, Pa., have won a 2012 Pulitzer Prize for uncovering the so-called Penn State scandal.

Other prize winners, which were just announced, include:

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The Salt
11:41 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Fast Food In The U.S. Has Way More Salt Than In Other Countries

In the United States, you get the extra salt for free.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 1:46 pm

Want extra salt with that fast-food meal? Then buy it in the United States, where chicken dishes, pizzas, and even salads are loaded with far more salt than in Europe and Australia, according to new research.

The McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in the United States have more than twice as much salt as their sister nuggets in the United Kingdom. That's 1.6 grams of salt for every 100 grams of American nugget, compared with 0.6 grams in the U.K.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Mon April 16, 2012

World Bank Chooses U.S.-Backed Kim To Be Its Next President

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 2:11 pm

The World Bank's executive directors have chosen Dr. Jim Yong Kim to be the development agency's next president.

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The Picture Show
11:05 am
Mon April 16, 2012

You're Not Alone: Taxpayers Have Been Miserable For Decades

Alfred Eisenstaedt Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Misery loves company. Multitudes are no doubt making the last-minute scramble to finish taxes today. If that's the case for you, perhaps you can take solace in the fact that this tax misery is a long-lived American tradition.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Key Players In Federal Agency's Vegas Scandal Due At Hearing

At a sometimes heated hearing today where members of the House got to express outrage, the man at the center of the General Services Administration scandal refused to testify.

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The Salt
10:21 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Is 'Tuna Scrape' The 'Pink Slime' Of Sushi?

Spicy tuna roll, or spicy tuna goo?
iStockphoto.com

The fact that there has been a salmonella outbreak among people who eat sushi isn't super surprising; raw seafood does pose more health risks than cooked fish.

But the fact that the fish implicated in the outbreak is something called "tuna scrape" sure got our attention here at The Salt.

According to the Food and Drug Administration's recall notice, tuna scrape is "tuna backmeat, which is specifically scraped off from the bones, and looks like a ground product." In other words, tuna hamburger.

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Law
10:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Administration Bucks Precedent, Pays Out A Billion

The Justice Department and 41 Native American tribes recently announced a roughly $1 billion settlement. The agreement settles long-standing disputes over whether the federal government mismanaged tribal money and resources. Host Michel Martin speaks with Rob Capriccioso of Indian Country Today Media Network.

Governing
10:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

D.C. Mayor Says Residents Not Free

Monday is Emancipation Day in Washington, D.C. In 1862, more than 3,000 slaves in the nation's capital were freed. Host Michel Martin speaks with Washington, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray about Emancipation Day, and why he says Washington still suffers from a type of slavery.

Politics
10:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Could Billionaire Koch Brothers Ruin Cato?

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 9:56 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In a few minutes, we will tell you about a billion dollar settlement, years in the making, between the Justice Department and 41 Native American tribes, over what the tribes have called years of mismanagement of tribal money and resources. We'll have that conversation in a few minutes.

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Music Reviews
9:41 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Loudon Wainwright III Looks Back At His 'Old Man'

As Loudon Wainwright III says in his song "In C," he likes to sing about "my favorite protagonist — me."

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Mon April 16, 2012

At Boston Marathon: Hot Temps And New Wheelchair Race Record

Before the start of the Boston Marathon this morning, a runner grabbed a bottle of water from among the hundreds lined up on a table in Hopkinton, Mass.
Stew Milne AP

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 10:23 am

The big story at today's Boston Marathon is the weather — in particular the bright, sunny skies and temperatures in the 80s that have race officials worried about how well some of the 27,000 registered runners will cope with the heat for 26.2 miles.

As the Boston Globe says, the medical tents are likely going to be quite busy today. And the Globe says that:

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The Two-Way
5:38 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Prosecutor Who Led Ill-Fated Ted Stevens Case To Leave Justice Department

A federal prosecutor who led the elite public integrity unit when the case against the late Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens collapsed has told associates he will leave the Justice Department.

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Around the Nation
5:08 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Phish Organizes 'More Cowbell' Weekend In Vermont

In Burlington, Vt., hundreds of people showed up to try to break the record for world's largest cowbell ensemble. The jam band Phish organized the event to raise money for flood relief in Vermont.

Around the Nation
4:53 am
Mon April 16, 2012

NRA Gets In On The Zombie Craze

The National Rifle Association's annual convention featured a display of shooting targets featuring zombies. Firing ranges across the country are offering zombie-themed shooting events. Sales of zombie targets are booming.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Confessed Killer Of 77 Goes On Trial In Norway

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 5:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the man who has confessed to carrying out Norway's worst peacetime atrocity goes on trial today. Anders Behring Breivik, a right-wing extremist, raised his fist in a Nazi-style salute after bailiffs removed his handcuffs in the courtroom. Breivik has told authorities he acted to protect Norway from Muslims. The rampage in Oslo and at a youth camp left 77 people dead and dozens injured. NPR's Eric Westervelt is in Oslo and reports that the central issue for judges will be Breivik's mental health.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Secret Service Scandal, Cuba;' Absence Distracts From Summit

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Lynn Neary is in for Renee this week. Lynn, welcome to the program.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Good to be here.

President Obama is back in Washington this morning, after a weekend summit in Colombia. The gathering with leaders from throughout the Americas produced some agreement on trade and some disagreement on drug policy in Cuba.

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Analysis
2:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 4:25 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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Afghanistan
2:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Taliban Claims Responsibility For Afghan Attacks

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

What the Taliban are calling the start of their spring offensive kept security forces across Afghanistan fighting throughout Sunday and into this morning. Officials say 36 insurgents were killed in Kabul and three other eastern provinces. Three civilians died in the attacks, and eight members of the police and army were killed. American officials are praising Afghan forces, but questions remain about how the insurgents were able to infiltrate the most secure parts of the capital. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHATTER)

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Egypt's Election Commission Disqualifies 10 Presidential Candidates

The Egyptian elections were thrown an unexpected curve when 10 presidential candidates were disqualified from the ballot. They include hopefuls from the Muslim Brotherhood and the old guard.

Law
1:20 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Clemens Faces Trial (Again) Over Doping Testimony

Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens stops to sign a baseball as he leaves the federal courthouse in Washington, D.C., on July 14, 2011, after a judge declared a mistrial in his perjury trial.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 7:06 am

Baseball star Roger Clemens goes on trial for a second time Monday on charges that he lied to a congressional committee about using steroids and human growth hormone. His trial on perjury and obstruction charges last summer ended abruptly when prosecutors mistakenly showed the jury evidence that the judge had ruled inadmissible.

Clemens won a record seven Cy Young awards during his storied pitching career, but prosecutors contend that he used steroids and human growth hormone to prolong that career.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:20 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Deadly 'Choking Game' Comes With Big Risks

Connor Galloway, age 12, was found dead in his bedroom with a belt looped around his neck. Connor's friends admitted to his mother that they'd been talking about playing "the choking game."
Courtesy of the Galloway family

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 6:48 am

Michele Galloway went looking for her son, Connor, one morning in their Webster, N.C., home to make sure the seventh-grader hadn't overslept.

"I opened the door and I found him," Galloway said. "And he looked like he was standing up beside his bed. And I just said, 'Connor, you're awake.' And then I realized he was not awake."

She looked more closely. "There was a little gap between his feet and the floor," she said. "And I realized, you know, he had a belt around his neck."

The other end of Connor's belt was looped around the top of his bunk bed.

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Around the Nation
1:19 am
Mon April 16, 2012

A Push To Help U.S. Veterans Fight Homelessness

Veteran James Brown relaxes in his apartment, which he recently moved into after spending decades on the streets.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 7:54 am

Last year, the number of homeless U.S. veterans on a given night dropped 12 percent from the year before. But tens of thousands were still on the streets, and more could be joining them as troops return from Afghanistan and Iraq. President Obama has vowed to end veterans' homelessness by 2015.

Homeless No More

James Brown left the Army in 1979. And for most of the next 32 years, he lived on the streets in and around Los Angeles. You might have seen him: the dirty, disheveled guy trying to keep warm in a cardboard box.

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The Two-Way
1:18 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Americans Do Not Walk The Walk, And That's A Growing Problem

Americans walk less than the citizens of any other industrialized nation, says Tom Vanderbilt. In this file photo from last summer, pedestrians and a cyclist cross the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

"Americans now walk the least of any industrialized nation in the world," says writer Tom Vanderbilt. To find out why that is, Vanderbilt has been exploring how towns are built, how Americans view walking — and what might be done to get them moving around on their own two feet.

Talking with Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep about what is wrong with Americans' relationship with walking, Vanderbilt says, "The main thing is, we're just not doing enough of it."

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Shots - Health Blog
1:17 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Why Women Suffer More Migraines Than Men

A vintage ad for a headache remedy plays to women.
The National Library of Medicine

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 6:52 am

One in four women has had a migraine. And, it turns out, the debilitating headaches affect three times more women than men.

But why?

Decades ago, these headaches were attributed to women's inability to cope with stress, a sort of hysteria. Now experts are starting to figure out the factors that really make a difference.

Today scientists know a migraine is all in your head — but not in that old-fashioned sense. Migraines are biologically based, and they play themselves out as a wave of electrical activity traveling across the brain.

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Your Money
3:36 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

The Tax Man Cometh! But For Whom?

In the U.S., the top 10 percent of income earners pay 70 percent of all federal income taxes.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun April 15, 2012 7:30 pm

It's that time of year again – tax week.

With the deadline for Americans to file their income taxes looming, there's a good chance you've heard or will hear from politicians, on cable news and on talk radio about those who pay little or no taxes.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor has said that we "have a situation in this country where you're nearing 50 percent of people who don't even pay income taxes." There are even those who say that there are nearly 50 percent of Americans who pay no taxes at all.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

Tornado Warnings May Have Had Desired Effect

Over 100 tornadoes touched down Saturday in the Great Plains, causing millions of dollars in damage across Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Despite the wreckage, there were few fatalities, a result perhaps due in part to the National Weather Service's warnings. Russell Schneider of the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., offers his insight.

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